Worried: shorten 1st name on ticket different from passport

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Apr 3, 2016
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#21
Good luck. From what I read above, three airlines are involved(AA, Finair,Iberia). If you do not get all three of them to change the ticket, then you will need to buy a new ticket (you do not want to get denied boarding mid-trip). Also, you may find that all 3 airlines do not have agents at the ft Lauderdale airport (or agents are there very limited times).
 
Sep 27, 2018
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#22
Paying a travel agent to book an airline that can be easily bought with a few clicks of your mouse seems like a waste of money--until this happens. Especially for international tickets! There are so many rules that seem to make no sense to the infrequent traveler. Rules that seem crazy, stupid, unfair, or downright money-grabbing. But they are the rules and fliers have to abide by them.
Not necessarily. I have a file with our corporate travel agent that has my name exactly as it is on my passport, yet at times I get tix issued that are wrong. The name on the reservation looks good, but when the boarding pass is printed, it is changed. Yet when I book a tix directly with the airline, no problems. The best I can figure is some database that has an old version of my name from decades ago that is used by travel agents. The only good news is the ravel agent has to eat the cost.
 

Neil Maley

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#23
Not necessarily. I have a file with our corporate travel agent that has my name exactly as it is on my passport, yet at times I get tix issued that are wrong. The name on the reservation looks good, but when the boarding pass is printed, it is changed. Yet when I book a tix directly with the airline, no problems. The best I can figure is some database that has an old version of my name from decades ago that is used by travel agents. The only good news is the ravel agent has to eat the cost.
That is exactly right- the agent does eat it and if they haven’t corrected whatever data base they are using - shame on them.
 
Apr 19, 2017
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#24
This is a policy of all major airlines -- some of the low cost airlines allow it with a fee. part of the rationale is to prevent ticket scalping.
As an IT person, I can assure you there is no technical reason to require a new ticket fort a name change. It’s just a data field, and $25 would be a generous fee for changing it. The only reason airlines require a new ticket is to screw the customers.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#25
As an IT person, I can assure you there is no technical reason to require a new ticket fort a name change. It’s just a data field, and $25 would be a generous fee for changing it. The only reason airlines require a new ticket is to screw the customers.
I recently tried to buy tickets to a concert. Within 10 minutes they were all sold out and “brokers” had tickets for sale on SXXXXXX for 2 times face value — they used bots to buy hundreds of tickets.

This is not an IT issue it is marketplace issue.

As someone who rarely books travel far in advance I could easily see a resale market especially in the US where a one way domestic ticket is not overly expensive like a transatlantic— and people buying up the inexpensive tickets and trying to resell at a profit to people like me.
 
Apr 19, 2017
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#27
I recently tried to buy tickets to a concert. Within 10 minutes they were all sold out and “brokers” had tickets for sale on SXXXXXX for 2 times face value — they used bots to buy hundreds of tickets.

This is not an IT issue it is marketplace issue.

As someone who rarely books travel far in advance I could easily see a resale market especially in the US where a one way domestic ticket is not overly expensive like a transatlantic— and people buying up the inexpensive tickets and trying to resell at a profit to people like me.
I don’t agree with that policy because airline flights are not like concerts - nobody is going to take the risk of buying out future flights just for the potential of reselling tickets at a profit. Why not? Because the airlines themselves are using highly sophisticated “yield management” software that does a much better job of calculating future market prices than any speculator ever could.

But that’s all beside the point. Changing MIKE to MICHAEL is not the same as allowing a name to be changed to something totally different. I can remember when this name changes like this were routine. This policy didn’t cause a fraud apocalypse then, and it wouldn’t now. In fact, since tickets were printed on paper in those days, they could be freely traded by pax who for whatever reason had to change their plans. That didn’t cause an apocalypse either. If we made all those nonrefundable tickets transferable once again by allowing unlimited name changes, that would be a neat, consumer-friendly fix for the whole problem.

We’re all being sold a bale of pure, finest-kind lawn fertilizer on this issue.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#28
I don’t agree with that policy because airline flights are not like concerts - nobody is going to take the risk of buying out future flights just for the potential of reselling tickets at a profit. Why not? Because the airlines themselves are using highly sophisticated “yield management” software that does a much better job of calculating future market prices than any speculator ever could.

But that’s all beside the point. Changing MIKE to MICHAEL is not the same as allowing a name to be changed to something totally different. I can remember when this name changes like this were routine. This policy didn’t cause a fraud apocalypse then, and it wouldn’t now. In fact, since tickets were printed on paper in those days, they could be freely traded by pax who for whatever reason had to change their plans. That didn’t cause an apocalypse either. If we made all those nonrefundable tickets transferable once again by allowing unlimited name changes, that would be a neat, consumer-friendly fix for the whole problem.

We’re all being sold a bale of pure, finest-kind lawn fertilizer on this issue.
In my most recent case of attempting to buy a concert ticket the artist added a second night after the 10 min sellout so the “brokers” didn’t end up doing so well.

In the past — 70s and 80s — airtravel was a lot more expensive — the market was less accessible. Now it is fee for everything. Do I like it? No. But airtravel is a lot less expensive now but the quality is worse.

But from a business standpoint why would a company want unauthorized resellers to profit? I do not think this is airline specific.

I said earlier that this should be approached as a name correction and not a name change— but the bottom line is it is up to the consumer to check their booking. Expedia has a 24 hour refund in case of a mistake. There is a warning on the site saying that the ticket name must match the government ID.

Consumer needs to do the work to know what they are buying and what the policies are. Otherwise especially with travel hire a competent professional.
 
Apr 19, 2017
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#30
I recently tried to buy tickets to a concert. Within 10 minutes they were all sold out and “brokers” had tickets for sale on SXXXXXX for 2 times face value — they used bots to buy hundreds of tickets.

This is not an IT issue it is marketplace issue.
It becomes an IT issue when companies make fake claims about why they impose a given policy. What I'm saying is that there is no technical reason why a name change requires a new reservation, any more than changing your inflight meal choice would require a new reservation. They choose to handle it that way because it's lucrative.
 
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Sep 19, 2015
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#31
It becomes an IT issue when companies make fake claims about why they impose a given policy. What I'm saying is that there is no technical reason why a name change requires a new reservation, any more than changing your inflight meal choice would require a new reservation. They choose to handle it that way because it's lucrative.
Has any airline claimed that the change fee has anything to do with the actual cost of doing such a fee?

Name changes are not allowed on the carrier -- so what is the discussion of a fee?

Most airlines allow for a name correction of a few characters without a fee.

There are a lot of fees that are charged that have little to do with the actual cost of labor for the fee -- such as late cancellation, late dropping of a course at a University, late cancellation of an appointment, etc.
 
Apr 19, 2017
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#32
Has any airline claimed that the change fee has anything to do with the actual cost of doing such a fee?

Name changes are not allowed on the carrier -- so what is the discussion of a fee?
I keep encountering airline people who claim that "because we have to make a new reservation" we have to disallow low-cost name changes.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#33
I keep encountering airline people who claim that "because we have to make a new reservation" we have to disallow low-cost name changes.
No that is a cancellation and reissue of a ticket -- that is a new reservation-- the name correction is limited to a few characters -- So I can not name correct a ticket from Mary to Christina but can get a correction from Christine to Christina.
 

Neil Maley

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Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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#34
I hope our OP comes back and tells us what happened when he went to the airport.

We can argue what it takes to change the name it it doesn’t matter- the airlines cancel and rebook the tickets so arguing about the fact it’s a mere IT change is a moot point. It is but it’s not going to change what the airlines do. It’s a way for them to make money.
 
Sep 27, 2018
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#35
That is exactly right- the agent does eat it and if they haven’t corrected whatever data base they are using - shame on them.
I don't think the problem is a database under the travel agency's control. It is one of those back office databases. From the permutations in my name it is from flights taken 30 to 40 years ago on airlines that don't exist now, however, the data ends up being purchased during the bankruptcy sale. It survives forever, kind of like a Twinkie. I have the same problem with corporate shipping databases, where packages will be sent to locations where I have not worked in decades, despite giving my current address.
 
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