Revised Complaint

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Nov 27, 2020
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• Geico is responsible eg. When Geico recommended a collision center and then produced a lifetime guarantee for only the collision center recommended, excluding all others, they took direct responsibility for the care of my vehicle within the umbrella of their organization and are responsible for any increase in the total damage incurred originally; also, when the greater plausibility of the origin of said extra damage to my vehicle occurred while the claim was still open and while in care of Geico’s contracted establishment, the responsibility to me for said damage is Geico’s

• Geico is not upholding their obligation underwritten within their advertised policies eg. Lifetime guarantee; when the origin of said extra damage was incurred in their care, the open claim and damage incurred within is responsible for setting the parameters and conditions of the claim, in which any damage incurred within is part of the claim itself and subject to Geico’s Lifetime guarantee and should be treated as extra damage being a result to their responsibility and influence of the conditions of the initial accident (the accident happens and from initial contact all pursuing damages are atomically interconnected and are a result of the accident) found after reinspection of direct result, and Geico’s continuation of the claim and not opening a new one directly insinuates an acknowledgement of their comprehension of responsibility.

• Geico has behaved maliciously and in bad faith. eg. Geico instead of upholding their responsibility to me challenged the conditions of the oil prior to receiving my vehicle; while, the greater plausibility of the cause of the malfunction was evidently within the parameters of their organization’s activities eg. 1.The engine seizing on the same day within 30 to 50 miles of driving from Geico’s repair facility. 2.Geico having acknowledged themselves and witnessing myself the oil level being extremely low 3.Having communicated to Geico that the oil filter was loose and leaking and Geico acknowledging this to be factual. 4.Communicating to Geico that their was no oil spots in my parking space at home and them not investigating that condition in good faith. 5.Having provided receipts and transactions of transmission fluid, engine oil, and brake management using the OEM’s guidelines. 6.Witnessing a hand tight oil drain plug on the vehicle myself and expressing this to Geico after an Independent diagnostic center and Geico inspected the vehicle together not mentioning the loose drain plug and then me returning to the diagnostic center to find said drain plug tightened ; also, Geico’s bad faith, inhouse investigation and industry influence has tampered with the credibility of any witness(s) that may be called to testify in a court of law eg. Somebody retightening the oil drain plug while the vehicle was being inspected by and for Geico and not reporting it to me and communicating with automotive maintenance/repair facilities that I have charged with changing my oil/other tasks and reporting to me overexaggerated explanations and falsehoods of my vehicle’s maintenance; Furthermore, Geico not opening a claim with their business insurance provider in turn excluding the damage from the claim they provided and requesting the vehicle be inspected implicates their recognition and bad faith intent in withholding of their legal obligation.

I filed a claim on 10/27/2020 for an accident involving a parking block ripping off the front bumper, front skirt, and wheel well liners of my vehicle. After checking my schedule, an appointment was made for 11/03/2020 at Geico's repair facility here in Reno, NV.
When arriving at the contracted third party shop, that had Geico banners flying everywhere, somehow, the appointment date had been changed, without anyone's knowledge, to the following day. They took my vehicle anyway, and a shorter brute, after attending to another individual first, accompanied me outside to my vehicle to assess the work to be done. To start, he kept smacking his chops and rushing the process; like, he was over stimulated. After pointing things out that he had missed in his verbal assessment, his "over stimulated" interactions became slightly passive aggressive. We finished, and I left in a rental vehicle provided by an awesome lady from Enterprise. I pay for the rental through my policy.
After receiving a completion date of Fri, 11/06/2020, I returned to the collision repair center to retrieve my vehicle. I was headed toward the work area, as the receptionist had offered, when a taller gentleman intervened and denied me access; stating, "your car will be finished in a couple of hours." I returned the following morning for my vehicle and was, once again, treated like third class from the original brute. He handed me unfilled out paperwork and, in retrospect, rushed me out of there with a slight gold tooth grin on his face. I drove the vehicle home and parked it until evening.
Saturday night, I decide to cruise around and check out the scene. I start off in Sparks and cruise to Reno (small sister cities). I head over to a friends house, after leaving the downtown area, to make some plans; suddenly, I hear a clacking sound; immediately, I recognize my engine has a broken rod, so I creep my car to a safe area, thinking, those guys sabotaged my vehicle, where my engine seizes and stalls. I hadn’t driven more than 30 miles. I call Geico for roadside assistance and explain my situation, including my suspicions, to a lady in Georgia who then transferred me to a gentleman in Washington. This guy immediately starts bombarding me with negative insinuating questions; I hurry up and ask him to finish helping with my roadside assistance. He apologizes for the last person not having already done so, and he asks me my location. He tells me to wait on the line while he handles the details and then...HANGS UP! I call back; this time, I explain to a lady in San Diego what had just transpired, and she didn't even have a record of the previous correspondence. I mean, they have to have a call log, right? I do. I re-explained my situation to her, and she transferred me to her supervisor who was very sympathetic. She assured me Geico would take responsibility, but I had to talk with the adjuster assigned on Monday. She then offered me an extension on my previous claim's rental. Thankfully, the tow truck showed. My phone was dead. I get the car home, and go to bed.
The next day, I checked the oil dipstick and there was nothing registering, so I get my 1 ton automobile jack, ratchet, socket, extension, and a cut up milk jug and get under my vehicle. I go to remove the drain plug, and it's hand tight. I proceed to drain a quarter of a quart of oil out to check its condition, which I'll admit was dark, but I use full synthetic, so the viscosity was still very much intact. It was on one jack stand, and it took a full minute to drain that little of an amount.
On Monday, I finally got into a rental car, and I was able to talk to the insurance adjuster assigned to the claim. I had my vehicle towed later that week. This guy shows up in a flat bed version truck of the same company that originally towed my vehicle. He tows me to an Auto Diagnostic Center that he, owns? I went to the new shop the next day and the manager told me he couldn't get the car in the air for a couple of days. I returned to a couple of days, and walked under the vehicle with him, he didn't mention the oil drain plug that I had left hand tight, as I had found it. I left and came back days later after my vehicle was inspected by Geico and their collision shop. I reached up, and the oil plug was tight. I left and relayed all this information to the insurance adjuster and then went back and asked the guy, "who tightened the drain plug?" and he says, immediately, "I'll take a lie detector test." I then ask him about the other individuals that had been around my vehicle inspecting it. And don't you know, he was just to quick to defend them and bring up his skills in videography.
When dealing with the third adjuster, I gave him the information for the last shop that did a complete oil change and transmission flush. I also texted him photos of a receipt of when I personally topped off the oil and changed my pads in late July (you know, with things being tight because of COVID19)
Now, after communicating with the district manager, I have been informed that Geico doesn’t want to take responsibility and that their cause is a partisan misrepresented version of my engine maintenance history; which time line goes as such:
1. I got a complete oil changed last winter (my vehicle sits sometimes for weeks especially since the COVID19 outbreak)
2. In mid July I had my vehicle towed to a shop for front brake pads when the squealer pin malfunctioned in my apartment complex’s parking lot and didn’t warn me of what condition my brakes were in; subsequently, I was told my oil was registering low on the dipstick, and they wanted to charge me $800.00 for new front brake pads and rotors and oil.
3. I went to Pep Boys and bought brake pads (front and back), rotors (front and back), quart of oil, a star wrench, a glow stick, and a pink sun shade and pink mace for my girlfriend for less than $300 dollars.
4. I had the vehicle towed from the shop ($800.00 was too expensive) to a place where I could work on the brakes. I only needed to replace the front brake pads and add 1/2 quart of oil as that was all that was needed. The oil was still in good condition, and I was still showing a percentage of miles to be driven until my next oil change on my information display which may have been reset some miles after receiving my last oil change because I noticed it hadn’t been reset do to me sitting in the vehicle while the work was being performed (Chevrolet recommends checking the oil and changing, if necessary, every 7500 miles). I kept the remainder of the oil, rotors, and rear brake pads for when they are needed.

• To show the nature of the industry and character of networked individuals involved, I was recommended to the auto diagnostic center by an auto body shop that saved my vehicle previously. That time, State Farm's preferred body shop "jacked" the repair price "up" from $4000 to $12000 and tried to get my vehicle totaled. There was some bumper damage and a small ding in the lower bottom support side of my front passenger cabin (I struck a railroad track getting out of an ambulance's and garbage truck's path). That guy didn't even do the work that warranted the lump sum of the price increase from the original estimate the other shop had over inflated, ~but he kept all but 2000 of the check State Farm issued him and I~. I used the rebated $2000 to pay for the rental I had to purchase for 30 days, which was somehow ~miraculously~ the same amount.
• I still have the tiny amount of oil I drained, to check its viscosity (which is still very much good), out of my car, for myself.
• There is still no oil in my parking space which my car spends extended amounts of time in.

Desired Outcome:
For GEICO to repair my vehicle to, at minimum, the condition it was in prior to leaving it in their care.
 
Last edited:
Jul 13, 2016
586
1,375
58
In your earlier post, we told you what you should do-shorten the letter and use the contacts found here:
https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/geico/
Email the first person on the list. If you have no reply in 5-7 days, email the second, copying the first. Again, wait 5-7 days. If, after you have gone through each of the contacts, without success, you may ask for intervention from the Elliott team.
 
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jmv

Mar 6, 2019
40
103
60
Even though you have made a bulleted list, it is still essentially unreadable. It probably won't get you anywhere with Geico, since they are not likely to read it. You need to shorten to the point that each bullet point is only one or two sentences.
 

Neil Maley

Staff Member
Forum Moderator
Dec 27, 2014
25,861
28,983
New York
www.promalvacations.com
Closing this thread. You received advice on your closed thread on how to proceed. Please read #7 in this about reposting once a thread has been closed.

 
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jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
11,039
13,213
San Francisco
• Geico is responsible eg. When Geico recommended a collision center and then produced a lifetime guarantee for only the collision center recommended, excluding all others, they took direct responsibility for the care of my vehicle within the umbrella of their organization and are responsible for any increase in the total damage incurred originally; also, when the greater plausibility of the origin of said extra damage to my vehicle occurred while the claim was still open and while in care of Geico’s contracted establishment, the responsibility to me for said damage is Geico’s

• Geico is not upholding their obligation underwritten within their advertised policies eg. Lifetime guarantee; when the origin of said extra damage was incurred in their care, the open claim and damage incurred within is responsible for setting the parameters and conditions of the claim, in which any damage incurred within is part of the claim itself and subject to Geico’s Lifetime guarantee and should be treated as extra damage being a result to their responsibility and influence of the conditions of the initial accident (the accident happens and from initial contact all pursuing damages are atomically interconnected and are a result of the accident) found after reinspection of direct result, and Geico’s continuation of the claim and not opening a new one directly insinuates an acknowledgement of their comprehension of responsibility.

• Geico has behaved maliciously and in bad faith. eg. Geico instead of upholding their responsibility to me challenged the conditions of the oil prior to receiving my vehicle; while, the greater plausibility of the cause of the malfunction was evidently within the parameters of their organization’s activities eg. 1.The engine seizing on the same day within 30 to 50 miles of driving from Geico’s repair facility. 2.Geico having acknowledged themselves and witnessing myself the oil level being extremely low 3.Having communicated to Geico that the oil filter was loose and leaking and Geico acknowledging this to be factual. 4.Communicating to Geico that their was no oil spots in my parking space at home and them not investigating that condition in good faith. 5.Having provided receipts and transactions of transmission fluid, engine oil, and brake management using the OEM’s guidelines. 6.Witnessing a hand tight oil drain plug on the vehicle myself and expressing this to Geico after an Independent diagnostic center and Geico inspected the vehicle together not mentioning the loose drain plug and then me returning to the diagnostic center to find said drain plug tightened ; also, Geico’s bad faith, inhouse investigation and industry influence has tampered with the credibility of any witness(s) that may be called to testify in a court of law eg. Somebody retightening the oil drain plug while the vehicle was being inspected by and for Geico and not reporting it to me and communicating with automotive maintenance/repair facilities that I have charged with changing my oil/other tasks and reporting to me overexaggerated explanations and falsehoods of my vehicle’s maintenance; Furthermore, Geico not opening a claim with their business insurance provider in turn excluding the damage from the claim they provided and requesting the vehicle be inspected implicates their recognition and bad faith intent in withholding of their legal obligation.

I filed a claim on 10/27/2020 for an accident involving a parking block ripping off the front bumper, front skirt, and wheel well liners of my vehicle. After checking my schedule, an appointment was made for 11/03/2020 at Geico's repair facility here in Reno, NV.
When arriving at the contracted third party shop, that had Geico banners flying everywhere, somehow, the appointment date had been changed, without anyone's knowledge, to the following day. They took my vehicle anyway, and a shorter brute, after attending to another individual first, accompanied me outside to my vehicle to assess the work to be done. To start, he kept smacking his chops and rushing the process; like, he was over stimulated. After pointing things out that he had missed in his verbal assessment, his "over stimulated" interactions became slightly passive aggressive. We finished, and I left in a rental vehicle provided by an awesome lady from Enterprise. I pay for the rental through my policy.
After receiving a completion date of Fri, 11/06/2020, I returned to the collision repair center to retrieve my vehicle. I was headed toward the work area, as the receptionist had offered, when a taller gentleman intervened and denied me access; stating, "your car will be finished in a couple of hours." I returned the following morning for my vehicle and was, once again, treated like third class from the original brute. He handed me unfilled out paperwork and, in retrospect, rushed me out of there with a slight gold tooth grin on his face. I drove the vehicle home and parked it until evening.
Saturday night, I decide to cruise around and check out the scene. I start off in Sparks and cruise to Reno (small sister cities). I head over to a friends house, after leaving the downtown area, to make some plans; suddenly, I hear a clacking sound; immediately, I recognize my engine has a broken rod, so I creep my car to a safe area, thinking, those guys sabotaged my vehicle, where my engine seizes and stalls. I hadn’t driven more than 30 miles. I call Geico for roadside assistance and explain my situation, including my suspicions, to a lady in Georgia who then transferred me to a gentleman in Washington. This guy immediately starts bombarding me with negative insinuating questions; I hurry up and ask him to finish helping with my roadside assistance. He apologizes for the last person not having already done so, and he asks me my location. He tells me to wait on the line while he handles the details and then...HANGS UP! I call back; this time, I explain to a lady in San Diego what had just transpired, and she didn't even have a record of the previous correspondence. I mean, they have to have a call log, right? I do. I re-explained my situation to her, and she transferred me to her supervisor who was very sympathetic. She assured me Geico would take responsibility, but I had to talk with the adjuster assigned on Monday. She then offered me an extension on my previous claim's rental. Thankfully, the tow truck showed. My phone was dead. I get the car home, and go to bed.
The next day, I checked the oil dipstick and there was nothing registering, so I get my 1 ton automobile jack, ratchet, socket, extension, and a cut up milk jug and get under my vehicle. I go to remove the drain plug, and it's hand tight. I proceed to drain a quarter of a quart of oil out to check its condition, which I'll admit was dark, but I use full synthetic, so the viscosity was still very much intact. It was on one jack stand, and it took a full minute to drain that little of an amount.
On Monday, I finally got into a rental car, and I was able to talk to the insurance adjuster assigned to the claim. I had my vehicle towed later that week. This guy shows up in a flat bed version truck of the same company that originally towed my vehicle. He tows me to an Auto Diagnostic Center that he, owns? I went to the new shop the next day and the manager told me he couldn't get the car in the air for a couple of days. I returned to a couple of days, and walked under the vehicle with him, he didn't mention the oil drain plug that I had left hand tight, as I had found it. I left and came back days later after my vehicle was inspected by Geico and their collision shop. I reached up, and the oil plug was tight. I left and relayed all this information to the insurance adjuster and then went back and asked the guy, "who tightened the drain plug?" and he says, immediately, "I'll take a lie detector test." I then ask him about the other individuals that had been around my vehicle inspecting it. And don't you know, he was just to quick to defend them and bring up his skills in videography.
When dealing with the third adjuster, I gave him the information for the last shop that did a complete oil change and transmission flush. I also texted him photos of a receipt of when I personally topped off the oil and changed my pads in late July (you know, with things being tight because of COVID19)
Now, after communicating with the district manager, I have been informed that Geico doesn’t want to take responsibility and that their cause is a partisan misrepresented version of my engine maintenance history; which time line goes as such:
1. I got a complete oil changed last winter (my vehicle sits sometimes for weeks especially since the COVID19 outbreak)
2. In mid July I had my vehicle towed to a shop for front brake pads when the squealer pin malfunctioned in my apartment complex’s parking lot and didn’t warn me of what condition my brakes were in; subsequently, I was told my oil was registering low on the dipstick, and they wanted to charge me $800.00 for new front brake pads and rotors and oil.
3. I went to Pep Boys and bought brake pads (front and back), rotors (front and back), quart of oil, a star wrench, a glow stick, and a pink sun shade and pink mace for my girlfriend for less than $300 dollars.
4. I had the vehicle towed from the shop ($800.00 was too expensive) to a place where I could work on the brakes. I only needed to replace the front brake pads and add 1/2 quart of oil as that was all that was needed. The oil was still in good condition, and I was still showing a percentage of miles to be driven until my next oil change on my information display which may have been reset some miles after receiving my last oil change because I noticed it hadn’t been reset do to me sitting in the vehicle while the work was being performed (Chevrolet recommends checking the oil and changing, if necessary, every 7500 miles). I kept the remainder of the oil, rotors, and rear brake pads for when they are needed.

• To show the nature of the industry and character of networked individuals involved, I was recommended to the auto diagnostic center by an auto body shop that saved my vehicle previously. That time, State Farm's preferred body shop "jacked" the repair price "up" from $4000 to $12000 and tried to get my vehicle totaled. There was some bumper damage and a small ding in the lower bottom support side of my front passenger cabin (I struck a railroad track getting out of an ambulance's and garbage truck's path). That guy didn't even do the work that warranted the lump sum of the price increase from the original estimate the other shop had over inflated, ~but he kept all but 2000 of the check State Farm issued him and I~. I used the rebated $2000 to pay for the rental I had to purchase for 30 days, which was somehow ~miraculously~ the same amount.
• I still have the tiny amount of oil I drained, to check its viscosity (which is still very much good), out of my car, for myself.
• There is still no oil in my parking space which my car spends extended amounts of time in.

Desired Outcome:
For GEICO to repair my vehicle to, at minimum, the condition it was in prior to leaving it in their care.
I'm not sure I understand what's going on here, but this post is unreadable. Even your first line doesn't make sense: "Geico is responsible eg.". Your mission is to explain your problem. You will get nowhere until you produce a readable letter. Make a list of the FACTS in chronological order. Use proper grammar and punctuation. If we can understand the situation, we may be able to help.
 

Comicman

Jul 13, 2020
857
1,796
I have to wonder how you prove how the oil drain plus was loosened. Could it not have happened when you hit the curb?
If that is the case would it not be covered by your comprehensive part of your auto insurance. Seems a lot more likely and much easier to make a claim against your comprehensive coverage then proving a garage damaged your car.
 
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Nov 27, 2020
11
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I'm not sure I understand what's going on here, but this post is unreadable. Even your first line doesn't make sense: "Geico is responsible eg.". Your mission is to explain your problem. You will get nowhere until you produce a readable letter. Make a list of the FACTS in chronological order. Use proper grammar and punctuation. If we can understand the situation, we may be able to help.
Thank you for your advice.
 
Nov 27, 2020
11
0
46
I have to wonder how you prove how the oil drain plus was loosened. Could it not have happened when you hit the curb?
If that is the case would it not be covered by your comprehensive part of your auto insurance. Seems a lot more likely and much easier to make a claim against your comprehensive coverage then proving a garage damaged your car.
I'm just reporting the facts. Thank you for your advice.
 
Nov 27, 2020
11
0
46
I apologize for the grammatical errors. I recognize this article needs to be edited before any official or legal correspondence.
 

Skippy

May 30, 2019
897
2,392
Referring back to the original thread and the prior post ... There is a distinction a letter/email being read and a letter/email being understood and considered. The goals of a letter/email to an executive is to get their attention quickly and get their consideration of your needs. To accomplish that, it is important to be clear, brief, succinct, and sincere.

Dealing a company that is not helping you is a frustrating experience. Still, it doesn't help to vent the frustrations on the company. If you accuse Geico of acting in bad faith in an email, then the people who receive it are likely to be more defensive. If you focus on what you want and why you should get it in your communication, then you are more likely get that.

(For others' reference, the original thread is here: https://forum.elliott.org/threads/geico-bad-faith-insurance-claim.13529/)
 
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Nov 27, 2019
202
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OK, here's my shot at a summary of this:

On 10/27, you were in an crash, and submitted a claim to Geico.
You took the car to XYZ body shop, because Geico provided a lifetime guarantee for work done at that collision center.
On 11/6, you received your car back from the body shop.
On 11/7, while you were driving, your car's engine seized.

You believe that the engine seized because the body shop loosened the oil plug, resulting in the oil draining from the engine. Since Geico sent you to the body shop, you believe Geico should bear the cost of repairing the engine. Geico disagrees, saying that the engine seizure is the result of a lack of proper maintenance on your part, and that they aren't responsible.

Is this correct?
 

VoR61

Jan 6, 2015
4,063
6,490
the United States
In this forum, c75stone, composing a letter to an executive involves both brevity and civility. The specifics of the advice offered by other members may vary, but the recommended approach will include those two characteristics. The challenge is to identify the most important points to send to the company.

In your case, the details you have posted here total almost 2,000 words, which will likely take the average person longer than 15 minutes to read. What my colleagues have advised in your prior thread is for you to summarize in a way that is easily read and processed, along with being polite. I recognize that you are frustrated, but the advice here will be to let the facts speak for themselves and lead them to the proper conclusion. It is also vital to submit a reasonable request to avoid rejection. These, of course, will be somewhat subjective.

For your consideration, I have composed a suggested email based on the information you have shared with us:

I am writing to you today because my efforts to resolve an issue with Geico's repair facility have been unsuccessful. Here are the details:​
  • I filed a claim on October 27, 2020 for an accident that removed the front bumper, front skirt, and wheel well liners of my vehicle
  • The appointment was made for November 3, 2020 at Geico's repair facility here in Reno, NV
  • I returned on November 7th to retrieve the vehicle and was given incomplete paperwork
  • That evening I drove to a friend's house (less than 30 miles), and hear a clacking sound and direct my car to a safe area where my engine seizes and stalls
  • I contacted Geico for roadside assistance and was disconnected. On a second call I was advised there was no record of the previous call.
  • A supervisor then assured me that Geico would take responsibility, but indicated that I had to talk with the adjuster assigned on Monday
  • My vehicle was towed home, and the next day I decided to check the oil dipstick but nothing registered. I discovered that the oil plug was only hand tight.
  • Later that week my vehicle was towed to Auto Diagnostic Center that the driver owns and was advised that it would be several days
  • After my vehicle was inspected by Geico and their collision shop I reached up and the oil plug was now firmly in place (no longer hand tight)
  • When dealing with a third adjuster, I gave him the information for the last shop that did a complete oil change and transmission flush. I also texted him photos of a receipt of when I personally topped off the oil (1/2 quart) in late July.
  • Now, after communicating with the district manager, I have been informed that Geico denies responsibility for the damage caused by the loose oil plug
I am confident that the aforementioned damage occurred while my vehicle was in the care of a Geico facility, and I am requesting of you that Geico affect repair at no cost to me.​
Thank you for your time and consideration​

I believe that the above text captures the essence of your timeline and experience, and can be read and processed quickly. Derisive comments about Geico personnel will, I believe, detract from the main issue and may derail your case. Even if your stated accusations are correct, their inclusion may have the opposite affect you are seeking - to convince them to grant your request.

You can appeal this using the email addresses in this link: Geico Contacts
CRITICAL: start at the lowest level, and give each contact one (1) week to respond before escalating to the next level
• if you have done so already, please update this thread with the one(s) you have contacted
• if an email "bounces", report that specific contact to us using this link: Request a Correction

I hope you are successful. Please tell us when you have begun writing and also keep us posted on your progress . . .
 
Nov 27, 2020
11
0
46
Referring back to the original thread and the prior post ... There is a distinction a letter/email being read and a letter/email being understood and considered. The goals of a letter/email to an executive is to get their attention quickly and get their consideration of your needs. To accomplish that, it is important to be clear, brief, succinct, and sincere.

Dealing a company that is not helping you is a frustrating experience. Still, it doesn't help to vent the frustrations on the company. If you accuse Geico of acting in bad faith in an email, then the people who receive it are likely to be more defensive. If you focus on what you want and why you should get it in your communication, then you are more likely get that.

(For others' reference, the original thread is here: https://forum.elliott.org/threads/geico-bad-faith-insurance-claim.13529/)
In this forum, c75stone, composing a letter to an executive involves both brevity and civility. The specifics of the advice offered by other members may vary, but the recommended approach will include those two characteristics. The challenge is to identify the most important points to send to the company.

In your case, the details you have posted here total almost 2,000 words, which will likely take the average person longer than 15 minutes to read. What my colleagues have advised in your prior thread is for you to summarize in a way that is easily read and processed, along with being polite. I recognize that you are frustrated, but the advice here will be to let the facts speak for themselves and lead them to the proper conclusion. It is also vital to submit a reasonable request to avoid rejection. These, of course, will be somewhat subjective.

For your consideration, I have composed a suggested email based on the information you have shared with us:

I am writing to you today because my efforts to resolve an issue with Geico's repair facility have been unsuccessful. Here are the details:​
  • I filed a claim on October 27, 2020 for an accident that removed the front bumper, front skirt, and wheel well liners of my vehicle
  • The appointment was made for November 3, 2020 at Geico's repair facility here in Reno, NV
  • I returned on November 7th to retrieve the vehicle and was given incomplete paperwork
  • That evening I drove to a friend's house (less than 30 miles), and hear a clacking sound and direct my car to a safe area where my engine seizes and stalls
  • I contacted Geico for roadside assistance and was disconnected. On a second call I was advised there was no record of the previous call.
  • A supervisor then assured me that Geico would take responsibility, but indicated that I had to talk with the adjuster assigned on Monday
  • My vehicle was towed home, and the next day I decided to check the oil dipstick but nothing registered. I discovered that the oil plug was only hand tight.
  • Later that week my vehicle was towed to Auto Diagnostic Center that the driver owns and was advised that it would be several days
  • After my vehicle was inspected by Geico and their collision shop I reached up and the oil plug was now firmly in place (no longer hand tight)
  • When dealing with a third adjuster, I gave him the information for the last shop that did a complete oil change and transmission flush. I also texted him photos of a receipt of when I personally topped off the oil (1/2 quart) in late July.
  • Now, after communicating with the district manager, I have been informed that Geico denies responsibility for the damage caused by the loose oil plug
I am confident that the aforementioned damage occurred while my vehicle was in the care of a Geico facility, and I am requesting of you that Geico affect repair at no cost to me.​
Thank you for your time and consideration​

I believe that the above text captures the essence of your timeline and experience, and can be read and processed quickly. Derisive comments about Geico personnel will, I believe, detract from the main issue and may derail your case. Even if your stated accusations are correct, their inclusion may have the opposite affect you are seeking - to convince them to grant your request.

You can appeal this using the email addresses in this link:Geico Contacts
CRITICAL: start at the lowest level, and give each contact one (1) week to respond before escalating to the next level
• if you have done so already, please update this thread with the one(s) you have contacted
• if an email "bounces", report that specific contact to us using this link: Request a Correction

I hope you are successful. Please tell us when you have begun writing and also keep us posted on your progress . . .
I understand that my article is rather descriptive but that's because Geico representatives from the dm down have already influenced the subject matter. I want to connect with the reader so as to define my position in greater detail considering the VP in MD has associated and built relationships with the majority involved.
 

Neil Maley

Staff Member
Forum Moderator
Dec 27, 2014
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New York
www.promalvacations.com
I understand that my article is rather descriptive but that's because Geico representatives from the dm down have already influenced the subject matter. I want to connect with the reader so as to define my position in greater detail considering the VP in MD has associated and built relationships with the majority involved.
VOR has re-written your letter for you in post #14. That is what you should send to Geico.
 
Nov 27, 2019
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561
I understand that my article is rather descriptive but that's because Geico representatives from the dm down have already influenced the subject matter. I want to connect with the reader so as to define my position in greater detail considering the VP in MD has associated and built relationships with the majority involved.

Nobody is forcing you to take the advice you're getting. You're entirely welcome to send Geico the original letter you posted above.
 

Skippy

May 30, 2019
897
2,392
I understand that my article is rather descriptive but that's because Geico representatives from the dm down have already influenced the subject matter. I want to connect with the reader so as to define my position in greater detail considering the VP in MD has associated and built relationships with the majority involved.

I used to be "that person" who read escalated complaint letters. When I had time from my busy schedule, I tried to go through the complaints. If I received an email like the one you composed, if I had time, I'd take a highlighter to it to try to find the key points to determine: what was the issue? how can we resolve it? do I need to refer this to someone who can solve the problem or to the in-house counsel? is there an opportunity for a goodwill gesture, or should we be defensive?

References to the demeaner of one person, i.e. "To start, he kept smacking his chops and rushing the process; like, he was over stimulated. After pointing things out that he had missed in his verbal assessment, his "over stimulated" interactions became slightly passive aggressive.", I would cross that out to try to find the key message.

Should I see a sentence reading, " (Your company) has behaved maliciously and in bad faith," that rules out goodwill or a referral to a callback from customer service leader. In other words, I wouldn't have read your letter in it's entirety. I would have referred it to counsel or given it a stock reply.

The best advice I can offer is to try a letter like Post #14. Why? "That person" at Geico is likely as busy as I was.

Hope this helps -- I wish you the best.
 

AMA

Verified Member
Dec 11, 2014
1,379
2,070
I returned the following morning for my vehicle and was, once again, treated like third class from the original brute. He handed me unfilled out paperwork and, in retrospect, rushed me out of there with a slight gold tooth grin on his face.

You are not going to get anywhere with slurs like this. It's a guarantee your letter will be tossed in the shredder. Follow VOR61's advice to the letter and you may end up with some sort of resolution. Insults and offensive language are not going to help your cause.
 
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