Uber disabled

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Sep 19, 2015
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#21
DoorDash will be my new best friend in the meantime. Thank you :)
As you may have guessed I love food delivery :)! Until you get this straightened out, Lyft for personal transport and DoorDash/ other food delivery services will keep you focused on your studies and work.

Sometimes the email reinstatement process can take some time. Keep us updated, hoping for a prompt resolution for you.
 
Likes: VoR61

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
17,110
15,586
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#22
I am not sure why you would report three drivers in an attempt to get “higher rated” drivers. When you call for an Uber, you get whoever is closest to you. You don’t get a choice. You choose the type of car you want, you don’t choose the driver.

Remove the “third party assistance”. What third party assistance are you referring to? As VoR said, that sounds like a threat. Uber is not a right, it’s a privilege and it’s their platform- they do not have to allow anyone to use their services.

If you sent that in your letter you might never hear from them and your account could possibly remain closed.
 
Apr 3, 2016
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#23
Also., mentioning that you keep a log of all the drivers/ride skills may not endear you to Uber. It implies you keep info for complaining. You might want to remove it. In the future, if you have a complaint about a ride, either report it right away or forget about it. There is not much Uber can do days/weeks later.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
17,110
15,586
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#24
Also., mentioning that you keep a log of all the drivers/ride skills may not endear you to Uber. It implies you keep info for complaining. You might want to remove it. In the future, if you have a complaint about a ride, either report it right away or forget about it. There is not much Uber can do days/weeks later.
Or set your expectations lower. I’ve used Uber for years in NYC and I don’t think I’ve had one bad experience. Cab drivers- different story.
 
Dec 17, 2018
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#25
Could Uber have flagged the account for excessive complaints?

One thing I have to say as a New York City resident -- drivers tend to be aggressive here -- and I am not just referring to Uber or taxis.

What issues were reported? Speeding? Where?
Yeah, I hate to say it, but driving in Manhattan is NOTHING like being anywhere (and I mean ANYWHERE) else in the country. SF isn't bad, Chicago isn't bad, LA is fine (except for the stop and go obviously, but totally different issue), but I refuse to driving in Manhattan. It literally terrifies me.

You have to be SO aggressive to get ANYTHING done when you're driving there. Has OP taken taxis? Or just regular black cars? Because I think OP is going to find the problem is PERVASIVE in NYC. They drive fast, stop fast, turn fast, pass fast - it's just all around aggressive.
 
Likes: VoR61
Dec 17, 2018
61
52
18
41
#26
Great ideas Christina!
And I find doordash to be cheaper, actually (by quite a bit). I use it almost daily for lunch (bad habit, must stop). I haven't tried uber eats, but there are PLENTY of other options. Just take Lyft. Honestly, I like Lyft SO MUCH MORE than Uber. There are tons more Lyft drivers than Uber drivers where I live and almost every single one I ask says they prefer driving for Lyft.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
17,110
15,586
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#30
I have to say as an aside, that VoR61 is one of the best members here... should be an official advocate... from what I have seen!!!
Some of the regulars that post don’t want to be official advocates and have their real names published.

And she is excellent too! I agree with you.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Jan 6, 2015
2,708
2,560
113
#32
I've been processing your posts in the past few days to determine if I should advise further, specifically about your future Uber driver experience. Wanting to give it a few "spin cycles", I believe I can now bring my thoughts into focus in a constructive way.

I begin where I always begin: context. For that I see two things: your move to NY, and your tolerance level for certain behaviors. Not wanting to critique your decisions, I will offer some adjustments for you to consider (food for thought).

I visited New York City once, and did not experience the great difference that some thought. Nonetheless, the culture is most certainly going to be quite different from Houston, even though they are both large cities. Values are the most important thing we have, so I would not suggest or recommend that you change who you are. But I think it can be safely said that you must adjust more to NY because it (and the people in it) probably won't adjust to you. I would include traffic patterns and driving behavior that have become "standard" for the metroplex.

The next context is you, and here's where it gets personal for me. I relate more than you might imagine to your frustrations. The challenge for me, and I see here for you also, is to adjust our expectations and responses to the likelihood that others will respond favorably. For that I'd like to comment on your main issues:
  • Speed (general). Happens all the time. We all do it. Maybe 5-10 miles per hour. In the context of Uber, I would 20 miles over the limit would be a deal-breaker. At that point, safety is certainly at risk.Acceleration. You did not include this, but it certainly plays into the "rider" position you are in. If the drivers are pinning your ears back, that would be a reasonable complaint. If not, I would chalk it up to NY driving.
  • Texting. Non-negotiable for this rider, unless it's being done while stationary.
  • Speeding (school zones). We live next to one, so a sensitive subject for me. I would temper my objections here according to how fast and whether or not children are present.
  • Weed and other drugs. Again, definitely non-negotiable for this rider.
I shared some specifics there to show how we can and should make reasonable adjustments to our "standards" if at all possible.

My final input will be centered around the "how". So many failures there for me. What has ultimately worked best for me is to set the default to silence. Then I wait to see if I can or even should adjust my tolerances, or speak up. Where possible, I walk away.

But you can't walk away easily as this is your method of transport around the city. How to speak up then? First, I suggest you sit down with the local dispatch office and ask a series of questions. Tell a manager what concerns you and ask what he/she thinks you should do. "Where am I going wrong?" is a favorite of mine. It shows them that I am open to options, and in turn gives them an opening to say that I am not out of line. And it tells me what I want to know most: are they open to criticism, or are they a "take it or leave it" enterprise. Either way, I gain valuable information and may have found a "friend" in the biz.

I'll finish by sharing an example of an important situation that I have faced over the years: restaurants! Oh the list I could post. We choose a "booth-in-the-corner-in-the-back-in-the-dark" for privacy. Been in too many where Larry the Loudmouth talks the whole time. And the music volume is so high I have to yell to place my order. Finally, I get the food and instead of XXXX minus this, plus that, and medium-well it has this, no that, and it's medium-rare. Or worse yet, 45 minutes go by with no food at all.

What do I do? Well, I used to ask them why, because dining is very important to me and this scenario happens a lot. And I "expressed my displeasure firmly". Fast forward 7-8 years and my approach and attitude has totally changed. I no longer ask why, because I get "political" answers. And it does not change the result. What does this same scenario look like today?

"We'd like a table please" (don’t care where now). What would you like? "I would appreciate . . .". Food comes, but "undercooked" a bit. I say nothing and eat it (ain't gonna kill me"). What about the 45 minutes? "We have plans and would like to leave if that's okay".

Am I disappointed? Absolutely. But I have adjusted my expectations and responses so as to achieve a better experience, And I am so much happier . . .
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
17,110
15,586
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#33
I've been processing your posts in the past few days to determine if I should advise further, specifically about your future Uber driver experience. Wanting to give it a few "spin cycles", I believe I can now bring my thoughts into focus in a constructive way.

I begin where I always begin: context. For that I see two things: your move to NY, and your tolerance level for certain behaviors. Not wanting to critique your decisions, I will offer some adjustments for you to consider (food for thought).

I visited New York City once, and did not experience the great difference that some thought. Nonetheless, the culture is most certainly going to be quite different from Houston, even though they are both large cities. Values are the most important thing we have, so I would not suggest or recommend that you change who you are. But I think it can be safely said that you must adjust more to NY because it (and the people in it) probably won't adjust to you. I would include traffic patterns and driving behavior that have become "standard" for the metroplex.

The next context is you, and here's where it gets personal for me. I relate more than you might imagine to your frustrations. The challenge for me, and I see here for you also, is to adjust our expectations and responses to the likelihood that others will respond favorably. For that I'd like to comment on your main issues:
  • Speed (general). Happens all the time. We all do it. Maybe 5-10 miles per hour. In the context of Uber, I would 20 miles over the limit would be a deal-breaker. At that point, safety is certainly at risk.Acceleration. You did not include this, but it certainly plays into the "rider" position you are in. If the drivers are pinning your ears back, that would be a reasonable complaint. If not, I would chalk it up to NY driving.
  • Texting. Non-negotiable for this rider, unless it's being done while stationary.
  • Speeding (school zones). We live next to one, so a sensitive subject for me. I would temper my objections here according to how fast and whether or not children are present.
  • Weed and other drugs. Again, definitely non-negotiable for this rider.
I shared some specifics there to show how we can and should make reasonable adjustments to our "standards" if at all possible.

My final input will be centered around the "how". So many failures there for me. What has ultimately worked best for me is to set the default to silence. Then I wait to see if I can or even should adjust my tolerances, or speak up. Where possible, I walk away.

But you can't walk away easily as this is your method of transport around the city. How to speak up then? First, I suggest you sit down with the local dispatch office and ask a series of questions. Tell a manager what concerns you and ask what he/she thinks you should do. "Where am I going wrong?" is a favorite of mine. It shows them that I am open to options, and in turn gives them an opening to say that I am not out of line. And it tells me what I want to know most: are they open to criticism, or are they a "take it or leave it" enterprise. Either way, I gain valuable information and may have found a "friend" in the biz.

I'll finish by sharing an example of an important situation that I have faced over the years: restaurants! Oh the list I could post. We choose a "booth-in-the-corner-in-the-back-in-the-dark" for privacy. Been in too many where Larry the Loudmouth talks the whole time. And the music volume is so high I have to yell to place my order. Finally, I get the food and instead of XXXX minus this, plus that, and medium-well it has this, no that, and it's medium-rare. Or worse yet, 45 minutes go by with no food at all.

What do I do? Well, I used to ask them why, because dining is very important to me and this scenario happens a lot. And I "expressed my displeasure firmly". Fast forward 7-8 years and my approach and attitude has totally changed. I no longer ask why, because I get "political" answers. And it does not change the result. What does this same scenario look like today?

"We'd like a table please" (don’t care where now). What would you like? "I would appreciate . . .". Food comes, but "undercooked" a bit. I say nothing and eat it (ain't gonna kill me"). What about the 45 minutes? "We have plans and would like to leave if that's okay".

Am I disappointed? Absolutely. But I have adjusted my expectations and responses so as to achieve a better experience, And I am so much happier . . .
We need a LOVE on this post. Great job again!