Lenovo refuses to honor international warranty for defective yoga730

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jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
7,317
7,139
113
San Francisco
#21
This is an incredibly awful situation. I can't imagine what the solution is. Obviously, Lenovo should authorize a Spanish tech to fix the laptop or declare it a lemon ... but they don't much care if you're totally inconvenienced and helpless with a bum computer. Nobody at corporate wants to stick his neck out and do the right thing; they're hiding behind the mumbo-jumbo with the model/warranty. How are you supposed to know about this? Therefore, I would call my CC company and ask for guidance on a charge-back. This is usually the last result, but it may work for you. BB sold you a lemon Lenovo and there's nothing you can do about it in Spain. Seems to me this qualifies in some way, but Citi can advise you.
 
Likes: csenoner
Mar 14, 2018
185
214
43
#22
This is an incredibly awful situation. I can't imagine what the solution is. Obviously, Lenovo should authorize a Spanish tech to fix the laptop or declare it a lemon ... but they don't much care if you're totally inconvenienced and helpless with a bum computer. Nobody at corporate wants to stick his neck out and do the right thing; they're hiding behind the mumbo-jumbo with the model/warranty. How are you supposed to know about this? Therefore, I would call my CC company and ask for guidance on a charge-back. This is usually the last result, but it may work for you. BB sold you a lemon Lenovo and there's nothing you can do about it in Spain. Seems to me this qualifies in some way, but Citi can advise you.
OP bought a computer in the US and took it to Spain where it isn't sold or serviced. It's not a matter of authorization--It's likely the parts, tools and expertise to repair it are not available in Spain. There's no mumbo-jumbo involved --Lenovo lists the countries where warranty service is available on their web site.

I don't see how the credit card can help. Best Buy has honored their return period and Lenovo is honoring its warranty. They're just difficult for the OP to take advantage of because he left the service area.

All I would suggest is writing Lenovo to see if they are willing to help by either paying for the international shipping or swapping the US computer for an EU one. Understand that they would be going way beyond their obligations if they do this, so be sure to write your letter accordingly.

If your credit card offers extended warranty, you could also wait until you're back in the US to repair the computer. Maybe you could purchase a different computer to use in Spain. If you do this, remember that the US will charge customs duties if you bring it home, so you probably would want to sell it before leaving...
 
Nov 29, 2017
13
21
3
32
Amsterdam
#23
It's not the same model even though it has similar specs. Electronics sold in the EU are often built using different components to avoid EU tariffs. That's why they use a different model number.

If the problem is the motherboard as the OP suspects, the Lenovo repair facility will only be able to swap it for the European version. This might work, but Lenovo has never tested the long term reliability of systems built from a mix of EU and US components. The EU motherboard may also require different software (device drivers). That's why they don't warranty the product in Europe.
As @smd says it may even have the same specs and still be a different machine. Europe has a slightly different keyboard than the U.S. (apperently we have an extra symbol somewhere), but the EU also has regulations regarding the power consumption of the processors - I was told it has to do with environmental regulations (it mostly means that the newer machines can be slower than older machines with that same processor).

I took a moment to compare the specifications of the Yoga 730 on Best Buy with two local websites and while the majority of the specs match the EU versions appear to have a different graphics card. The product number is indeed different - at Best Buy it ends in US and for my country in EHM.

I understand that this doesn't really help OP of course, it only explains why Lenovo may be being difficult. Outside of the credit card insurance - there doesn't happen to be a collegae or family/friend travelling to the US anytime soon that could take it there? If none of that helps I would try to persue @weihlac 's suggestion which maybe a workable route.
 

AMA

Verified Member
Dec 11, 2014
969
1,213
93
#24
It isn't hugely complex to replace a motherboard. If he could order the right model # of the part from the US, I bet he could find a local independent computer store to replace it. He'd have to pay, of course, but it wouldn't be as expensive as buying a new computer.
 
Jun 30, 2017
849
785
93
Maui Hawaii
#25
It isn't hugely complex to replace a motherboard. If he could order the right model # of the part from the US, I bet he could find a local independent computer store to replace it. He'd have to pay, of course, but it wouldn't be as expensive as buying a new computer.
Then he would have the same computer with poor reviews and a voided warranty.

"My computer has an international warranty (IWS), but Lenovo is saying the warranty only covers me in USA, Australia, New Zealand and Singapore. "

When you bought the international warranty from Best Buy were you told it was not truly an international warranty but good only in a limited group of countries? If you were not told at the time of purchase that the "international warranty" was not truly an international warranty, then you have a case for a chargeback since you were sold a product with a warranty that was not as advertised. If I bought a product in the US that I knew I was taking to Spain and therefore prudently purchased an international warranty, I, as a reasonable consumer, would assume that the international warranty covered me internationally. If the warranty does not do this then it was sold deceptively and should be eligible for a chargeback.
 
Last edited:

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
14,700
13,757
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#26
As a former computer guy that a computer can die if the converter you used is bad. Is Spain 220v? When you use a converter a slight surge in power can fry the machine. If that is what happened the warranty would likely not cover the repair anyway.

What type of a converter are you using? My wife had a converter that was bad and melted her curling iron.

There are so many variables to what could happen I don’t think you are going to be able to assume anything unless you have it looked at. But if it has anything to do with a slight power surge- the warranty might not cover it at all.

Can you post a link to the warranty here so we can review it for you?
 
Likes: AMA
Sep 19, 2015
3,173
4,346
113
48
#27
As a former computer guy that a computer can die if the converter you used is bad. Is Spain 220v? When you use a converter a slight surge in power can fry the machine. If that is what happened the warranty would likely not cover the repair anyway.

What type of a converter are you using? My wife had a converter that was bad and melted her curling iron.

There are so many variables to what could happen I don’t think you are going to be able to assume anything unless you have it looked at. But if it has anything to do with a slight power surge- the warranty might not cover it at all.

Can you post a link to the warranty here so we can review it for you?
Neil I posted a link to the warranty under post number 9 -/ it is a limited international warranty

Most likely if not all new computers can handle input voltage of 100 to 240v — Thankfully no converter needed.
 
Jul 27, 2016
1,054
1,251
113
#28
As a former computer guy that a computer can die if the converter you used is bad. Is Spain 220v? When you use a converter a slight surge in power can fry the machine. If that is what happened the warranty would likely not cover the repair anyway.

What type of a converter are you using? My wife had a converter that was bad and melted her curling iron.

There are so many variables to what could happen I don’t think you are going to be able to assume anything unless you have it looked at. But if it has anything to do with a slight power surge- the warranty might not cover it at all.

Can you post a link to the warranty here so we can review it for you?
I haven't had a laptop with a power supply that couldn't handle 220/240 since at least the mid-90s. Just need a plug adapter.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
7,317
7,139
113
San Francisco
#29
Neil I posted a link to the warranty under post number 9 -/ it is a limited international warranty

Most likely if not all new computers can handle input voltage of 100 to 240v — Thankfully no converter needed.
Yes, almost all computers sold today are automatic dual-voltage. Small appliances such as curling irons or sound machines don't do well with 220 to 110 converters, that is true. I always run my sound machine on batteries in Europe.
 
Sep 27, 2018
10
2
1
36
#30
Hi, I want to reply to this threat to thank everyone for their input and give an update.

I finally got the refund just last week thanks in part to the help I received on this forum. Sorry for not replying as I stopped receiving email notifications about this thread so I thought that there were no new posts. I just came back to update and saw these posts, so thank you all.

So one member (weihlac) posted a link to Lenovo corporate offices in North Carolina and so I called the numbers provided and left a message. I was eventually contacted by a woman named Debbie Mitchell. I explained everything very carefully and provided proof such as weblinks and screen shots as well as forwarding emails from other agents and I built my case. It was a very long-winded email but I felt I laid out the crux of my complaint very well. I did not receive a response and so I decided to call again.

Debbie was at first very dismissive as every other agent and case manager was. I was told the computer isn't covered and that is it and she essentially tried to get rid of me. She continually "moved the goalpost" in terms of her explanations of why my warranty was being denied and the story changed numerous times. At some point I took offense to the treatment I was receiving (not as much by her, but the cumulative beating over 6 weeks of emails and calls with probably a dozen agents) and I raised my vice and made it very clear that I was not going away and that I objected to the treatment I had been receiving as a paying customer who received a defective product. I went on a bit of a rant and made it very clear that she needed to stop cutting me off and listen to my complaint rather than dismissing it. She could sense my extreme frustration and eventually apologized and for the first time someone listened.

We went over the email and I realized she had never even read it and was not familiar with my complaint. I forwarded an email from Lenovo saying the laptop is covered and giving me Visonic as a service agent. I told her how can a consumer be expected to untangle the web of language if their own employees can't even tell if its covered or not. We went over the evidence and I proved to her that the info on the website made it clear my computer is covered in any country where the machine is sold and where the machine is serviced. I then showed her that the machine is sold in Spain through a weblink to FNAC (its like the best buy of Europe, an international company based out of France). At first she said they aren't authorized etc and tried to get around that, but I showed her the language that said nothing about authorized retailers. Then I showed her a screen shot from the Lenovo website showing that my computer model is serviced by Visonic in Madrid.

So now I showed that this met the requirements for coverage provided by their IWS policy as described on the website. She said the computer is definitely not covered but now understood why I would have thought it was and she said she would look into the matter and asked me for a call the following day.

I prepared for another battle after this 45 minute talk, but to my surprise I was told that in fact they had authorized a refund for the purchase! But there was one requirement (and you will not believe this), I was told I had to destroy the computer and was even given 2 potential means of destruction: I could "run it over with a car or smash it to pieces with a hammer" and then take photos of the destroyed computer and send it to her. They were not willing to replace it or fix it. But to process the refund I would need to prove it was demolished.

I explained that I was hesitant to do so without receiving a signed document confirming it. She told me it is authorized and told me I would have to trust her. So I went outside (against my better judgement) and smashed the band new laptop to pieces (I have to admit it was fun to take out this frustration even though I realized that this was not safe nor environmentally friendly, but it was my only option for a refund). As I smashed it, the battery it popped and started releasing a huge cloud of toxic smoke and I burnt my fingers pretty bad. I then had to wait for it to cool, and take a picture, then lug around the toxic garbage for the day as I was afraid to leave it in my house, yet I didn't want to throw it away until I received the refund.

I sent the pictures and explained that they should not recommend this in the future as it is dangerous and bad for the environment (and insane). She said that's what they are usually asked to tell customers to do , utterly bizarre. Imagine if I had not been smart enough to do this outside, it could have been very dangerous and they would have had a lawsuit on their hands. After 3 or 4 days my refund was received!

The general lesson learned is never buy Lenovo, as I am not the only one who deals with this treatment. Hundreds online have similar stories They seem to use this treatment as a cost cutting measure to test your will and save on repair costs. They obviously don't care about the price in damage to the Lenovo brand. I am amazed they can have success with this policy. Anyhow, the other lesson is persistence can pay off. I probably should have just quit weeks earlier as it may not have been worth the stress and countless hours wasted, but in the end it was a bit of justice and I feel vindicated and am happy to be able to buy another computer with the refunded money. The problem is my research still led me back to Lenovo as a good buy in the 2-in-1 form factor. Of course I did not buy it, I went with the HP Envy x360 and am currently waiting for it to arrive. Lets hope I don't have to deal with any problems with this one!

Thanks again for the help guys. Great community you have here standing up to corporations who take advantage of customers and helping consumers!

Edited by moderator to remove phone number.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Sep 27, 2018
10
2
1
36
#32
Is it possible to edit the post? I am not sure if its a good idea to post her name and number. Can the mods do that please? I would say despite the fact the was difficult at first, she was the only one who actually listened to my concern and when shown the truth , she agreed with me and even admitted it was Lenovo's error. She also was the one who then made sure I got the refund and was professional in follow up. So I am grateful for the help she provided. And it did seem that she was in fact told by superiors, and maybe regularly, to give those instructions, so I dont think she is at fault for the general policy of stonewalling and neglect.
 
Jun 30, 2017
849
785
93
Maui Hawaii
#33
Hi, I want to reply to this threat to thank everyone for their input and give an update.

I finally got the refund just last week thanks in part to the help I received on this forum. Sorry for not replying as I stopped receiving email notifications about this thread so I thought that there were no new posts. I just came back to update and saw these posts, so thank you all.

So one member (weihlac) posted a link to Lenovo corporate offices in North Carolina and so I called the numbers provided and left a message. I was eventually contacted by a woman named Debbie Mitchell. I explained everything very carefully and provided proof such as weblinks and screen shots as well as forwarding emails from other agents and I built my case. It was a very long-winded email but I felt I laid out the crux of my complaint very well. I did not receive a response and so I decided to call again.

Debbie was at first very dismissive as every other agent and case manager was. I was told the computer isn't covered and that is it and she essentially tried to get rid of me. She continually "moved the goalpost" in terms of her explanations of why my warranty was being denied and the story changed numerous times. At some point I took offense to the treatment I was receiving (not as much by her, but the cumulative beating over 6 weeks of emails and calls with probably a dozen agents) and I raised my vice and made it very clear that I was not going away and that I objected to the treatment I had been receiving as a paying customer who received a defective product. I went on a bit of a rant and made it very clear that she needed to stop cutting me off and listen to my complaint rather than dismissing it. She could sense my extreme frustration and eventually apologized and for the first time someone listened.

We went over the email and I realized she had never even read it and was not familiar with my complaint. I forwarded an email from Lenovo saying the laptop is covered and giving me Visonic as a service agent. I told her how can a consumer be expected to untangle the web of language if their own employees can't even tell if its covered or not. We went over the evidence and I proved to her that the info on the website made it clear my computer is covered in any country where the machine is sold and where the machine is serviced. I then showed her that the machine is sold in Spain through a weblink to FNAC (its like the best buy of Europe, an international company based out of France). At first she said they aren't authorized etc and tried to get around that, but I showed her the language that said nothing about authorized retailers. Then I showed her a screen shot from the Lenovo website showing that my computer model is serviced by Visonic in Madrid.

So now I showed that this met the requirements for coverage provided by their IWS policy as described on the website. She said the computer is definitely not covered but now understood why I would have thought it was and she said she would look into the matter and asked me for a call the following day.

I prepared for another battle after this 45 minute talk, but to my surprise I was told that in fact they had authorized a refund for the purchase! But there was one requirement (and you will not believe this), I was told I had to destroy the computer and was even given 2 potential means of destruction: I could "run it over with a car or smash it to pieces with a hammer" and then take photos of the destroyed computer and send it to her. They were not willing to replace it or fix it. But to process the refund I would need to prove it was demolished.

I explained that I was hesitant to do so without receiving a signed document confirming it. She told me it is authorized and told me I would have to trust her. So I went outside (against my better judgement) and smashed the band new laptop to pieces (I have to admit it was fun to take out this frustration even though I realized that this was not safe nor environmentally friendly, but it was my only option for a refund). As I smashed it, the battery it popped and started releasing a huge cloud of toxic smoke and I burnt my fingers pretty bad. I then had to wait for it to cool, and take a picture, then lug around the toxic garbage for the day as I was afraid to leave it in my house, yet I didn't want to throw it away until I received the refund.

I sent the pictures and explained that they should not recommend this in the future as it is dangerous and bad for the environment (and insane). She said that's what they are usually asked to tell customers to do , utterly bizarre. Imagine if I had not been smart enough to do this outside, it could have been very dangerous and they would have had a lawsuit on their hands. After 3 or 4 days my refund was received!

The general lesson learned is never buy Lenovo, as I am not the only one who deals with this treatment. Hundreds online have similar stories They seem to use this treatment as a cost cutting measure to test your will and save on repair costs. They obviously don't care about the price in damage to the Lenovo brand. I am amazed they can have success with this policy. Anyhow, the other lesson is persistence can pay off. I probably should have just quit weeks earlier as it may not have been worth the stress and countless hours wasted, but in the end it was a bit of justice and I feel vindicated and am happy to be able to buy another computer with the refunded money. The problem is my research still led me back to Lenovo as a good buy in the 2-in-1 form factor. Of course I did not buy it, I went with the HP Envy x360 and am currently waiting for it to arrive. Lets hope I don't have to deal with any problems with this one!

Thanks again for the help guys. Great community you have here standing up to corporations who take advantage of customers and helping consumers!

Edited by moderator to remove phone number.
Aside from the battery problem, it must have been gratifying to beat the computer to pieces. I hope you used a big hammer with a long handle.

You will now have an HP with likely a better experience and a US company that will stand behind it. Fortunately, the chances of getting 2 lemons in a row is small.
 
Jun 30, 2017
849
785
93
Maui Hawaii
#34
Is it possible to edit the post? I am not sure if its a good idea to post her name and number. Can the mods do that please? I would say despite the fact the was difficult at first, she was the only one who actually listened to my concern and when shown the truth , she agreed with me and even admitted it was Lenovo's error. She also was the one who then made sure I got the refund and was professional in follow up. So I am grateful for the help she provided. And it did seem that she was in fact told by superiors, and maybe regularly, to give those instructions, so I dont think she is at fault for the general policy of stonewalling and neglect.
An email to Lenovo CS praising Debbie for her help in resolving your issue would be a nice thing to do.
 
Jun 30, 2017
849
785
93
Maui Hawaii
#35
One last piece of advice: Get an outboard hard drive and auto-back up your data daily, or use the cloud for backup. Your chance of having a second "lemon" is small but not zero.
 
Likes: jsn55

Barry Graham

Administrator
Staff Member
Director
Jan 7, 2015
927
823
93
#36
I worked for Lenovo and this really is not like them. I also am stunned you were told to destroy your laptop when that is so dangerous. Even though I don't work there anymore it's still my preferred laptop brand and they are one of the only manufacturers that make their PC's in America despite not being a US company.
 
Sep 27, 2018
10
2
1
36
#37
I worked for Lenovo and this really is not like them. I also am stunned you were told to destroy your laptop when that is so dangerous. Even though I don't work there anymore it's still my preferred laptop brand and they are one of the only manufacturers that make their PC's in America despite not being a US company.
HI Barry, yes I was pretty shocked as well as my last computer was a Lenovo and I was very happy with it. In fact I actually really liked this new computer before it died. Lemons happen, but what happens next is what counts. I would have been fine receiving a repaired or new version of the same laptop but after this disaster I can never buy Lenovo again and subject myself to that risk.based on principle alone I think it would be wrong to go back to them even though I like their products. The service is a deal breaker for me.

In fact, based on your recommendation a former colleague of yours from Lenovo reached out to me today to apologize and admit their fault. They said this request to destroy the computer is not protocol and that they need to review/improve protocols to prevent this in the future. He was genuinely apologetic and did admit some limitations of their customer service. But I don't think he really understood how bad the service was. I can honestly say that in 36 years I have never had an experience this bad with any company (and I've had many, hello Comcast and Sprint). I think maybe the people in corporate in North Carolina are good but it's tough to get through to them unless u can find a resource like this forum! The default customer service is atrocious and they better figure it out when other companies really focus on this aspect (dell and apple in particular).

I also think they need to clean up their warranty. Hp offers worldwide warranty valid in any country, Asus offers 2 year warranty standard. This seemed like a surreptitious attempt to convince potential buyers that the international waranty is valid in any country where the products are sold but it's not the case. This would have been simpler if tariffs)duties didn't prevent me from sending it to USA to get fixed.

Thanks again guys!
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
7,317
7,139
113
San Francisco
#38
Hi, I want to reply to this threat to thank everyone for their input and give an update.

I finally got the refund just last week thanks in part to the help I received on this forum. Sorry for not replying as I stopped receiving email notifications about this thread so I thought that there were no new posts. I just came back to update and saw these posts, so thank you all.

So one member (weihlac) posted a link to Lenovo corporate offices in North Carolina and so I called the numbers provided and left a message. I was eventually contacted by a woman named Debbie Mitchell. I explained everything very carefully and provided proof such as weblinks and screen shots as well as forwarding emails from other agents and I built my case. It was a very long-winded email but I felt I laid out the crux of my complaint very well. I did not receive a response and so I decided to call again.

Debbie was at first very dismissive as every other agent and case manager was. I was told the computer isn't covered and that is it and she essentially tried to get rid of me. She continually "moved the goalpost" in terms of her explanations of why my warranty was being denied and the story changed numerous times. At some point I took offense to the treatment I was receiving (not as much by her, but the cumulative beating over 6 weeks of emails and calls with probably a dozen agents) and I raised my vice and made it very clear that I was not going away and that I objected to the treatment I had been receiving as a paying customer who received a defective product. I went on a bit of a rant and made it very clear that she needed to stop cutting me off and listen to my complaint rather than dismissing it. She could sense my extreme frustration and eventually apologized and for the first time someone listened.

We went over the email and I realized she had never even read it and was not familiar with my complaint. I forwarded an email from Lenovo saying the laptop is covered and giving me Visonic as a service agent. I told her how can a consumer be expected to untangle the web of language if their own employees can't even tell if its covered or not. We went over the evidence and I proved to her that the info on the website made it clear my computer is covered in any country where the machine is sold and where the machine is serviced. I then showed her that the machine is sold in Spain through a weblink to FNAC (its like the best buy of Europe, an international company based out of France). At first she said they aren't authorized etc and tried to get around that, but I showed her the language that said nothing about authorized retailers. Then I showed her a screen shot from the Lenovo website showing that my computer model is serviced by Visonic in Madrid.

So now I showed that this met the requirements for coverage provided by their IWS policy as described on the website. She said the computer is definitely not covered but now understood why I would have thought it was and she said she would look into the matter and asked me for a call the following day.

I prepared for another battle after this 45 minute talk, but to my surprise I was told that in fact they had authorized a refund for the purchase! But there was one requirement (and you will not believe this), I was told I had to destroy the computer and was even given 2 potential means of destruction: I could "run it over with a car or smash it to pieces with a hammer" and then take photos of the destroyed computer and send it to her. They were not willing to replace it or fix it. But to process the refund I would need to prove it was demolished.

I explained that I was hesitant to do so without receiving a signed document confirming it. She told me it is authorized and told me I would have to trust her. So I went outside (against my better judgement) and smashed the band new laptop to pieces (I have to admit it was fun to take out this frustration even though I realized that this was not safe nor environmentally friendly, but it was my only option for a refund). As I smashed it, the battery it popped and started releasing a huge cloud of toxic smoke and I burnt my fingers pretty bad. I then had to wait for it to cool, and take a picture, then lug around the toxic garbage for the day as I was afraid to leave it in my house, yet I didn't want to throw it away until I received the refund.

I sent the pictures and explained that they should not recommend this in the future as it is dangerous and bad for the environment (and insane). She said that's what they are usually asked to tell customers to do , utterly bizarre. Imagine if I had not been smart enough to do this outside, it could have been very dangerous and they would have had a lawsuit on their hands. After 3 or 4 days my refund was received!

The general lesson learned is never buy Lenovo, as I am not the only one who deals with this treatment. Hundreds online have similar stories They seem to use this treatment as a cost cutting measure to test your will and save on repair costs. They obviously don't care about the price in damage to the Lenovo brand. I am amazed they can have success with this policy. Anyhow, the other lesson is persistence can pay off. I probably should have just quit weeks earlier as it may not have been worth the stress and countless hours wasted, but in the end it was a bit of justice and I feel vindicated and am happy to be able to buy another computer with the refunded money. The problem is my research still led me back to Lenovo as a good buy in the 2-in-1 form factor. Of course I did not buy it, I went with the HP Envy x360 and am currently waiting for it to arrive. Lets hope I don't have to deal with any problems with this one!

Thanks again for the help guys. Great community you have here standing up to corporations who take advantage of customers and helping consumers!

Edited by moderator to remove phone number.
OH
MY
GOD,
csenoner
This is the BEST story I remember on this forum, and I've been here since the beginning! Smash it to smithereens and take a photo? You can't make this stuff up. I am filled with admiration of your persistence. Obviously you can explain things very clearly. I too have used the "raised voice" approach when encountering some idiot who is trying to solve a problem that she hasn't even bothered to understand. It's risky, but sometimes the only way to get them to THINK and do their jobs. HUGE congratulations, you should be very proud of yourself and your skills and I hope that very soon you are back up to speed with a laptop that works and can get on with your life in Espana.
 
Likes: Nancy