hotel peepholes too high for short people

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Mar 18, 2016
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#42
Oh, I know what you mean ... my Virgin Atlantic jammies are always in my suitcase unless I'm going to the tropics. As far as "stuff" goes, I probably pack more stuff than wearing apparel. I tried traveling light once, I didn't like it! Way back when, my husband objected to the size of my suitcase. I gave him $2 and said "Here, hire a porter". That was the end of that discussion; now he's worse than I am.
Judy, I'm enjoying this thread. Brings back lots of memories. As to luggage, I subscribe to Peter Greenberg's philosophy, "There are two types of luggage, carry-on and lost." I'm not so much concerned with loss as I hate waiting at a carousel. Back when we did check bags, ours always seemed to be the last ones out. Probably because we always checked in early. Probably bags first in are the last out. Also, by limiting ourselves to carry-on size bags, we find it easier to negotiate narrow European streets, and tiny spaces for luggage on European rail. We use Eagle Creek bags to organize things, and never fully unpack. Just use our suitcases on luggage racks like open drawers in a bureau. It's kind of a Zen thing. I have so much at home already, it's good for me to realize how little I really need. Keeps me from buying more 'stuff.'
 
Likes: jsn55
Mar 18, 2016
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#44
LOL, heaven forbid a hotel in Japan call a Japanese item by its Japanese name!! Too funny!
Yes, but the item at the Conrad is not, in point of fact, a 'yukata.' I know what that looks like. The Conrad supplies a 'below the knee' loose shirt, 'to the wrist' Western style sleeves, with Western style collar, and buttons all the way down the front, no belt. A similar garment was offered at the ANA Kyoto. For sure, not a yukata. We had those at the Hyatt Hotel in Hakoni. All of this is making me long to return to the best country I've ever visited. Clean, honest, kind, helpful people, wonderful food. The best train station snacks ever!
 
Likes: AMA
Nov 3, 2015
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#45

Carol Phillips

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Dec 28, 2014
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#46
Dear cp556: I think we need to start a movement: Lower peepholes.

A home I had built a number of years ago had a very tall general contractor ... probably 6'7". I got there late in the day they'd installed the thermostat, and he went to show me how to use it. I reached my arm wayyyyyy up and just looked at him. It was lowered the next day :)

But you're right, @eaglebird - Lower Peepholes for the People ! :)
 

Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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#47
A home I had built a number of years ago had a very tall general contractor ... probably 6'7". I got there late in the day they'd installed the thermostat, and he went to show me how to use it. I reached my arm wayyyyyy up and just looked at him. It was lowered the next day :)

But you're right, @eaglebird - Lower Peepholes for the People ! :)
But again- you cant see the face of whoever is knocking at the door with a lower peephole so what good is it?
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#48
I just arrived in Lexington, Kentucky at my favorite Campbell House. I thought of all the Elliott Forum Advocates when I ordered dinner ... there was a knock on my door and I instantly flung it open without a look or a query!! Yes, it was room service. I guess that's my idea of living dangerously these days.
 
Mar 18, 2016
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#49
Mar 18, 2016
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#50
But again- you cant see the face of whoever is knocking at the door with a lower peephole so what good is it?
No. Think about it. I'm talking about lowering the peephole about six inches. Still able to see who is outside. Unless person is standing against the door, which people don't usually do. Also, can always call out and ask person to step back a bit. Then again, I might not open the door to such a person.
 

Neil Maley

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#51
I don't open the door at all unless it's room service or for a room problem I called for. Why on earth would anyone need to open the door if they didn't call for anything in their room? Is someone going to surprise you with the Publisher Clearing house check?

Just don't open the door.
 
Nov 3, 2015
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#52
I don't open the door at all unless it's room service or for a room problem I called for. Why on earth would anyone need to open the door if they didn't call for anything in their room? Is someone going to surprise you with the Publisher Clearing house check?
I've never gotten a Publisher's Clearing House check, but I did get rousted out of bed in the middle of the night once by a local police department for a tornado warning. The officer did overcome my suspicions by slipping one of his cards under the door.
 

Neil Maley

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#53
And that's the only reason I can see someone coming to the door- the place is on fire or there is an emergency like that but I think you'd have been aware of possible tornados by the weather report when you went to bed.

Really, how many people have someone knock on their hotel room door that aren't delivering food or fixing something you called about? I travel several times a year and the only one who have ever knocked is housekeeping.
 

AMA

Verified Member
Dec 11, 2014
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#54
I'm also vertically challenged, but generally open the door with the lock on to inspect the person's hotel ID. A person would have to be pretty strong to break one of those non-chain "locks" that are standard these days. If I'm not expecting anything I do call down to the front desk. However, I am always mindful of the woman who was killed by someone who claimed to be a hotel employee delivering a mini-fridge. Very scary for women traveling alone.
 

AMA

Verified Member
Dec 11, 2014
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#55
PS - Marriott is the best. Their employees NEVER enter your room without your approval. The standard greeting is "May I enter your room?" while they are standing in the hall after you open the door. Gold stars for that.
 

Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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#56
I'm also vertically challenged, but generally open the door with the lock on to inspect the person's hotel ID. A person would have to be pretty strong to break one of those non-chain "locks" that are standard these days. If I'm not expecting anything I do call down to the front desk. However, I am always mindful of the woman who was killed by someone who claimed to be a hotel employee delivering a mini-fridge. Very scary for women traveling alone.
Had she called down asking for one?I asked my wife about this who travels a lot on her own and she told me she never opens the door but no one ever knocks unless she has called for something. She refuses to order room service if she's by herself too, she'd rather bring something in. She tells me when she is in for the night she is locked and double locked. She only peers through the door chain if I am with her.
 
Likes: AMA
Nov 3, 2015
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#58
And that's the only reason I can see someone coming to the door- the place is on fire or there is an emergency like that but I think you'd have been aware of possible tornados by the weather report when you went to bed.
Warnings were not issued until spotters had confirmed a tornado on the ground until the development of Doppler radar. And something that was predicted to hit as a squall line sometimes did hit as tornadoes even the development and deployment of Doppler.

There are still bad weather events we don't understand well -- cold-core tornadoes in the PNW for instance, like the January 2008 tornado in Vancouver, WA.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Mar 18, 2016
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#60
Dear cp556: I think we need to start a movement: Lower peepholes.
My thanks to all who have replied to my original post. It seems I am not the most paranoid person out there. Or, the only short one. My question was meant to ask if there is a 'hotel standard.' For sure, I do not rely on the peephole alone, but if a creepy person is at my door, I can then call down to the front desk and alert them to my concern. Also, perhaps hotels ought to provide clean uniforms of some sort for all staff, with hotel name clearly embroidered on them. And, really, IMHO, for tall people to bend down a bit does not seem so terrible to me. I'm not expecting peepholes to be at navel height. Sixty inches from the floor seems about right to me. And, there are many hotels with peepholes at about this height.

Also, as to whose shower heads that are too high, I am at the mercy of whoever last adjusted the spray pattern. Or, I need to call my husband to reach in and adjust it for me. For me to stand on tiptoe in order to make adjustments seems less than safe. Many hotels do have showerheads a bit lower. Surely not so low that a tall person would knock his/her head into it.

Again, thanks to all for weighing in. This is a great forum.