since its merger, Marriott has become an "unfriendly" company to deal with

  • Hi Guest, welcome to the help forum. You can get fast answers to your customer service questions here. We have a dedicated team of advocates who are ready to help. Just go to the section that matches your question and ask us!
  • If you've posted a question or issue for our advocates to assist with, please be sure to check back frequently for responses and requests for clarification.
  • Did you know you can get email notifications when something new posts to your favorite forum? It's easy. Just click the "watch" link right next to the "post new thread" button at the top of your favorite forum. The rest is easy. Now you'll never miss another conversation.
  • Want to become an expert user? Drop by the How to use this forum section and all will be revealed. We'll show you how to make the most of your experience.
Jul 30, 2018
3
0
1
78
#1
I recently used 180,000 points and almost $1,000 to reserve a "suite" at the Algonquin Hotel in New York City. Marriott claimed it was a category 9 hotel (its highest level). The day before we were to check in, I received an e-mail from the operations manager of the hotel advising me that there was no longer room service at this hotel; that there was no longer a coffee machine at the hotel and that other benefits were changed. Sinncce I was arriving gthe next day, I really had no opportunity to change hotels.
Within the four nights we were there I wound up with a list of 15 different complaints about this stay.
Upon returning home, I attempted to contact their customer service department to try to resolve these issues. I would up calling Customer service, I think five times. each time, I had to wait 30 inutges just to speak to someone. Representatives would thenput me on hold and after 50 minutes on the phone, I would just hang up.
then, i finally reached a supervisor whose name I recorded. He promised me 40,000 points and said that if I wanted additional points, i would have to deal with the hotel. I did call thehotel and they agreed to give me 90,000 additional points.
I received the points from the hotel but not the pointsw from Marriott.
When I called Marriott customer service ( I am a lifetime Gold Elite member) to find out what happened to the other 40,000 points, the agent refused to give me anything more than her first name and proceeded to tell me that I was not going to get those 40,000 points. I asked to speak to the supervisor who promoised the points and she immediately said he was not available.
She told me she wouldnot conect me woth the perwson who proimised the points and that if I continued to protest, I would lose my Gold Elite service.

I want to be clear. By any standard, the "suite" we had was of a lower quality than I get at a reguyalr Marriott Hotel.
The attitude, now that they have merged with Sheraton and those other hotels, is adversarial. They seem to make anyone with a complaint go through hell just to reach a representative and they do whatever possible to anger, frustrate and squelch anyone who feels they were mistreated.
I truly feel that Marriott now feels they can just bully people who are disatisfied.
 
Sep 19, 2015
4,034
5,343
113
48
#2
I have noticed that the term "suite" means different things at different hotels. the Algonquin is not the most modern hotel, but more an historical institution. Rooms in NYC are pretty small.

Interesting that they did away with room service. I would imagine in NYC many would not use it.

Could the 90,000 points included the first 40,000? Have they outsourced their customer service? That sort of response should not happen.

You can use the company contacts to let them know of your experience.
 
Jul 30, 2018
3
0
1
78
#4
Here you go:
https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/#hotel

Get off the phone and only deal by e-mail. Before you write, read the information on the Company Contact page on how to write and then follow it. Let us know how you do.
I am doing that. Thank you
I have noticed that the term "suite" means different things at different hotels. the Algonquin is not the most modern hotel, but more an historical institution. Rooms in NYC are pretty small.

Interesting that they did away with room service. I would imagine in NYC many would not use it.

Could the 90,000 points included the first 40,000? Have they outsourced their customer service? That sort of response should not happen.

You can use the company contacts to let them know of your experience.
Suites in two other Marrikotts
 
Jul 30, 2018
3
0
1
78
#5
Suites in two other Marrikotts
I am doing that. Thank you

Suites in two other Marrikotts
I am doing that. Thank you

Suites in two other Marrikotts
I am doing that. Thank you

Suites in two other Marrikotts
Suites on two other Marriott properties within walking distance of the Algonquin have 50-75% more space AND room service AND coffe service in the room. So, had I known in advance (not 12 hrs in advance) I wold have reserved the other hotels. But bedrooms with one night stand, no closet space and many other issues - do not make this hotel deserve the HIGHEST classification in the Marriott chain.
 
Dec 19, 2014
218
376
63
46
#6
Couple of notes:
1) Yes, the Algonquin is a category 9 hotel, which at current redemption rates (prior to August 18, 2018) is 45,000 points a night. After August 18, 2018, it will be 50,000 points a night. So, based on what you wrote, the 180,000 was 45,000 X 4 nights at category 9. The $1000 charge would likely be the "suite" upgrade.
The category of the hotel does not necessarily correspond to a particular brand, rather it is based on demand of reward redemption rates. There are Fairfield Inns and Courtyard Hotels as high as category 8, and Autograph Hotels as low as category 5.
2) The question is, did you get a suite? Many hotels in New York, in particular older properties, have smaller rooms compared to more modern hotels. Did your "suite" have a separate living/sleeping area? If it did, then you got what you reserved. If not, then you have a legitimate complaint that you did not get what you booked. Keep in mind, some of the suites aren't necessarily bigger than standard rooms elsewhere.
3) Was the 90,000 points inclusive or exclusive of the 40,000 points you were initially promised? My suspicion is that the 90,000 points "promised" by the hotel included the original 40,000 points, since ultimately points are deducted against the individual property.
4) What is your end game? Are you wanting an additional 40,000 points in additional to the 90,000 for a total of 130,000. Frankly, that seems a bit excessive, and while you may get it by writing the executives, your account may be flagged.
5) BTW, if you choose to write, don't list each one of the 15 complaints. Focus on the core issues as to why the changes didn't work for you (ie you needed to entertain a client for a important business meeting, hence the suite and room service).
6) As a fellow Marriott elite member, no I do not feel that there has been any significant changes in customer service.

A side note.... 180,000 will get you 4 or 5 nights (same redemption rate)
 
Dec 19, 2014
218
376
63
46
#7
... But bedrooms with one night stand, no closet space and many other issues - do not make this hotel deserve the HIGHEST classification in the Marriott chain.
The classification is based on demand and award redemption rates, not based on level of service. It is a mistake to assume that the highest category redemption automatically means the top of the line hotels. As I posted above, there are Fairfield Inn hotels that are category 8.
 
Likes: AMA
Sep 19, 2015
4,034
5,343
113
48
#8
The Autograph hotels are those with a more historic atmosphere and not your corporate Marriott cookie cutter.

I looked at some online reviews. It appears there have not been coffee machines in the rooms or room service offered as far back as November 2016. This is mentioned again in March 2017 and other reviews.

The fact that the rooms are smaller is also mentioned in many reviews and the approximate square footage of rooms in mentioned. One can easily see that the least expensive rooms at the Marriott Marquis are about 100 some square feet larger than the equivalent at the Algonquin.

Some people prefer more historical and others want corporate predictability. The Autograph collection is not corporate predictability. I visited a friend staying at the Marriott Marquis which to me was anonymous and tasteless— not a great fan of revolving restaurants so that did not do much for me. I prefer smaller more unique and historical hotels. Some prefer a brand look and style. One is not better than the other but they are different and one needs to choose the right one for their needs.

It is always better to do some research so as to avoid disappointment. No room service or coffee machines have been offered in years, and the size of the rooms is listed on the website.

Your post is confusing. How could you get an email the night before saying there was no room service or coffee maker when neither have been offered since 2016 or earlier? Or did you get the normal Marriott email reminder and only then look at the amenities? If the hotel does not offere amenities it has to hard to listen to complaints as to why they do not exist.

It is a good idea to research a hotel under the Autograph line they are not advertised as standard Marriotts.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
16,698
15,314
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#9
The Autograph hotels are those with a more historic atmosphere and not your corporate Marriott cookie cutter.

I looked at some online reviews. It appears there have not been coffee machines in the rooms or room service offered as far back as November 2016. This is mentioned again in March 2017 and other reviews.

The fact that the rooms are smaller is also mentioned in many reviews and the approximate square footage of rooms in mentioned. One can easily see that the least expensive rooms at the Marriott Marquis are about 100 some square feet larger than the equivalent at the Algonquin.

Some people prefer more historical and others want corporate predictability. The Autograph collection is not corporate predictability. I visited a friend staying at the Marriott Marquis which to me was anonymous and tasteless— not a great fan of revolving restaurants so that did not do much for me. I prefer smaller more unique and historical hotels. Some prefer a brand look and style. One is not better than the other but they are different and one needs to choose the right one for their needs.

It is always better to do some research so as to avoid disappointment. No room service or coffee machines have been offered in years, and the size of the rooms is listed on the website.

Your post is confusing. How could you get an email the night before saying there was no room service or coffee maker when neither have been offered since 2016 or earlier? Or did you get the normal Marriott email reminder and only then look at the amenities? If the hotel does not offere amenities it has to hard to listen to complaints as to why they do not exist.

It is a good idea to research a hotel under the Autograph line they are not advertised as standard Marriotts.
Good points. To our OP, if you have proof that these were in the hotel description when you booked I think you would have more success proving your point.
 
Jul 27, 2016
1,054
1,255
113
#10
do not make this hotel deserve the HIGHEST classification in the Marriott chain.
There are five category 9 hotels in NYC. Of these, the Algonquin is notably more expensive than average, and the second most expensive overall. It's the fourth most expensive Marriott hotel in NYC, after the Essex House (which is the only category 9 that's costlier than the Algonquin), the New York EDITION (60k points/night) and the Ritz Central Park South (70k points/night).

I certainly recognize that the Algonquin might not have been the best match for your needs, but, based on market rates for the rooms, it certainly isn't out of place in category 9.

Because I'm on the world's dullest conference call, I did five minutes of math. Looked at on a $/point basis, the Algonquin (using tonight as an example) is actually the fourth best deal on points redemptions in Manhattan. Overall, there are 29 Marriotts in Manhattan. The average point value is 0.89 cents per point. The Algonquin is 1.17 cents per point (45k points for a $528/night room), so you're actually getting very good value for your points redeeming there. The only better deals are the Ritz CPS (1.32c/point), New York Edition (1.40c/point), and JW Marriott (1.52c/point).
 
Last edited:
Jul 27, 2016
1,054
1,255
113
#11
Good points. To our OP, if you have proof that these were in the hotel description when you booked I think you would have more success proving your point.
Per this comment by hotel management on TripAdvisor, it looks like they dropped room service in December 2015, so it's not new. That said, I'd have been surprised to find a hotel of this caliber didn't have it, I sort of take it for granted that any hotel above the very low end has 24 hour room service.


Our room service department was discontinued since December 2015 due to extremely low demand. Our property is among a few others have discontinued room service in NYC.
https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUse...ograph_Collection-New_York_City_New_York.html
 
Likes: Neil Maley