Hyundai Wants To Charge Me For Excess Tire Wear On My Car With 16,898 Miles

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Feb 26, 2019
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It's a long story but will try to shorten in. Leased a 2015 Hyundai Genesis in Feb 2016 with 2728 miles on it and was told it was driven by the manager of the dealership. Immediately we had problems with the alignment and when we took it in, found it was totally out of alignment! There were many other things that just did not feel right with that car and we even sent for a car fax. And in the course of the 3 year lease we put on an additional 14,170 miles so it was returned with 16,898. Among our many problems, we had many dead batteries and the last time someone came to boost the car, he noticed that the rear tires looked bald to him.
We took the car to our local tire store and the technician told us that this car had been abused (he was aware of the alignment problem) and that he had never seen tires so bad with such low mileage. We put on 2 new tires (Michelin paid a partial amount) and he told us the front tires looked fine.
Now we are faced with this invoice from the leasing company with a charge of $400 for the disposition fee and another $390 plus $55.30 tax for wear and tear on the tires. When we returned the car to Hyundai on January 27th, the gentleman who signed off on the car mentioned nothing about tires and this car was pristine. Obviously, we do very little driving and I have to admit to my age of 83 and my husband hardly ever drives at 94.
I called Hyundai Leasing, they said I had to call Hyundai Care and they said no, Leasing handles this so it was a game of ping pong. Eventually, someone checked it for me and gave me the answer I knew was coming and that was that they could do nothing for me.
I would like to add that I tried to get this car returned through the lemon law, but was not successful. There are case numbers with Hyundai for me so there is plenty of history on the problem with this car from the beginning. I did receive one month's lease returned in the form of a check so they knew they were treading on thin ice.
I feel this is a travesty and am very upset. Can anyone offer me some advice?
 
Feb 26, 2019
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Excessive Wear ands Use. You may be charged for excessive wear based on our standards for normal use and for mileage in excess of 10,000 miles per year at the rate of $.20 per mile. And of course, the $400 disposition fee if I do not lease another Hyundai.
 

AMA

Verified Member
Dec 11, 2014
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#4
Do you have a copy of the document you signed when you turned the car in? Does it say anything about the tires or other damage?
 
Feb 26, 2019
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I do have a copy and there is nothing written on there at all other than the odometer reading which was 16,898 and other pertinent information regarding the vehicle (vin etc.)
 

Barry Graham

Administrator
Staff Member
Director
Jan 7, 2015
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#6
Is the leasing company the one that Hyundai uses or is it one not associated with Hyundai? If it's the Hyundai leasing company my thought is that you have a claim against the dealer and should be working with them to resolve this, otherwise taking it to Hyundai corporate.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Feb 26, 2019
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The leasing company is Hyundai Leasing. Yesterday I spoke with the party who took the car back from us at lease end and he said he would speak with the GM BUT the end result was that he could not help me. He said they went over my records and found I did not have my tires rotated and this seems to be the main reason. After getting this result, I emailed the same GM with a long and detailed history of my problems and as of this morning, I have not had a reply. I did speak with the Leasing department and they would not help me. Will wait to see if I get an email from the GM and if not, will go to corporate.
Thank you -
 

johnbaker

Verified Member
Oct 2, 2014
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#8
@terri232 I'm a former automotive engineer and worked for one of the big 3. I spent most of my time doing work on the quality side of the business.

If you didn't have your tires rotated, you could have very easily caused uneven tire wear even with the small number of miles you drive. $390 is fairly inexpensive for a mounted set of OEM tires.

I haven't seen the car or the pictures but almost every manufacturer / leasing agent has an inspection checklist. On it, they will list what constitutes excess wear. If your tire meets that standard, you get charged. There really isn't any leeway at all for the dealership. If you don't pay it, they have to pay it.

If you opt to lease / purchase another vehicle, make sure to have your tires rotated at every oil change. It will help you from having this issue in the future.
 
Likes: Neil Maley

Barry Graham

Administrator
Staff Member
Director
Jan 7, 2015
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@terri232
If you didn't have your tires rotated, you could have very easily caused uneven tire wear even with the small number of miles you drive. $390 is fairly inexpensive for a mounted set of OEM tires.
You are right, under normal circumstances except that @terri232 said in the first post that there was good reason to believe the wear and tear was already there and exacerbated by issues that came with the car.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#10
What I've read so far:
  • At 2,728 miles you are told it is "totally" out of alignment
  • You proceeded to drive it for another 14,000 miles
  • The last time car was "boosted" (dead battery) the tech stated rear tires looked bald. Local tire store then states car "had been abused". Rear tires were replaced, but new ones "looked fine".
Questions that remain:
  • At 2,728 miles, did you have them perform an alignment (your post did not say)? If not you may be liable . . .
  • At what mileage were the rear tires replaced? This will tell how far you drove since then which has bearing on the condition of the tires.
  • Do you still have an invoice for the rear tires that were replaced? This is proof that will aid your case . . .

In my opinion:

To prevail, you need to prove an alignment was done and the rear tires were replaced. A letter from the tire store re:abuse would also be helpful.​
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Sep 20, 2018
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#11
I'm going to guess it's like this:

The two replaced tires are fine.
The two initial tires are street-legal, but worn down more than the leasing company expects for a car with miles this low, and will need replacement before the car is sold, probably as a Certified Pre-Owned vehicle.

This wear could have been caused by one of a number of things:
- The initial alignment problem and/or abuse. Unfortunately, that issue is not Hyundai Financial's problem. All they care about is that the car has more wear than the lease allows for; they aren't concerned how it got to that point. It would be like expecting your Sears Mastercard to intervene in warranty disputes about your Kenmore washing machine. You'd think that Hyundai Financial would be beholden to Hyundai of America, but for various reasons, they are mostly separate entities.
- Failure to rotate the tires. The tires should have been rotated at least once, and if the front tires are the same ones that have been on the car since it was new, then, yep, they are probably worn more than they should be.

In the end, your beef is likely with the dealership, but I don't have high hopes for your chances of recovery there.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Feb 26, 2019
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#12
Firstly, to answer some of your questions above:
1. Of course the alignment was done when we brought the car to our Hyundai dealership after we drove it for approximately 2 weeks
2. The rear tires were replaced at about 15,000 miles
3. Yes, I have the invoice
BUT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
UPDATE: SInce the GM never replied to my email, I then followed Chris's suggestions and sent one to the primary contact who did not respond and then to the secondary. I just received a phone call from his office and after their looking into my tire problem, they agreed with me that there should not have been excessive wear and tear and they have written off the charge for the tires! Hooray!