Yahoo Won't Let Me Reset My Password Without Migrating My Gmail Account to Them

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Dec 28, 2020
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9
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Help - my family photos are being held hostage because Yahoo will not give me the chance to reset my password from an old email account. I would like to access approximately 250 photos I uploaded to Snapfish from a family vacation in 2006 under my old Yahoo email account. Snapfish will not give me access to the photos through my current Gmail account unless I can merge the old Yahoo email account with it. But I no longer remember the Yahoo email account's password. Yahoo will not let me retrieve or reset the password unless I either subscribe to a $5/month online help service or migrate my Gmail account to Yahoo. I don't want to do either. I just want access to that Yahoo email account so I can get my photos from Snapfish. I would like to order prints from Snapfish of the photos but I cannot get to them without that darn Yahoo account password. Any suggestions, please?
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
3,400
5,450
Maui Hawaii
Help - my family photos are being held hostage because Yahoo will not give me the chance to reset my password from an old email account. I would like to access approximately 250 photos I uploaded to Snapfish from a family vacation in 2006 under my old Yahoo email account. Snapfish will not give me access to the photos through my current Gmail account unless I can merge the old Yahoo email account with it. But I no longer remember the Yahoo email account's password. Yahoo will not let me retrieve or reset the password unless I either subscribe to a $5/month online help service or migrate my Gmail account to Yahoo. I don't want to do either. I just want access to that Yahoo email account so I can get my photos from Snapfish. I would like to order prints from Snapfish of the photos but I cannot get to them without that darn Yahoo account password. Any suggestions, please?
Pay $5 and cancel after a month. Use a credit card and cancel the card after one month.
 
Dec 28, 2020
4
9
57
Thank you. Although that may solve the problem it is an action that is complicit with Yahoo's user-unfriendly practices. I was hoping there would be a way to outsmart their meanness instead of playing into it. But you are right - it is probably the easiest step to take. I am glad I ditched them for Gmail over a decade ago.
 

Dwayne Coward

Administrator
Staff Member
Forum Director
Apr 13, 2016
1,065
2,304
St. Louis
Unfortunately, this is a problem with any free service, there is virtually no customer service. You are basically getting what you paid for it! At least Yahoo is giving you a route to be able to retrieve it, most of these services don't. We see a lot of submissions on Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, Gmail, AOL mail among others that if you are not able to use the automated password recovery system, there is no alternative way to obtain this information. In a way, I can understand them charging a one time charge to do so, as it does take resources to verify the individual and ensure they are giving access to the correct individual.

This is a good reminder to back up all this data to a secondary source such as an external hard drive and not rely on these websites alone for storage.
 

kenish

Sep 1, 2015
1,175
2,230
KSNA
Can you create a new "shill" Gmail account (they're free), and migrate it to Yahoo? That said, @Dwayne Coward is spot-on. Free cloud storage should be the backup and not the primary/sole storage for your valuable data. For example Google needed a rich source of image data and Google Photos gave them all the free data they needed. First, to develop and hone their image and facial recognition tools; then applying those tools to the photos to help build a profile on places you've visited, your friends and family, etc. Now that it's maturing, Google Photos will start charging certain uses.

I have no problem with Google Photos or other free storage will full knowledge it's to benefit them with a side-benefit to me of backup storage. I also have no problem with subscription cloud storage where my data is strictly private (except for court orders, security/police agencies, etc. that are not a worry for me).
 
Last edited:
Dec 28, 2020
4
9
57
Unfortunately, this is a problem with any free service, there is virtually no customer service. You are basically getting what you paid for it! At least Yahoo is giving you a route to be able to retrieve it, most of these services don't. We see a lot of submissions on Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, Gmail, AOL mail among others that if you are not able to use the automated password recovery system, there is no alternative way to obtain this information. In a way, I can understand them charging a one time charge to do so, as it does take resources to verify the individual and ensure they are giving access to the correct individual.

This is a good reminder to back up all this data to a secondary source such as an external hard drive and not rely on these websites alone for storage.
Thank you. You are correct. What is irksome is that Yahoo will not send a link to resent the password to my Gmail address but of course I am to blame for letting this all go for far too long. I no longer remember where I may have backed up the photos to. Perhaps a hard drive somewhere in a closet. But sometimes when one changes laptops, changes ISPs or changes phones, things get lost in the shuffle. This is one of those times.
 

VoR61

Jan 6, 2015
4,062
6,487
the United States
Free password advice to consider from a "tech guy" . . .

Passwords can be creatively designed by combining elements from a site with other elements that only you know. Here is some examples pulled "off the top of my head".

Choose two punctuation marks - I choose the "|" and a comma
Choose a relative's birth year: -I choose 14
Choose a favorite actor - I choose Antonio Banderas

For Yahoo Email the password could be "yhm41, AB, |" (since their site shows the name in lower case)

the first three are the letters that begin each syllable, the next two are the birth year "backwards", the two that follow are the actor's initials, and then the "|"

For, let's say, Citigroup, the password becomes "Ctg41, AB, |"

To make it a littlle harder to "hack" I'll choose to begin with the "|" for sites whose name begins with the letters A through M. Thus the Citigroup password becomes |, Ctg41, AB


and so on. There are many combinations than can work in a way that protects privacy yet allows users to instantly know their password for any site.

Added note: always choose a scheme based upon the most restrictive site to which you log on.
 
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jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
11,035
13,200
San Francisco
This has got to be frustrating. But keep plugging along, trying everything nine times, do an internet search to see if anyone has successfully dealt with this. To avoid this kind of angst, here's what I do: buy a flash drive. Put it in a secure wrapping. Back up anything and everything on your computer at the time you do it. Keep the flash in your car in case your house burns down. Ten minutes a week will save hours of frustration and effort in the future. I never advise using a "password service", putting your passwords online seems insane to me. I put all my access info on a spreadsheet. I use a code so even if someone found my spreadsheet, it would take them a long time to figure out my passwords. By then I would have changed them all. I had to access a 6-year-old AOL account last year to get into a computer at the office. There were my old spreadsheets, safe on my flash drive in my truck.
 
Nov 27, 2019
202
561
I never advise using a "password service", putting your passwords online seems insane to me.
If you're not using a password manager, you're probably duplicating passwords, or at least using less secure passwords (if you can remember over a hundred random combinations of lowercase letters, uppercase letters, numbers, and symbols, you have a better memory than I!). Everything's a tradeoff.
 
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jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
11,035
13,200
San Francisco
If you're not using a password manager, you're probably duplicating passwords, or at least using less secure passwords (if you can remember over a hundred random combinations of lowercase letters, uppercase letters, numbers, and symbols, you have a better memory than I!). Everything's a tradeoff.
I only remember a few. The rest, as I explained, are on a spreadsheet. The whole cloud concept is too new and unproven for my comfort.
 

Carrie Livingston

Staff Member
Forum Moderator
Jan 6, 2015
1,647
2,103
47
St Louis
@jsn55 I use a program called SplashID Safe. I've had it for probably 10 years. I'm sure I could use it online but I have an app on my computer, phone, and tablet and it synchronizes between apps. It will generate passwords or just record and there are several fields you can add if necessary.
 

kenish

Sep 1, 2015
1,175
2,230
KSNA
I only remember a few. The rest, as I explained, are on a spreadsheet. The whole cloud concept is too new and unproven for my comfort.
Many reasons why, but a cloud-based password manager (Lastpass, Dashlane, etc) is far more secure from malice, data loss, or disaster than on physical media. Not only are there "techhie" reasons; there are practical reasons too.

Thought exercise- the cloud password sites are a gold mine and a big fat target for hackers. I have never seen a report of a hack in the tech or popular press. Lastpass announced discovery of a vulnerability in their site a few years ago but nobody successfully exploited it.
 
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jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
11,035
13,200
San Francisco
In the financial services business, I've seen many instances of money disappearing out of brokerage accounts. Including one Christmas Eve million dollar plus disappearance twenty years ago. This stuff is happening every day, but nobody talks about it. Nobody wants "panic" in the street, so they just give the customer some plausible reason, make them whole, and everyone moves on. Unless there's a leak, there are no reports of this kind of thing, ever. Unless you're on the inside, you assume everything is well protected. And that's good for business.