Marriott Scent Branding is making us sick!

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Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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www.promalvacations.com
#21
I just spent the weekend in Palm Beach with some wealthy friends who have a new house. She is originally from South Carolina and this new house had such a strong fragrance ... in every room. The fragrance was completely unnatural. I wonder if, in some circles, it's considered positive to over-scent your environment because of the heat and humidity and perhaps resulting "moldy" smells? I agree that pleasant organic fragrances are always a positive; the chemical smell of "room fresheners" is awful when too strong.
We are snowbirding in Florida and there is a room in the house that has a mildew smell and my wife has more “scents” in the house trying to cover the odor. She is the only one who smells the smell and has enough Damp Rid and air fresheners she could supply a hotel.
 
Feb 11, 2018
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#23
Hotels do a lot of research and consumer surveys before implementing changes like this. I’m
site they found that there is something mentally going on that leaves a positive impression on people when they walk into a place that smells nice.

You can be sure there is something behind thirst changes they would be able to point to.

There are a lot of organic ways of scenting an area that don’t have to use chemicals
Whenever I walk into a place with an obvious scent I always wonder what they're trying to cover up.
 
Likes: Neil Maley

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
8,073
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#25
FlyingThroughLife, I have read that ground coffee can remove odors. In the event you are overwhelmed in you hotel room you may find that useful to test. Also, the time-honored baking soda solution works, but ground coffee is common in rooms and more readily available in general for guests.
So true! I've used a bag of ground coffee many times, learned it from Continental Air, there was always one in the lav. Personally, I'm not bothered by the scenting that has been going on over the last few years, but I've often wondered about people who were sensitive to it. And now I know, it must be awful.
 
Likes: VoR61
Apr 18, 2019
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#26
Marriott recently engaged in the practice of scent branding in their full service hotels. They believe that customers will remember the lovely chemical, perfume they are spraying into the lobby areas, and return because of it. All of us who are Marriott loyalists know that it's all about the comfort, points, and hotel availability. Not a sickening smell in the lobby.

My problem with the scent branding isn't the smell. The chemicals they use are a health hazard to all, but especially to people like me who are sensitive to multiple chemicals. The second I walk into a full service Marriott lobby, my tongue begins to tingle then gets numb. Seconds later my throat starts to close. I've tried holding my breath while leaving the hotel while running for the exit, but the last hotel I checked out of (Miami Airport Marriott) had the smell in the elevator.

I'm a corporate flight attendant, and I feel that I'm in danger of losing my job because of Marriott's scent branding. My flight department prefers to book Marriott Hotels for their crews because we all have high status there and enhanced benefits such as late check out etc. When I explained to my boss about my allergy, his immediate comments made me feel as if I was being a problem, and might not be able to continue working there. Marriott's unnecessary perfuming of the lobby air has the potential to ruin my career.

Multiple chemical sensitivity is becoming more common. I've seen many other complaints about the practice of scent branding and perfumes in general. The more we are exposed to dangerous chemicals, the more sensitive we become. In this age of information, I'm appalled that Marriott didn't do their homework before deciding to spray toxic chemicals in the air, all in the name of marketing. They've taken a wonderful brand and ruined it for me, many other guests and many of their employees as well.

I've talked with a United Airlines flight attendant about this issue, and she has confirmed that she, and many of her fellow flight attendants are being negatively affected by the scents in Marriott Hotels. The fight against these fragrances has only begun on a small scale, but if airline unions get involved, maybe Marriott will listen. Losing those contracts would hurt the bottom line.

I have emailed Marriott, and talked on the phone with a very understanding representative from Marriott, but so far I don't believe they care, because nothing is being changed. The man I talked with said that this was the FIRST complaint he's heard about the scent branding. If you google "Marriott scent branding", you can see that I'm not the only one complaining. The complaints just are't reaching the right people yet. Let's get it out there!

The link below is for Marriott's environmental responsibility propaganda. It all rings false to me after being made sick by the chemicals they intentionally make us breath.

http://serve360.marriott.com/sustain/
I have this problem at Residence Inn and at Springhill Suites. I thought I could stick it out when we entered our room two nights ago in Louisville with that old familiar smell but the fragrance is so sickening in the rooms that I awoke at 1:30 AM nauseated, with a headache, and severe dizziness. This also happened last summer in Asheville, NC. This time, I had to leave the room and go outside so my husband could pack our things. When we returned home, I had to wash everything including pillows that we had taken into the room because the "sickening" scent stuck to everything. I spoke to the front desk person - who was very nice - but was clueless that someone could have such a problem with fragrance. I didn't ask for refund nor was any offered. I sent an email to Marriott customer service but I don't really expect any change. This is very disappointing because the number of people with chemical and fragrance allergies is increasing daily. In fact, one of the conferences I attend forbids any kind of fragrance for attendees because the complaint is so wide-spread. I love Marriott, but I cannot stay any more.
 
Mar 23, 2015
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#27
Whenever I walk into a place with an obvious scent I always wonder what they're trying to cover up.
I always put lightly crushed coffee beans in the bottom of my trash bags when I change them out to minimize trash odors of food and funk and they seem to help and I do use scented wax melts that I plug into outlets in our house. What I'm usually trying to hide is the fact that we have two English bulldogs so our house often smells of "Eau de Dog But."
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
17,562
15,870
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#28
I always put lightly crushed coffee beans in the bottom of my trash bags when I change them out to minimize trash odors of food and funk and they seem to help and I do use scented wax melts that I plug into outlets in our house. What I'm usually trying to hide is the fact that we have two English bulldogs so our house often smells of "Eau de Dog But."
I am laughing at your "eau de dog but". My wife went to a new clients' house last week that had a bulldog and she said the house stunk of dog. She was gagging when she got home.