Promotional mail from Verizon for my daughter who does not live with me

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Feb 11, 2018
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#22
I still get mail for my son who left this earth over 20 yrs ago. The silly mom in me sees each piece of mail as a hello from him. At one point he got a Federal Jury Summons to serve. I gleefully filled it out on his behalf and asked them to have him come see me if he contacted them. That’s was a great day :)

It’s all perception and life is just too short to worry about junk mail for other family members or anyone else. Let it go! The selling of mailing lists is big business and getting a name removed is nearly impossible.
Now I really need to go check my mail for another hello but they are few and far between these days!

PS I get those Viking pieces too!
A jury summons? Their database is a wee bit out of date. If I got something important for a deceased person I would forward it to the cemetery, or, better yet, inform the sender of the "new" address. And the Viking stuff? Used to be nearly every day, not so much anymore.
 

JVillegirl541

Verified Member
Nov 21, 2014
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#23
A jury summons? Their database is a wee bit out of date. If I got something important for a deceased person I would forward it to the cemetery, or, better yet, inform the sender of the "new" address. And the Viking stuff? Used to be nearly every day, not so much anymore.
Yes a Federal Jury Questionnaire :) it arrived on a day i must have really needed a chuckle!
 
Likes: Pixie Pie
Jan 6, 2015
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#24
From the VoR "Oh my, should I?" file:

Save them all in a mid-size box, and when the box is full, take them to the Marlton, NJ Verizon office and ask for the manager (call ahead to verify the manager's hours). When he/she appears, explain the problem and then turn the box over and dump the contents on the floor. Finish by saying "See you again next month!".

After all it's only 130 miles away . . .
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#25
When it comes to Viking ... and GrandCircle as well ... just write them a polite note and the mailings will stop. At least they did with Grand Circle. It's a quick way to take care of those catalogues.

As for the IRS, I'm sure you can notify them, mmb, the same way. The entity to which they are addressed will be grateful ... whatever the IRS is threatening them with could escalate into something really nasty if the mail is ignored. Just consider it your civic duty while you build some good karma.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#27
When it comes to Viking ... and GrandCircle as well ... just write them a polite note and the mailings will stop. At least they did with Grand Circle. It's a quick way to take care of those catalogues.

As for the IRS, I'm sure you can notify them, mmb, the same way. The entity to which they are addressed will be grateful ... whatever the IRS is threatening them with could escalate into something really nasty if the mail is ignored. Just consider it your civic duty while you build some good karma.
I wonder if Viking/Grand Circle are like LaQuinta, in that they add you back to the list everytime you book with them . . .
 
Oct 18, 2018
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#28
Here's the joke: not only the OP but all of the above (including me) wasted time on this "mosquito in the backyard." Modern life (like strolling in the park) comes with its share of mosquitos and other annoyances. You can take these as a personal affront (from nature? from Viking? whatever!) or you can ignore them and focus on your own goals. Perhaps some of us are not made for modern life. Move to the north pole - no mail, no bugs, and your neighbor is Santa Claus. (I did not post my own address as I don't want to start getting mail for the Clauses again.)
 
Likes: Patina

Patina

Verified Member
Dec 22, 2015
1,369
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#29
I understand the OPs annoyance but sometimes we need to look at the amount of time we put into trying to change something that’s annoying when the easiest thing to do is just throw it out.

My father in law made my wife and his granddaughters crazy when my mother in law died contacting magazine subscriptions to stop them from being delivered to the house. It was too painful for him to see mail coming for her. Every time one came someone had the task of contacting the company and stopping the subscription or changing it to one of them for the remainder of the subscription time.
That reason I can understand. Sometimes its the ordinary things that can bring you to your knees in grief.
 

Patina

Verified Member
Dec 22, 2015
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#30
If you think getting junk mail for another person is annoying, just take a Viking Cruise! Our last Viking Cruise was in 2014, and we STILL get oodles of full-color brochures in all different sizes, along with letters and postcards. We did put a stop to the endless emails but have been unable to stop the ongoing paper train that results in the delivery of some promotional material at least once a week. Who knows how many trees have been sacrificed for Viking's efforts to get us aboard one of their ships.
We've never been on a cruise and they send us a brochure about once month!
 
Likes: jsn55

Patina

Verified Member
Dec 22, 2015
1,369
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#31
I still get mail for my son who left this earth over 20 yrs ago. The silly mom in me sees each piece of mail as a hello from him. At one point he got a Federal Jury Summons to serve. I gleefully filled it out on his behalf and asked them to have him come see me if he contacted them. That’s was a great day :)

It’s all perception and life is just too short to worry about junk mail for other family members or anyone else. Let it go! The selling of mailing lists is big business and getting a name removed is nearly impossible.
Now I really need to go check my mail for another hello but they are few and far between these days!

PS I get those Viking pieces too!
Bless your heart.......that is a wonderful way of looking at it.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#32
Over time I too have changed my response to mailers. Sometimes, as Neil said, I got caught up in what I call "the privacy frustration". 20 years ago it made little difference, but today every piece of information about me that's "out there" is an opportunity for identity theft.

So each time mail came with my name and address on it, I could not just throw it away out of concern about the "print". I pursued resolution with great passion, and oh the nonsense I heard. "The post office makes these up". I new better, but checked anyway. The result? "No, of course not. The only thing we do is provide email addresses when requested (per the law)."

So I call them back and state emphatically that the mailer (about 1-2 per week) was designed by them and that they control the distro. Finally they fess up to having a marketing manager that contracts out the printing/mailing. So I request that they "tell" the contractor to do a blind mailing (no names or addresses) to the various zip codes.

And so on. I really hated pursuing it, but I hated more shredding everything or throwing it away. It was my time they were sucking up!

Fast forward a few years and I no longer call anyone unless they are relentless (see AARP). My name and address can be looked up online in seconds so I generally throw mail away without shredding. And I always throw away marketing mail with no name.

One item I remain diligent about, however, is mail that might include a card of some kind. Those get opened and shredded so no one can open an account in my name using that piece of mail.

Bottom line: unless I'm flooded with mail (see also LaQuinta) or the mail is potentially risky (called Citibank to be removed), I just feed my recycle container. And we're both much happier.

I still wish Congress would outlaw mass mailings with names and addresses though . . .
 
Likes: jsmithw

mmb

Verified Member
Jan 20, 2015
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#35
I have sent both pieces of mail back to IRS as I have no way to contact the named business. No record of it anywhere.
It remains to be seen if IRS gets the ‘message’ or will continue to send notices to our address.
 
Jun 27, 2017
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#36
We did write a nice polite note to Viking about their numerous emails and printed materials. More than once we did this. The emails didn't stop immediately. We kept reporting them as SPAM and they finally did stop. But the printed materials ... they still flood our mailbox. When people ask if we have ever taken a river trip, we say yes. They say they want to do a VIKING River Cruise. We reply, "Maybe not. Their boats don't float very well in low water levels. They are many other river cruise lines. Get a travel agent and try any of the others instead." Many TAs don't particularly like Viking (ours does not).
 
Oct 10, 2015
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#37
Back when I was y ounger and had more time on my hands I would take business reply prepaid envelopes out of some junk mail and put pieces of another junk mail in them and mail them off.

Which gives me a new idea today: For first class mail I could hand write a forwarding address of another junk mailer and drop it in a blue public mailbox.

Hmmmm. Wonder what happens if a single (an orphaned) presorted first class mail item is "found" in a location neither close to the origin nor close to the destination. Would extra postage to make it up to standard first class be charged to somebody?
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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New York
www.promalvacations.com
#38
We did write a nice polite note to Viking about their numerous emails and printed materials. More than once we did this. The emails didn't stop immediately. We kept reporting them as SPAM and they finally did stop. But the printed materials ... they still flood our mailbox. When people ask if we have ever taken a river trip, we say yes. They say they want to do a VIKING River Cruise. We reply, "Maybe not. Their boats don't float very well in low water levels. They are many other river cruise lines. Get a travel agent and try any of the others instead." Many TAs don't particularly like Viking (ours does not).
Neither do we. There are far better lines that people don’t know about because they don’t advertise. And they don’t have to because the ships fill a year in advance.
 
Feb 11, 2018
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#39
Back when I was y ounger and had more time on my hands I would take business reply prepaid envelopes out of some junk mail and put pieces of another junk mail in them and mail them off.

Which gives me a new idea today: For first class mail I could hand write a forwarding address of another junk mailer and drop it in a blue public mailbox.

Hmmmm. Wonder what happens if a single (an orphaned) presorted first class mail item is "found" in a location neither close to the origin nor close to the destination. Would extra postage to make it up to standard first class be charged to somebody?
Your post reminded me of a story I heard. Some junk mailings include postpaid return envelopes, and this person would wrap the envelope around a brick and mail it back. Don't know if it worked, or even if it was true, but it's a great story.
 
Likes: jsn55
Jan 6, 2015
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#40
Perhaps you or your daughter should fill out a forwarding request at your post office. Good for a year, but Verizon's mailers will stop for that period . . .