Money stolen while staying at Adagio Paris Centre Eiffel Tour

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Jul 30, 2018
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#21
I think it's important to point out that in the US hotels aren't subject to any responsibility for the lost or stolen items of their guests. That's why I strongly suggest investigating whatever French consumer laws apply in this matter.
 
Oct 30, 2019
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#22
After sending copies of the 2 Travel Advisor reviews of other thefts at this hotel to the CEO [email protected] and writing my own negative review I received the following e-mail from the not insurance company:
Magali Marquet <[email protected]>
4:23 AM (5 hours ago)
to me
REF PV2019300479
ADAGIO PARIS TOUR EIFFEL
AFFAIRE : O’LEARY


Dear Mrs. O’Leary,

Acting as ADAGIO Insurance Brokers, a copy of your letter to Adagio Paris Tour Eiffel has been forwarded to us.

We understand that money has disappeared during your stay in our client’s premises. Be sure we sincerely regret that unfortunate event.

We would like to inform you our client company is not to be considered as a hotel. According to French law, it is a “Résidence de Tourisme”.

Therefore, ADAGIO is managed under the French “arrêté du 14 février 1986”. As “Résidence de Tourisme” and according to French law and regulations, ADAGIO is not presumably liable for his clients’ belongings kept in apartments or parking-lots.

As a consequence, we regret not to be able to intervene further in your indemnification request.

Yours sincerely,



Magali Marquet
Commercial Risk Solutions I Direction Indemnisation et Solutions
R.C – Distribution/ Santé / Voyage
Aon France
31-35 rue de la Fédération | 75015 Paris Cedex
Tél : 01 47 83 11 62 |
[email protected]

Aon est le partenaire principal de Manchester United

I also received the following e-mail and offer from the hotel manager:
dagio Paris Tour Eiffel, Directeur
6:59 AM (3 hours ago)

to me, Kim







Dear Mrs O'Leary,

I'm getting back to you as I just got the reply of the insurance which will not take your situation into account.

All our apartments are equipped with safety box.

As an exceptional gesture, we will apply a 10% refund as a compensation which corresponds to 361€.

Would you please find enclosed the form to sign and write at the bottom of the page this sentence " good for agreement and settlement" and send it back to me with your bank details in order to get reimbursed.

Remaining at your entire disposal,

Kind regards,

Elie El Hayek
Directeur - General Manager

Tel: +33 (0) 1.45.71.85.30
Fax: +33 (0) 1.53.95.06.09
Cell: +33 (0) 6.79.94.98.46
e-mail:[email protected]
 

Attachments

Feb 3, 2017
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#24
I too would accept the offer; I doubt the offer will improve.

I don't see how it is 2/3 of your loss - more like about 50% of it. If you did have hard evidence, pursuing more would likely make sense.

Good luck whichever decision you make.
 
Likes: Mel65
Jan 6, 2015
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#25
I too would accept the offer; I doubt the offer will improve.

I don't see how it is 2/3 of your loss - more like about 50% of it. If you did have hard evidence, pursuing more would likely make sense.

Good luck whichever decision you make.
The total loss was $300 + 300 euros, which is $632. The offer is for 361 euros which is $400, which is 63% (approx 2/3) of the loss.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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#26
If you were staying at a hotel near your home and this occurred, in most jurisdictions the hotel would have no liability without some proof that the hotel or an employee had stolen from you. Here, you have no practical way of holding the hotel accountable, if that is even legally possible under French law.

I think that the manager's response to you when you went and got the police report was designed to put the dispute over until you had gone back to the States. We've all been victim to the business which suggests we call or write some central office; only to be told once we have done so that the central office will do nothing.

While nothing prevents a hotel from having insurance coverage that covers the personal property of its guests, I have never heard of a hotel that did so. Old-fashioned hotels had safety deposit boxes (good for the days folks may travel with thousands of dollars of cash); newer hotels had in-room safes.

I think the offer is extraordinary.

You may wish to check your homeowners policy (or travel insurance, if you had it)_ to see whether the loss of cash is covered.
 
Jun 12, 2019
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#27
If you were staying at a hotel near your home and this occurred, in most jurisdictions the hotel would have no liability without some proof that the hotel or an employee had stolen from you. Here, you have no practical way of holding the hotel accountable, if that is even legally possible under French law.

I think that the manager's response to you when you went and got the police report was designed to put the dispute over until you had gone back to the States. We've all been victim to the business which suggests we call or write some central office; only to be told once we have done so that the central office will do nothing.

While nothing prevents a hotel from having insurance coverage that covers the personal property of its guests, I have never heard of a hotel that did so. Old-fashioned hotels had safety deposit boxes (good for the days folks may travel with thousands of dollars of cash); newer hotels had in-room safes.

I think the offer is extraordinary.

You may wish to check your homeowners policy (or travel insurance, if you had it)_ to see whether the loss of cash is covered.
For that small amount, you are better off not claiming under your homeowners. The limit is usually very small, like $200.00 and may be subject to your deductible. If you are going to inquire about the coverage, ask your local agent and make sure they don't talk to underwriting. I have read stories about simply asking about a claim can cause some headaches.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#28
This is an awful story, I'm glad they've offered something.

Everyone should know the "rules" about hotel rooms.
You do not leave anything valuable in a hotel room, not even in a room safe, under any circumstances. When your hotel room is broken into, the hotel is seldom on the hook. There are hundreds of ways a thief can access a hotel room, and none of them are very difficult. It's easy to carry cash and jewelry with you at all times, as well as your passport. To leave electronics in a room is a bad idea, and they should be carried around with you as well. Use a backpack, a travel vest or anything you want, but don't leave valuables in a hotel room. Best thing, of course, is to leave all that stuff at home. My colleagues perhaps have had experience with the big safes at the front desk, but I don't bring anything valuable with me when I travel.
 
Likes: VoR61
Jun 24, 2019
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#29
We do not travel with jewelry.

We will lock electronics in the room safe rather than carry in our backpacks. We have not had a backpack stolen, but we have had folks start to unzip the pockets, so my wife now locks hers, although to me that's an advertisement. In in Milan on the subway I met two muggers, one of whom had her hand in my back pocket, where all I had was my return subway fare. I do not know if I dissuaded them from a life of crime (I doubt it) but I did protect that subway fare.

One can get cash at ATMs all over the world, and in most foreign countries, credit card usage is higher than here, and the terminal is brought to you, so the card never leaves your sight.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
8,949
9,564
113
San Francisco
#30
We do not travel with jewelry.

We will lock electronics in the room safe rather than carry in our backpacks. We have not had a backpack stolen, but we have had folks start to unzip the pockets, so my wife now locks hers, although to me that's an advertisement. In in Milan on the subway I met two muggers, one of whom had her hand in my back pocket, where all I had was my return subway fare. I do not know if I dissuaded them from a life of crime (I doubt it) but I did protect that subway fare.

One can get cash at ATMs all over the world, and in most foreign countries, credit card usage is higher than here, and the terminal is brought to you, so the card never leaves your sight.
I'm on a business travel forum, and we hear mostly about "high-end" hotels. I've learned that a room safe is nearly useless, as there are master keys readily available ... the engineers, the front desk, and who knows whom have master keys for the room safes. Guests regularly require help with the safes. I've heard of entire room safes being abducted ... and the entire cabinet containing the safe was once carted out of a hotel room.
 
Likes: VoR61
Feb 24, 2018
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#31
This is an awful story, I'm glad they've offered something.

Everyone should know the "rules" about hotel rooms. You do not leave anything valuable in a hotel room, not even in a room safe, under any circumstances. When your hotel room is broken into, the hotel is seldom on the hook. There are hundreds of ways a thief can access a hotel room, and none of them are very difficult. It's easy to carry cash and jewelry with you at all times, as well as your passport. To leave electronics in a room is a bad idea, and they should be carried around with you as well. Use a backpack, a travel vest or anything you want, but don't leave valuables in a hotel room. Best thing, of course, is to leave all that stuff at home. My colleagues perhaps have had experience with the big safes at the front desk, but I don't bring anything valuable with me when I travel.
Rest assured, though, if the OP had come here for advice because she had been robbed while carrying her electronics, jewelry, and cash around Paris, these two pages would have been filled with the following: "Why didn't you leave it in your hotel room? Hotels have safes (or key card access) for a reason. At least if something was stolen from your room, you would know it was someone with key card access, and could hold the hotel accountable because of that."

So it's not that I don't think your advice is valid, JSN, but that whatever the circumstances, perhaps someone else's travel habits could have prevented it, but perhaps they could have caused the same loss. Personally, I can think of many more ways your belongings are at risk being carried round Paris with you than being secured in most hotel rooms. I would personally suggest that it much more of a rule that you don't walk around large cities carrying your valuables.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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www.promalvacations.com
#32
If you think before you pack and don’t have anything you can’t afford to lose- you won’t have to worry about it.

Using the room safe at least offers some type of protection versus leaving things in a cupboard. There are no guarantees with the safe but at least it’s a deterrent. We also travel with luggage locks on our suitcases and if there is no safe in the room we lock valuables in that and hope no one is smart enough to stick a pencil in the zipper to break it open.
 
Likes: jsn55

mmb

Verified Member
Jan 20, 2015
1,180
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#33
If you think before you pack and don’t have anything you can’t afford to lose- you won’t have to worry about it.

Using the room safe at least offers some type of protection versus leaving things in a cupboard. There are no guarantees with the safe but at least it’s a deterrent. We also travel with luggage locks on our suitcases and if there is no safe in the room we lock valuables in that and hope no one is smart enough to stick a pencil in the zipper to break it open.
why do you keep advising people to stick a pencil in the suitcase zipper to open it?
 
Likes: ADM
Feb 3, 2017
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#34
I never leave anything in a room safe (bad experience once which was enough for me); I put my tablet, cash, extra credit/debit cards in my suitcase and lock it - so far, so good. Of course, someone could cut into it or waltz off with it but it's a bit more risky to be seen walking off with a suitcase than being able to tuck a tablet, cash, etc into a pocket. And, there is, of course, the usual room card reader but a lot of smaller places don't use them.

My passport is always with me. There is no perfect way but I do think leaving anything not locked up in some way is at greater risk than not - and it is so easy to lock things up.

I talked to someone once who said he takes a small nanny cam wherever he travels and leaves it innocuously in the room - just in case.... Seems a tad extreme but whatever works to make someone at ease, I guess.

As to the zipper and pencil thing - there are suitcases that do not have zippers - again, if someone wants to go all out in the unlikely event a theft will occur. I saw a Samsonite one and I'm sure there are others.
 
Likes: VoR61