suffix on name

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Sep 22, 2018
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#1
My passport has a suffix (111) at the end of my name but my airline tickets do not. Do I need to worry about this?

I have searched this issue and have seen much confusion online with some people claiming they were denied boarding while others say there is no problem. Can someone on this site please give me a straight answer, like "yes it is a problem and it needs to match" or "no, it does not matter and you will not be denied boarding even though the airline ticket does not match the passport because of the suffix being absent on the ticket"?

Is the answer different for international flights vs. domestic (US) flights?

Thank you very much in advance.

BTW, I love Elliott's website.
 
Feb 21, 2018
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#4
My husband goes through a similar issue whenever we fly. He is a "3rd", and his passport includes his last name, a space, and "III" as does his driver's license.

Whenever I book an airline ticket, no matter how I fill out the name information, the confirmation comes back with "iii" added on to his last name, so using the name Smith as an example, his ticket would have his last name as Smithiii.

He has never had any issue at all getting through security or checking in. An American Airline customer service rep told me once that their computers just don't allow for the space or the capital letter "I" to be used. They said the TSA is aware of this as are most all airlines, and generally that suffix isn't going to prevent us from getting on a plane.
 
Likes: jsn55

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#5
My passport has a suffix (111) at the end of my name but my airline tickets do not. Do I need to worry about this?

I have searched this issue and have seen much confusion online with some people claiming they were denied boarding while others say there is no problem. Can someone on this site please give me a straight answer, like "yes it is a problem and it needs to match" or "no, it does not matter and you will not be denied boarding even though the airline ticket does not match the passport because of the suffix being absent on the ticket"?

Is the answer different for international flights vs. domestic (US) flights?

Thank you very much in advance.

BTW, I love Elliott's website.
I'm glad to hear that you love the website, we advocates enjoy helping people solve problems and it's nice to hear that we're appreciated. Drew, the straight answer to your question is ... surprise! ... you have to verify each airline's procedures. While we don't think that security will bother you here in the US, nobody knows that for absolute sure either. An airline agent will tell you anything on the phone or in person to get you to go away. If you can find something in writing from your airline, print it out and take it with you to the airport. Arrive early just in case. Most travel snafus can be fixed if there's enough time and nobody gets hysterical. I'm 95% sure that you'll have no issues ... but always wise to take precautions.
 
Jul 27, 2016
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#6
I have a suffix, it's on my passport, but not my DL, and not my frequent flier info for the airlines, so not on my tickets. Have never had an issue.
 
Likes: jsn55
Sep 22, 2018
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#8
Thanks for all the posts in reply. I ended up calling Princess Cruises as I arranged the cruise booking and the air at the same time. They confirmed that the suffix was properly in the system for my name. This is a domestic flight in the US on American Airlines. After checking with the flight desk to make sure, the lady on the phone informed me that there will be no problem for me as long as my father (same name but different suffix) is not on the flight. She also told me that each airline handles the suffix issue differently and that American Airlines is not strict about it. Personally, I think each airline's software handles it a bit differently.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
May 16, 2018
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#10
My husband goes through a similar issue whenever we fly. He is a "3rd", and his passport includes his last name, a space, and "III" as does his driver's license.

Whenever I book an airline ticket, no matter how I fill out the name information, the confirmation comes back with "iii" added on to his last name, so using the name Smith as an example, his ticket would have his last name as Smithiii.

He has never had any issue at all getting through security or checking in. An American Airline customer service rep told me once that their computers just don't allow for the space or the capital letter "I" to be used. They said the TSA is aware of this as are most all airlines, and generally that suffix isn't going to prevent us from getting on a plane.
It's just ridiculous that sophisticated computers can't type the most basic things, like a space, or a hyphenated name. Since that is now required for security, and since the airlines will slam you by forcing you to buy another ticket if the name on the ticket doesn't match the passport, they should be required by law to type in people's names correctly. It's really not that hard.

Now that my rant is over I should say that we had so many hassles that we made our own solution. My husband has a second last name (as is common in some cultures), and the computers were completely unable to handle this. They either smooshed it all together as one word or they dropped some letters off the second last name, or butchered it in some other way. Then, when we would board, they would complain that the names didn't match the passport.

After constant aggravation, he dropped the second last name from both his passport and license. Now everything matches the air tickets which have only the primary last name as well. By the way, it was no problem to get a passport and license renewed with just the one last name, even though his birth certificate has both last names. He simply filled out his passport application with only the primary last name, and that was that. No more problems.
 
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Neil Maley

Moderator
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Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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#11
I have to agree about this. Everyone doesn’t have names that fit into the boxes on airline websites. Sometimes even travel agents have anxiety over issuing tickets when a name is long or has hyphens, Jrs, Srs, III or IV.
 
May 16, 2018
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#12
I have to agree about this. Everyone doesn’t have names that fit into the boxes on airline websites. Sometimes even travel agents have anxiety over issuing tickets when a name is long or has hyphens, Jrs, Srs, III or IV.
This is exactly what I'm talking about. If the airlines cannot find a way to have the name written on the ticket as it is on the passport, with all the names, all the letters in long names, all the hyphens, Jr., Sr., III, etc., then they have no business charging any passenger for a new ticket when the name does not match the passport. The airlines cannot require that we pay to correct a problem that they caused and cannot fix. And, if TSA is going to insist that it match, then Homeland Security needs to legally require that the airlines enter people's names correctly, and penalize airlines that don't update their computers to comply.
 
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jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#13
You are absolutely right, Jane. Airlines need to spend some money on programming to avoid these kinds of annoying issues. Homeland/TSA should require them to either upgrade their software so ALL passengers can use it to conform with the law, or relax the "same name" rules. The issue is, of course, the airline lobby whose sole focus is that all airlines are allowed to operate however they please.