Turo

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Dec 2, 2018
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#1
I'm curious where this went. I'm currently in a back and forth with Turo trying to understand how their "independent assessment" company, SnapSheet, determined the amount of damage I have to pay. Turo shared the estimate with me and encouraged me to call SnapSheet. When I spoke to the SnapSheet rep and asked him what the annotation "Judgement Item" meant, he explained that their estimate was "based on Turo guidelines." More than half the items in the estimate are "Judgement Items."

It seems like the if a supposed 3rd party vendor is conducting it's estimates by the 1st party's guidelines, there is an obvious conflict of interest.

I'm currently emailing body shops in city with the attached pictures to get their guess-timate on the cost to repaint the scratch in an effort to talk down Turo's seemingly inflated estimate of $553.

If anyone has any thoughts or perspectives to share on this situation, I'd very much appreciate it! :)
 

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Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
15,713
14,247
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#2
Insurance doesn’t cover rentals through Turo. Did you have an accident with the car? The original poster never came back to update us in what happened but he needed an attorney. You may need one as well.
 
Oct 9, 2017
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#3
All of this is very much in keeping with my own Turo rental in 2017. The car I rented was defective in many ways, and the gas tank was empty. The owner lied repeatedly about connecting with him, leaving me waiting on a DC corner until near midnight for a few hours. Turns out he did not even own the car.

But the most disturbing aspect of this transaction was learning that Turo itself is not structured to handle such matters. I'm sure there's a word in their industry for a phone tree comprising agents who do not know much about the transaction, and operate in a silo with little more than a tight script of mainly legal disclaimers. They are 'trained' -- from the sound of it, ordered upon threat of dismissal -- to never escalate. Who knows if they can in the first place.

I sent many time-stamped photos on the broken door, the broken mirror, the empty tank with the odometer reading, and so on. As it was they partially reimbursed me, and not at all for a nearly full tank of gas. When I returned the car the dude -- not the owner -- brought a big guy along, presumably as a threat.

Crooks in the world, no surprise. Aiding and abetting them is different. I never got a proper apology from the company for any of this, presumably because that would admit liability. Maybe that's the main thing about Turo. The business model they sell to top investors is limited exposure, and a system that lets them put off customers and keep their own CSRs scared, clueless, and in the dark.

Is this business even regulated? Turo would have been in for big trouble if their vehicle had been involved in personal injury when the courts found out about its loosy-goosy controls and a lessor with no rights to the car who acted like a criminal.

Perhaps they will read this and see a business purpose in adopting some of the transparency I never saw, by responding in detail.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#4
Denver Don the “sharing economy” means write a computer program and pass on any risk and not be subject to any regulation at first, because the regulation tends to be reactive. Serious accident? I am sure Turo has their liability minimized.

I understand why people try out the sharing economy — I used a certain ride sharing app when traveling in the US and there was no taxi service or taxi service stood me up. But I also feel uneasy using said service as it is capitalized my massive investment banks that care about return — and that is it.
 
Likes: Denver Don

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
7,578
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San Francisco
#5
People need to stop buying into this "sharing economy" foolishness. It's a great theory, a good concept, but it only works if all participants are ethical. I cannot imagine anyone naive enough to rent someone's car and drive it without insurance. I'm actually surprised that it took this long for the bad guys to figure out how to scam the system. It's a real shame that honest people think others are to be trusted.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
15,713
14,247
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#6
According to Turo, the driver is responsible for bringing the car back with the same amount of gas that was in it when picked up.

From the website:

FAST FACTS
  • Guests must replenish the fuel level before returning the car.
  • Taking pre- and post-trip photos of the fuel gauge and saving your fuel receipts will serve as proof that you returned the car with the proper fuel level.
So you only had to return the car on empty as it was when you picked it up. Did you follow these instructions to take pictures of the gas gauge at pick up and drop off?


Second- Turo offers their own insurance for their rental cars for guests. Did you purchase one of the policies?

In the United States (excluding the state of New York where the Services are not available), Turo makes protections plans available to hosts and guests (except in the case of Commercial Hosts) with respect to the vehicle shared.
 
Dec 2, 2018
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#7
According to Turo, the driver is responsible for bringing the car back with the same amount of gas that was in it when picked up.

From the website:

FAST FACTS
  • Guests must replenish the fuel level before returning the car.
  • Taking pre- and post-trip photos of the fuel gauge and saving your fuel receipts will serve as proof that you returned the car with the proper fuel level.
So you only had to return the car on empty as it was when you picked it up. Did you follow these instructions to take pictures of the gas gauge at pick up and drop off?


Second- Turo offers their own insurance for their rental cars for guests. Did you purchase one of the policies?

In the United States (excluding the state of New York where the Services are not available), Turo makes protections plans available to hosts and guests (except in the case of Commercial Hosts) with respect to the vehicle shared.

Turo's insurance is crap. It has a deductible of $750, which coincidentally, is roughly what minor damages reported by car owners will get based on Turo's "independent" claims assessor's (Snapsheet) estimation. When I called them to ask about some of the items in the invoice annotated "judgement estimate," they told me they conducted their assessments based on guidance provided by Turo (What?!? !@#$%).

Anyway, Turo responded to my questions about the insurance claim process with answers but also a line to the effect of "We feel we've adequately resolved your questions and will proceed with billing your for charges within the next 24 hours." I responded with more questions, even spoke to the lady on the phone using the meeting request set up in their system (which set up 15 min calls that they'd actually dial in to 50% of the time). While they were responding to my follow up questions, I put the card I had on file "on-hold" (a neat setting Chase allows customers to do if they misplace their card and don't want to go nuclear and cancel a card and deal with the subsequent reentering of the new CC # on all your online and recurring accounts).

Anyway...fast forward...they respond to my questions, throwing out the same "we answered your questions adequately and will move forward with billing." A minute later, get an email saying my Chase card was charged but rejected. The next minute later, my AMEX card gets charged. The twist is that I had removed that card number with my Chase number over a year ago, but apparently Turo stores that info. Since I'm pretty sure, it's illegal to charge a card that wasn't provided by the customer in a specific transaction, I protested the charge and, at least for now, am covered by AMEX's investigation.

Turo has till March to come up with whatever documentation AMEX requested. I'm guessing they haven't provided the materials AMEX requested either because they're a mess OR they know they're in the wrong for charging a card that wasn't provided to them as part of the legal transaction.

Either way, Turo is sketchy AF and I never plan to use their app again. I've only kept the app on my phone so I can prove that the AMEX card they charged wasn't involved in the transaction in question. Curiously, when I check my "Approval Status," I'm given a message saying I'm not allowed to rent *womp womb* IDGAF

I'll circle back with an update on what happens next...

Screen Shot 2019-01-30 at 9.28.32 PM.png
 
Nov 20, 2015
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#8
Unfortunately, the terms of the agreement between you and Turo allow them to charge your AMEX. We've had posters complain about this practice with other companies (DirecTV, for example).

From Turo's terms of service:

"When you provide Turo a payment method, you authorize Turo, or third-party service providers acting on Turo’s behalf, to store your payment credential for future use in the event you owe Turo any money. You authorize Turo to use stored payment credentials for balances, including for Trip Costs, payment, fines and fees (e.g., late fees, security deposits, processing fees and claims costs and related administrative fees). "

You need to hope that Turo doesn''t respond to the dispute or that AMEX agrees that Turo is charging too much for the repair.
 
Mar 14, 2018
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#9
Unfortunately, the terms of the agreement between you and Turo allow them to charge your AMEX. We've had posters complain about this practice with other companies (DirecTV, for example).

From Turo's terms of service:

"When you provide Turo a payment method, you authorize Turo, or third-party service providers acting on Turo’s behalf, to store your payment credential for future use in the event you owe Turo any money. You authorize Turo to use stored payment credentials for balances, including for Trip Costs, payment, fines and fees (e.g., late fees, security deposits, processing fees and claims costs and related administrative fees). "

You need to hope that Turo doesn''t respond to the dispute or that AMEX agrees that Turo is charging too much for the repair.

The OP implied he removed the AMEX from his account over a year ago, so he probably has a good case that his authorization was withdrawn.

Even so, I think the OP is being quite unreasonable. He doesn't dispute that he damaged the bumper. Turo is only charging $550 to remove and repaint it. They are not using OEM parts, not charging for any administrative overhead, not charging for lost use and not charging for diminished value. Frankly, they are being far more reasonable than a traditional car rental company. If I were the owner of the car he borrowed and damaged, I would be very unhappy with this compensation.

Apogipinoy, unless you have some evidence that the charges are excessively high, you should just pay them. Keep in mind the owner has the right for the car to be returned to its original condition--just touching up the bumper is not an option.
 
Likes: Chris in NC