Social Media - What Can & Can't I Say?

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Apr 21, 2019
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#1
Hello,

I am here to learn more from consumer advocates and what one can and can not say about poor service. I write a blog where I help the average consumer who is a victim of attorney negligence. I am not an attorney, but I have experience in this area and help my readers since most can't afford to hire an attorney. Most are seeking refunds or help to navigate their state bars to file a grievance, and I have done both. At any rate, I am seeking the best material available on what one can and can't say about an attorney who has provided poor service.

Ken Gilley
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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www.promalvacations.com
#2
Honestly- that’s s question for an attorney to answer. Would you be the ones posting or would the Consumer?

The best way to handle any type of public website is to state facts only as you know and not to slander
anyone.
 
Likes: VoR61

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#3
I would think that the states' BAR associations would be a good source of this information. Basically, you don't want to say anything negative about someone if your mother would object to your use of words. Kudos to you for helping people who need legal help and don't know where to turn. It's a great service.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Apr 21, 2019
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#7
I would think that the states' BAR associations would be a good source of this information. Basically, you don't want to say anything negative about someone if your mother would object to your use of words. Kudos to you for helping people who need legal help and don't know where to turn. It's a great service.
Nope, the state bar associates can't help but thanks.
 
Jul 30, 2018
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#8
I work as a Paralegal in the D.C. metro area. Most local bar associations offer a very valuable (yet little used) community service called the Lawyer Referral Service (LRS). For a nominal fee, usually $35-40, the LRS can set you up for a 30 minute consultation with a local attorney, either in person or over telephone. Contact your local bar association and ask for the LRS. This is a great (and inexpensive) place to start your research. Best Wishes!
 
Dec 17, 2018
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#9
What is your concern? If it is legal liability, then you need to contact a lawyer.
He basically wants to know what he can tell his blog readers about what they can or cannot say about an attorney they aren't happy with. The issue is possible libel.

OP... you have to really be careful - you are not an attorney so you CANNOT give ANY legal advice AT ALL. There is a FINE LINE between giving information and giving legal advice. You can tell people where they can go to file a complaint, you can cite to statutes or cases that define libel/slander, but if you start ANALYZING facts and APPLYING them to law, you are crossing the line. And the state bar in your state can and WILL come after you for practicing law without a license.

As for what someone can say without liability, you can say anything about someone that is provably true. You can state opinions. You can't just make stuff up. And yes, I'm an attorney.
 
Dec 17, 2018
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#10
I work as a Paralegal in the D.C. metro area. Most local bar associations offer a very valuable (yet little used) community service called the Lawyer Referral Service (LRS). For a nominal fee, usually $35-40, the LRS can set you up for a 30 minute consultation with a local attorney, either in person or over telephone. Contact your local bar association and ask for the LRS. This is a great (and inexpensive) place to start your research. Best Wishes!
I think the real issue is that most attorneys aren't going to want to tell someone how that person can tell OTHER people what kind of "bad things" they can say about other attorneys. Attorneys get really weirded out about ethics issues. I mean, I'll talk to anyone about anything, but I'm kind of a weird attorney. I just like discussing law - I should've been a judge or a mediator or a professor (and yes, I could pursue those, but they are HARD to get into... I've taught law before and it's not an easy field to break into and stay in). But most attorneys aren't like me...

OP's best bet is to find an attorney who specializes in legal malpractice, because they are the ones who MIGHT talk to him about this.