Samsung isn't repairing or replacing my phone, by falsely alleging ''liquid damage and physical damage'.

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Aug 14, 2019
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#1
1. I already emailed Samsung's CEO and SVP based on the emails from your website. I received an alleged 'final decision' from Carlos C. (Team Manager, Executive Customer Relations, Samsung Electronics Canada).

2.My phone randomly heated up, and I sent it to Samsung for repair. I never spilled any liquid, but Samsung falsely alleged ''liquid damage and physical damage', which seems like pretext to evade responsibility.

3. Samsung should repair or replace it freely.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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www.promalvacations.com
#3
Is it under warranty? How old is it?

If you have written to the CEO and they issued you a final determination saying no- we can’t do anything else for you.

Our process is not to start at the top but start at the bottom and work your way up one by one
hoping to find an executive that might help. If you start at the top, no one under him or her can reverse it.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
18,799
17,000
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#5
How old is the phone?

Here is how we advise you to write:

https://forum.elliott.org/threads/resolving-consumer-complaints-and-developing-a-paper-trail.8903/

“I already emailed Samsung's CEO and SVP based on the emails from your website. I received an alleged 'final decision' from Carlos C. (Team Manager, Executive Customer Relations, Samsung Electronics Canada).”

Please clearly explain what you have done writing so far.

What damages did they find that makes them think it was wet? You have to write a letter that convinces the Executives that it was never wet.

Did you do research on the Internet for the problem that showed other possibilities? Are there other users who have had the same problems that were able to have it fixed? Did you ask the to verify the serial number to make sure it’s actually your phone they are reporting on and haven’t mixed up your phone with someone else’s?

We really need more information to help you craft a letter that proves you didn’t spill anything on the phone.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
8,397
8,503
113
San Francisco
#6
4. It's under warranty, but this isn't the problem. The problem is Samsung's false allegations.

5. Firstly, we don't know if Samsung's executives did intervene. They might've merely forwarded, without reading, my emails to junior staff.
We have been helping people solve consumer problems for years. Our method works. If you don't want to use our method because you have decided that the executives don't read emails and send them off to a junior employee, that's your perogative. I would suggest you try our method, it's worked for thousands of consumer issues. We are here to help, not argue.
 
Jan 11, 2019
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#7
Phones have liquid damage indicators inside the phone. It's usually near the sim card. It's my understanding that phones can get too damp just by taking them in the bathroom too frequently while showering. When the bathroom steams up, everything gets damp. The phone companies have found a way to keep people from claiming they have a bad phone and wanting a new one when in fact it was the consumer who caused the problem. I'm not saying you personally, but unfortunately it happens.
 
Feb 12, 2019
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#8
Phones have liquid damage indicators inside the phone. It's usually near the sim card. It's my understanding that phones can get too damp just by taking them in the bathroom too frequently while showering. When the bathroom steams up, everything gets damp. The phone companies have found a way to keep people from claiming they have a bad phone and wanting a new one when in fact it was the consumer who caused the problem. I'm not saying you personally, but unfortunately it happens.
It depends on what model he has. The Galaxy phones have been IPX8 since the S8 came out (waterproof up to 30 minutes in 1.5m of water). I've regularly submerged my S9 in the water with zero problems. The galaxy phones might still have liquid indicators, but on the newer models (the S8 came out 3 years ago, so for the galaxy line there would be no phone under Samsung's warranty that wasn't waterproof) they should only trip if there was a defect in the phone or enough damage to wreck the waterproofness of the phone.

I'm not sure of the waterproofness of other Samsung phones as I've only had Galaxys.
 
Likes: VoR61
Jan 11, 2019
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#9
Yeah
It depends on what model he has. The Galaxy phones have been IPX8 since the S8 came out (waterproof up to 30 minutes in 1.5m of water). I've regularly submerged my S9 in the water with zero problems. The galaxy phones might still have liquid indicators, but on the newer models (the S8 came out 3 years ago, so for the galaxy line there would be no phone under Samsung's warranty that wasn't waterproof) they should only trip if there was a defect in the phone or enough damage to wreck the waterproofness of the phone.

I'm not sure of the waterproofness of other Samsung phones as I've only had Galaxys.
I also have a Galaxy. He never stated how old his phone is or how long he's owned it. I tend to buy older models and keep it for 2 years. I have every phone I've ever owned and not one has ever broken. It amazes me how many people break or crack their screens etc..I suspect some of the younger teens just want the latest phones. :)
 
Feb 12, 2019
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#10
Yeah

I also have a Galaxy. He never stated how old his phone is or how long he's owned it. I tend to buy older models and keep it for 2 years. I have every phone I've ever owned and not one has ever broken. It amazes me how many people break or crack their screens etc..I suspect some of the younger teens just want the latest phones. :)
He said it was under warranty still and I believe Samsung only has a 1 year warranty. There might still be some old S7s around to still sell new if you look for them - they were barely around when I bought my S9 over a year ago so I was thinking based on that it was likely a newer model if it's a Galaxy since it's still under warranty.
 
Likes: VoR61