Left at Port Nassau last week with my whole family - need help suggestions??

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Neil Maley

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Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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www.promalvacations.com
#21
@nicholas gainsbrugh what I am getting from your ship is that the anxiety you incurred as a result of missing the ship (by your own volition) was further compounded when you unexpectedly received personal belongings from the port agent.

This was both a blessing and a curse.

A blessing because, due to policy and procedures of the ship, you had what you needed to be able to catch the ship. A curse because there was a sense of being violated by both RCCL and the port agent. RCCL violated your personal cabin space and you felt another personal violation having your items left with a foreign stranger. A stranger whom now has access to initiate details of who you are, and can cause damage.

My take away from your post is that RCCL (all ships) needs to do a much better job of ensuring that passengers fully understand the policy and procedure as to what occurs when you miss the ship.

I am sure that the cruise line would argue that the details are spelled out in the cruise contract that you agreed to when you purchased your passage. As we all know, barely anyone reads that very long document.

Perhaps they can better communicate this policy by printing the information on the daily schedule that they leave in your cabin? By posting it on the tv? by announcing it at the life jacket drill?

My take is that you feel violated by their behavior. I couldn't agree more. Please understand, what they did is their policy. I think the solution here is to find ways where they can educate their guests directly/overtly on that policy, so that no one else feels violated.

The benefit to directly educating their guests is that passengers can now start to plan for that scenario.

I can now plan for the possible event that, if I am late and the ship is going to sail without me, that they will be looking for items X, Y and Z to leave at the port for me. I will store them in my safe so they will find them and make sure I get them, in the event of a mishap where I miss the ship.

anyways, that's my thoughts
And make sure you take the daily newsletter off the ship with you along with passports and credit cards in case you do miss the ship.
 
Aug 29, 2015
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#22
One more note: cruise lines guarantee that if a cruise line excursion is late, they will wait OR get you to the next port and care for you in that process. Usually they wait.

A friend of mine was on a cruise a few years ago, and went on a catamaran trip that was purchased through the cruise line. The engine of the catamaran gave out. The wind was blowing the wrong way, and they took quite a while to sail back to where they were to leave the catamaran and transfer back to the ship. The ended up being 4 hours late. The ship pulled out of the port, as it had to give up its berth, but dropped anchor in the harbor. The group on the excursion finally arrived back to port, and they were shuttled in a tender back to the ship. It happens. He was glad they were on a ship purchased excursion.

I was on one in 2014 in Belize where the engine decided not to work as well as we were headed back to the ship. We got back a mere 15 minutes after the ship was to leave (Belize is a tender port) so it wasn't much of an issue. I later asked what would have happened if we would have been significantly delayed, since we were at some little Cay. No answer.

Life happens. You make the best of it and go on. In each instance, including the original letter writers instance, no one was seriously injured, no one died, things just didn't go as planned.

That reminds me, I need a new cheap water proof watch for my next cruise.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
6,651
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San Francisco
#23
Thanks Neil. It sounds like the daily newsletter is an important document to have when leaving the ship, and that there is tolerance for a short wait (10 min or so).

But I am unclear as to what the OP wants? A copy of written procedures? Certainly to know what final charges if any.

It certainly must have been difficult with children. Is anything missing from luggage?
I think that he is unhappy about the 'way he was treated'. He feels abandoned by RCCL. He wants to know what happened when he didn't show up for the departure.

I tried to explain to him earlier that nobody is going to tell him exactly what happened ... they're not going to interview everyone involved with searching his cabin and offloading his possessions so they can give him a report. They followed their procedures and I don't think that our OP is being reasonable in wanting an explanation from the cruise line. He made a mistake, the cruise line followed their policy. Not much more can be said.
 
Likes: Algebralovr

Carrie Livingston

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Jan 6, 2015
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#24
I believe general procedure is for ship's security officer and someone else (can't remember who) will go into the guest's cabin and look in the safe for anything that might be needed by the pax to either catch up with the ship or return to the departure port and wait for the ship depending on where they are in the cruise.

It's common knowledge to take the daily off the ship with you in case there is a problem. That way you'll have the port agent's information in case you need to get anything the ship might have left behind. I almost always carry my passport with me in my bag so at least that's not a concern.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
6,651
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San Francisco
#26
This was an unexpected event for the OP. Although I have cruised several times, I really did not understand the process which occurs when a passenger is late to board. I guess I really never thought about it. Now I am aware and informed. Thank you.
Exactly! I learned lots from this thread. Not that I'd ever miss a sailing, of course ... unless hospitalized and sedated ... miss dinner? Are you kidding? Everything my colleagues have stated is plain common-sense information but I just never thought about it. Very glad for the education.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#27
And one thing that is not mentioned, and was not a factor in this instance, is the time zone that is applicable to that port. This is something we have elevated in its importance as we travel because it's so easy to forget about and then an event is missed because the actual time is earlier/later than thought. And we add to that research to show what hours our destinations are open.

Cell phones certainly help with all this, but we have found, especially when cruising, that cell towers are not always reachable and thus we always print out a +1, -4, etc. on our itinerary so we don't miss the time change.

And we ensure that our contacts know this as well in case the need arises for them to contact us ...
 
Likes: jsn55

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
6,651
6,644
113
San Francisco
#28
And one thing that is not mentioned, and was not a factor in this instance, is the time zone that is applicable to that port. This is something we have elevated in its importance as we travel because it's so easy to forget about and then an event is missed because the actual time is earlier/later than thought. And we add to that research to show what hours our destinations are open.

Cell phones certainly help with all this, but we have found, especially when cruising, that cell towers are not always reachable and thus we always print out a +1, -4, etc. on our itinerary so we don't miss the time change.

And we ensure that our contacts know this as well in case the need arises for them to contact us ...
So true - my watch gets re-set on the airplane ... learned from bitter experience how important that is.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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1,962
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#29
So true - my watch gets re-set on the airplane ... learned from bitter experience how important that is.
Yes, so did we when cruising Hawaii and then Alaska. Very important in the planning stages too as we needed to adjust our sleeping habits accordingly.