MLB and Ticketmaster: refund needed

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Jul 18, 2019
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#1
My boyfriend and I took advantage of a presale opportunity I was given (from a friend and BOS season ticket holder) to purchase MLB tickets for the NYY-BOS game held in London last month (June 2019). We purchased the tickets in Nov 2018 and got (3) tickets for both games.

It became apparent within a few weeks that the 3rd person may have issues going due to work. I began talking with the red sox and ticketmaster-UK earlier this year on how we may handle the situation. The red sox claimed NO responsibility whatsoever. Ticketmaster told me first that it was a weekend ticket and that I couldnt split up the games (each tix was for 2 games). Then they told me I couldn't resell them. They also couldn't tell me when I would actually get the tickets, or the seat assignments, so that I could even try to sell them on a site like StubHub. Now mind you I wasn't looking to make money, I just wanted to recoup the cost.

Sure enough the 3rd person bailed. I received the tickets 2 weeks before the game, and interestingly enough, there were 6 of them (contrary to being told that I'd only receive 3 tickets). Ticketmaster-UK would not allow me to post the tickets on their ticket exchange. I was told it was up to me how to dispose of the tickets, and "gifting" was certainly an option, but reselling them was not. I was already in contact with several friends from NY and Boston who had purchased tix on StubHub and were going to the game so not sure why we were singled out as unable to resell ours. I will also add that we were sold an insurance policy, that of course when it came time to try to use, we were told only applied to people WHO LIVED IN THE UK.

We were left to sell the tickets at the stadium, which was a joke due to the huge amount of tickets being pedaled there. It seems that our buying tix back in the fall punished us because as time went by and the configuration of the game/stadium was finalized, seat configurations changed, prices went down, more tickets were released, and there was no market for our tickets anymore. Had we been able to post them back when we wanted to we *may* have been able to sell them, but the weekend of the game, there were just too many tickets available.

All I want is to recoup the money for the 2 game ticket that we couldn't use or resell. we spend $2200 for the six tickets, so to eat $750 is unacceptable, especially when I had ample reason to believe I was going to need to sell one.

Looking for advice or help on the best way to approach this. I am an avid Red Sox fan, so I'd like to appeal to the Red sox, MLB directly, Ticketmaster, and Ticketmaster-UK. I am considering disputing the charge with my credit card, but I have the Capital One Venture card and my success rate at appealing charges with them is about 0% so not very optimistic.

Thank you in advance for any guidance!
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
18,799
17,000
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#2
Tickets on Ticketmaster are always final sale and no refunds are ever given unless an event is canceled.

I don’t know why they told you you couldn’t resell them but you should have put them in stubhub. However even with that there is no guarantee you would have sold them at face value either.

Do not do a chargeback. The tickets were nonrefundable and you most likely won’t win the dispute. What you would be doing is called friendly fraud. Ticketmaster sold you the seats and you received what you paid for - there is no reason to do a chargeback because someone backed out.

Take it as a lesson learned about buying tickets for anyone other than yourself. The friend that asked you to buy the ticket owes you the money.
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
1,950
2,031
113
Maui Hawaii
#4
My boyfriend and I took advantage of a presale opportunity I was given (from a friend and BOS season ticket holder) to purchase MLB tickets for the NYY-BOS game held in London last month (June 2019). We purchased the tickets in Nov 2018 and got (3) tickets for both games.

It became apparent within a few weeks that the 3rd person may have issues going due to work. I began talking with the red sox and ticketmaster-UK earlier this year on how we may handle the situation. The red sox claimed NO responsibility whatsoever. Ticketmaster told me first that it was a weekend ticket and that I couldnt split up the games (each tix was for 2 games). Then they told me I couldn't resell them. They also couldn't tell me when I would actually get the tickets, or the seat assignments, so that I could even try to sell them on a site like StubHub. Now mind you I wasn't looking to make money, I just wanted to recoup the cost.

Sure enough the 3rd person bailed. I received the tickets 2 weeks before the game, and interestingly enough, there were 6 of them (contrary to being told that I'd only receive 3 tickets). Ticketmaster-UK would not allow me to post the tickets on their ticket exchange. I was told it was up to me how to dispose of the tickets, and "gifting" was certainly an option, but reselling them was not. I was already in contact with several friends from NY and Boston who had purchased tix on StubHub and were going to the game so not sure why we were singled out as unable to resell ours. I will also add that we were sold an insurance policy, that of course when it came time to try to use, we were told only applied to people WHO LIVED IN THE UK.

We were left to sell the tickets at the stadium, which was a joke due to the huge amount of tickets being pedaled there. It seems that our buying tix back in the fall punished us because as time went by and the configuration of the game/stadium was finalized, seat configurations changed, prices went down, more tickets were released, and there was no market for our tickets anymore. Had we been able to post them back when we wanted to we *may* have been able to sell them, but the weekend of the game, there were just too many tickets available.

All I want is to recoup the money for the 2 game ticket that we couldn't use or resell. we spend $2200 for the six tickets, so to eat $750 is unacceptable, especially when I had ample reason to believe I was going to need to sell one.

Looking for advice or help on the best way to approach this. I am an avid Red Sox fan, so I'd like to appeal to the Red sox, MLB directly, Ticketmaster, and Ticketmaster-UK. I am considering disputing the charge with my credit card, but I have the Capital One Venture card and my success rate at appealing charges with them is about 0% so not very optimistic.

Thank you in advance for any guidance!
You have NO BASIS for a charge card dispute. To do so would be fraudulent. The CC would rightly refuse your chargeback. You purchased tickets that were non-refundable. The fact that your "friend" bailed and stuck you with the tickets is the problem. It is not the Red Sox or Ticketmaster's or Capital One's problem. Your friend owes you the money, not anybody else. In the future let your "friends" buy their own tickets.
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
1,950
2,031
113
Maui Hawaii
#5
Tickets on Ticketmaster are always final sale and no refunds are ever given unless an event is canceled.

I don’t know why they told you you couldn’t resell them but you should have put them in stubhub. However even with that there is no guarantee you would have sold them at face value either.

Do not do a chargeback. The tickets were nonrefundable and you most likely won’t win the dispute. What you would be doing is called friendly fraud. Ticketmaster sold you the seats and you received what you paid for - there is no reason to do a chargeback because someone backed out.

Take it as a lesson learned about buying tickets for anyone other than yourself. The friend that asked you to buy the ticket owes you the money.
Neil, this is just plain fraud, not friendly fraud. Buyer remorse because a "friend" "bailed" does not make a CC chargeback anything but fraud.
 
Sep 27, 2017
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#7
Just wondering are there any 'scalping' rules in the UK? TM in the states has their own 'verified fan' resale option where you can put your tickets on sale with a click. Does TM in the UK have that option, or could it be blocked due to local laws?
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
8,397
8,503
113
San Francisco
#8
My colleagues are correct. If you chose to purchase a tix for a friend and they don't reimburse you, none of the entities involved are responsible. Your friend needs to pay you for the tix, it's that simple. I think we all learn this life-lesson at some point or the other, and now you have too.
 
Jul 18, 2019
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#9
Wow, you people are horrible accusing me of fraud. and implying it is a life-lesson. At the end of the day, I should have been given the information about my seats so I could have explored options around what to do. Not giving me seats until 2 weeks prior to the event makes it extremely difficult to post something on STubHub to sell when the first question would be "where are the seats". Had these actions happened in a timely manner, I may have gotten something for the tickets, but maybe not.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
18,799
17,000
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#10
What were the terms of the tickets at the time you bought them? Were they to be delivered two weeks before the event as stated in your confirmation?

Did you buy Ticketmaster’s purchase protection? That might have covered the cancellation. That pops up before you can even put in a credit card number - you have to say yes or no to the protection before you can put in a credit card.

Your friend that wanted you to buy the tickets owes you the money for backing out, regardless of how you look at this. You should have told the friend they were responsible for paying you for the ticket and they could have sold it to get their money back.

Doing a false chargeback is a fraudulent dispute and you won’t win it. As I said, it’s called “friendly fraud” and it’s a real thing. Even if you had won a dispute, your credit card company can sue you.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chargeback_fraud
74FAD261-81DE-47B3-AF42-9173B40C2059.jpeg
 
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Jan 11, 2019
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#11
No one is accusing you of fraud, they're just giving you a heads up that if you try and do a chargeback that it could go badly for you. Think of it this way, if you sold a ticket to an event and the person who bought the ticket from you wasn't able to go, would you give them their money back? What if they used a credit card to buy the ticket you were selling and did a chargeback and you were not only out the ticket but the money. A chargeback is to protect consumers from fraud if someone stoled your card or if a service isn't delivered. You received a ticket and it wasn't used. I'd have asked the friend for the money up front so I wouldn't be stuck with an unused ticket. Sorry this happened to you.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
18,799
17,000
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#12
Our OP has said :

“I am considering disputing the charge with my credit card, but I have the Capital One Venture card and my success rate at appealing charges with them is about 0% so not very optimistic.”

This shows if you are using the dispute process incorrectly, the credit card won’t take the case. I do think she is correct- the success rate will stay at zero because Ticketmaster did nothing wrong. They delivered the nonrefundable tickets she purchased. On the ticket orders, Ticketmaster also states when the tickets will be delivered.

These are the terms on tickets I bought last year for an upcoming concert. Her tickets should show what the terms were when she bought.

D1A30EA7-73C8-4DA5-8C20-10C77CAFCCAE.jpeg
 
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Likes: Patina
Mar 23, 2015
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#14
At the end of the day, I should have been given the information about my seats so I could have explored options around what to do. Not giving me seats until 2 weeks prior to the event makes it extremely difficult to post something on STubHub to sell when the first question would be "where are the seats". Had these actions happened in a timely manner, I may have gotten something for the tickets, but maybe not.
I want to be sure I understand: You purchased tickets to an event for $750 each, WITHOUT KNOWING what seats you were purchasing?? That is risky! But, it isn't TM fault that your friend couldn't go. You really should reach out to your friend and ask for the difference between what (if anything) you were able to sell the ticket for, and what you paid, so that you are made whole. You took an expensive action based on your friend's assurance that he/she was going. All the other stuff with TM etc... is clutter--HE (or she) is the one who screwed you over.
 
Feb 21, 2018
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#16
This is one of those unusual events where many ticket buyers simply want to be there, and don't care where they sit. I know from experience that this is not all that unusual.

We entered a 'ticket lottery' years ago to get Regional Final seats for the NCAA basketball tournament. One year ahead, we forked over a credit card number and request for four seats, not knowing at all where we'd be sitting. Our card was charged, and we waited for months to see if we'd even win the lottery (if we hadn't, they'd refund our credit card). We ended up winning in the lottery - four seats one row from the tippy top of the stadium - but didn't know where our seats were until the tickets arrived in the mail.

This information, though, is normally disclosed at the time you purchase the tickets. If you bought the tickets knowing that the seat locations would not be revealed to you until two weeks prior, then it is not reasonable to expect to get them any sooner. You say that you 'should have been given the location of your seats, but what exactly were the terms that were set when your card was charged? That is what governs when you would learn where your seats were.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
18,799
17,000
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#17
This is one of those unusual events where many ticket buyers simply want to be there, and don't care where they sit. I know from experience that this is not all that unusual.

We entered a 'ticket lottery' years ago to get Regional Final seats for the NCAA basketball tournament. One year ahead, we forked over a credit card number and request for four seats, not knowing at all where we'd be sitting. Our card was charged, and we waited for months to see if we'd even win the lottery (if we hadn't, they'd refund our credit card). We ended up winning in the lottery - four seats one row from the tippy top of the stadium - but didn't know where our seats were until the tickets arrived in the mail.

This information, though, is normally disclosed at the time you purchase the tickets. If you bought the tickets knowing that the seat locations would not be revealed to you until two weeks prior, then it is not reasonable to expect to get them any sooner. You say that you 'should have been given the location of your seats, but what exactly were the terms that were set when your card was charged? That is what governs when you would learn where your seats were.
Exactly my question. I pulled some tickets we had through Ticketmaster and the terms of the tickets delivery are right listed at the time you purchase and also on the ticket receipt.
 
Feb 3, 2019
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#18
I will also add that we were sold an insurance policy, that of course when it came time to try to use, we were told only applied to people WHO LIVED IN THE UK.
Was this the Ticketmaster policy, like Neil highlighted above? If so, did you ever get any details of the coverage you purchased?

Seems pretty ridiculous for TM to sell a policy only available to UK residents if the purchaser is using a U.S.-based internet connection and a U.S. credit card.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
18,799
17,000
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#19
Remember this was a pre-sale offering and TM may not have had all the information for the venue at the time they put the tickets up for sale. I once bought tickets years ago that stipulated tickets would not be issued until a few weeks before the event.

If they used the TM UK website vs the US website, it doesn’t make them any less immune to the rules for the ticket sales.

The OP didn’t answer any of our questions about what they ticket terms were when she last posted - only that she should have received the seat info earlier so she could resell the tickets. If the sale did not include the terms- that she wouldn’t get the seat info until 2 weeks before- she might have a case to go back to TM.

If the terms were stated and she bought knowing the terms- different story.

Without knowing if the terms were disclosed, we really can’t do anything.
 
Feb 11, 2018
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#20