One-Aisle vs. Two-Aisle planes

  • Hi Guest, welcome to the help forum. You can get fast answers to your customer service questions here. We have a dedicated team of advocates who are ready to help. Just go to the section that matches your question and ask us!
  • If you've posted a question or issue for our advocates to assist with, please be sure to check back frequently for responses and requests for clarification.
  • Did you know you can get email notifications when something new posts to your favorite forum? It's easy. Just click the "watch" link right next to the "post new thread" button at the top of your favorite forum. The rest is easy. Now you'll never miss another conversation.
  • Want to become an expert user? Drop by the How to use this forum section and all will be revealed. We'll show you how to make the most of your experience.
Jun 26, 2018
4
1
3
81
#1
Due to a potential blood-clotting condition, my doctor has advised that I get up and walk a little every 30 minutes or so on flights. Therefore, I always book on two-aisle planes (I live in Hawaii and so I am talking about 5-11 hour flights). However, there have been times when after my booking the plane changes to a one-aisle plane. It is next to impossible to get up and walk in a one-aisle plane. You have to walk sideways to avoid hitting people and there are people backed up at the toilets. My question is: If I book on a two-aisle plane and am notified that it has been changed to a one-aisle plane, can I get a refund without penalty?
 
Jun 26, 2018
4
1
3
81
#3
Neil, thanks for the reply. I suspected that was the case and that is why I have for the most part stopped flying. It is partly due to the seats having been moved closer together in the steerage section and the inability to recline the seat, especially on the one-aisle planes. I began getting claustrophobic in such confinement and that prompted a need to get up and out of my seat even more. It would not have been a problem on a 1-2 hour flight, but you're in your seat for 5-6 hours traveling from Hawaii to the west coast it can get to you.
 
Likes: Neil Maley

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
7,005
6,868
113
San Francisco
#4
Neil, thanks for the reply. I suspected that was the case and that is why I have for the most part stopped flying. It is partly due to the seats having been moved closer together in the steerage section and the inability to recline the seat, especially on the one-aisle planes. I began getting claustrophobic in such confinement and that prompted a need to get up and out of my seat even more. It would not have been a problem on a 1-2 hour flight, but you're in your seat for 5-6 hours traveling from Hawaii to the west coast it can get to you.
Well, essentially you're right, metgat, but I walk on a plane every 20 minutes no matter what the flight duration is; there's no medical reason, it's just never made sense to me to sit in an airplane seat too long. While strolling down an one-aisle aircraft is not particularly comfortable, I do it anyway ... what do I care about twisting sideways and turning around at the back of the plane if there's a line for the lav? A human body needs to move, and it's important to move whether the surroundings are perfect or not. It's a shame to give up travelling for a little roadblock like this.
 
Jun 26, 2018
4
1
3
81
#6
There is no sea travel from Hawaii to the West Coast unless it is part of a tour package. A refundable ticket costs about as much as business class. I'm staying home. thanks.
 
Jun 26, 2018
4
1
3
81
#8
Neil, yes there are cruises. I should have used that word rather than tour. However, it is my understanding that you can't simply buy a round-trip boat passage from Honolulu to San Francisco or LA without all the extras that go with a "cruise." I tried to do make such a booking several years ago, but was told there was no such thing. The only way I could do it was to buy into some cruise/tour package. Moreover, they all begin on the west coast and end on the west coast. There are no cruises that start in Hawaii and end in Hawaii. If you have different information I would appreciate knowing whom to contact.
 
May 26, 2018
15
9
3
68
#9
Actually there is but you might not hear much about it. Most cargo vessels have a few cabins they will sell to those who wish or need to travel by sea. When I was in Japan, my boss and his wife took a seagoing vessel all the way from Tokyo to the West coast!
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
13,843
13,274
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#10
Neil, yes there are cruises. I should have used that word rather than tour. However, it is my understanding that you can't simply buy a round-trip boat passage from Honolulu to San Francisco or LA without all the extras that go with a "cruise." I tried to do make such a booking several years ago, but was told there was no such thing. The only way I could do it was to buy into some cruise/tour package. Moreover, they all begin on the west coast and end on the west coast. There are no cruises that start in Hawaii and end in Hawaii. If you have different information I would appreciate knowing whom to contact.
Yes there are cruises that start and end in Hawaii NCL does them.

I’m not sure what you mean but buying “extras”. You buy a cabin in a ship. You get your cabin, all meals and free entertainment. You have to pay gratuities but otherwise if you drink no soda or liquor, eat in the main dining rooms and don’t buy any excursions-there are no extras.

You might want to find a good travel agent. They can certainly help you.

You can also buy business or first class seats if you want to fly and have a better choice of seats.
 
Likes: jsn55
May 26, 2018
15
9
3
68
#11
Yes there are cruises that start and end in Hawaii NCL does them.

I’m not sure what you mean but buying “extras”. You buy a cabin in a ship. You get your cabin, all meals and free entertainment. You have to pay gratuities but otherwise if you drink no soda or liquor, eat in the main dining rooms and don’t buy any excursions-there are no extras.

You might want to find a good travel agent. They can certainly help you.

You can also buy business or first class seats if you want to fly and have a better choice of seats.
Yes there are cruises that start and end in Hawaii NCL does them.

I’m not sure what you mean but buying “extras”. You buy a cabin in a ship. You get your cabin, all meals and free entertainment. You have to pay gratuities but otherwise if you drink no soda or liquor, eat in the main dining rooms and don’t buy any excursions-there are no extras.

You might want to find a good travel agent. They can certainly help you.

You can also buy business or first class seats if you want to fly and have a better choice of seats.
Actually there is but you might not hear much about it. Most cargo vessels have a few cabins they will sell to those who wish or need to travel by sea. When I was in Japan, my boss and his wife took a seagoing vessel all the way from Tokyo to the West coast!
Here’s the link about getting a cabin on a cargo ship: http://www.freightervoyages.eu/Cabins.htm
 
Likes: jsn55

Carrie Livingston

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Jan 6, 2015
895
877
93
45
St Louis
#12
Neil, NCL does a round trip Hawaii, not exactly what op is looking for. They are looking for Hawaii to West Coast and it can't happen on a ship b/c of PVSA, I think.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
13,843
13,274
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#13
Neil, NCL does a round trip Hawaii, not exactly what op is looking for. They are looking for Hawaii to West Coast and it can't happen on a ship b/c of PVSA, I think.
Most stop in Mexico or Vancouver to make the foreign port but it can be done. Of course then you need another to get back. Not sure what the writer means by “extras”.
 
Aug 29, 2015
462
703
93
49
#14
There are also cruise ships that do seasonal transitions to the west coast, usually Alaska, that stop in Hawaii and end in Canada (generally Vancouver) in the spring, then return to Hawaii in the fall. I know that Celebrity Cruises and Royal Caribbean both do it, Not sure about others.
 
Likes: jsn55
Feb 21, 2018
64
117
33
56
#15
To get a ship that either starts on the West Coast of North America and ends in Hawaii, one would have to be embarking the ship in Vancouver or Ensenada.

There was at one time an NCL ship that did one-way cruises from Hawaii to either LA or San Diego legally by including a stop in the Fanning Islands, considered a 'distant foreign port' so the cruise would meet the PSVA. They abandoned that itinerary a few years ago because it became increasingly difficult to actually make that call to Fanning.

One line use to do one-way trips to Hawaii from San Diego, but no passengers embarked in San Diego. The ship would be in port, passengers arrive at San Diego to check their bags which were loaded on the ship. Then, the ship would leave empty and sail to Ensenada while the passengers boarded buses to cross the border to the port where they would then be able to legally embark on a 'one way' cruise to Hawaii. The process would be reversed for those embarking the next cruise in Hawaii.

Sailing from Hawaii to the West Coast would not be legal under the PSVA if it only made a stop in Ensenada or Vancouver. Those are not 'distant foreign ports'.
 
Likes: jsn55
Aug 29, 2015
462
703
93
49
#16
Exactly, @msmayor . I’m thinking of ships that spend the North America winter in Australia/New Zealand, and the summer in Alaska. The do a full transpacific cruise, one leg of which is Hawaii to Vancouver, n the spring, and Vancouver to Hawaii in September.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
7,005
6,868
113
San Francisco
#17
What a fascinating thread this is! Metgat, you should establish a relationship with a travel agent who specializes in cruises ... looks like there are all kinds of opportunities, but they have to be extracted from all the usual cruises, and s/he could do that.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
13,843
13,274
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#18
To get a ship that either starts on the West Coast of North America and ends in Hawaii, one would have to be embarking the ship in Vancouver or Ensenada.

There was at one time an NCL ship that did one-way cruises from Hawaii to either LA or San Diego legally by including a stop in the Fanning Islands, considered a 'distant foreign port' so the cruise would meet the PSVA. They abandoned that itinerary a few years ago because it became increasingly difficult to actually make that call to Fanning.

One line use to do one-way trips to Hawaii from San Diego, but no passengers embarked in San Diego. The ship would be in port, passengers arrive at San Diego to check their bags which were loaded on the ship. Then, the ship would leave empty and sail to Ensenada while the passengers boarded buses to cross the border to the port where they would then be able to legally embark on a 'one way' cruise to Hawaii. The process would be reversed for those embarking the next cruise in Hawaii.

Sailing from Hawaii to the West Coast would not be legal under the PSVA if it only made a stop in Ensenada or Vancouver. Those are not 'distant foreign ports'.
There are cruises that go from LA and stop
in Ensenada to make the foreign port.