Help from Verizon

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Oct 30, 2015
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North Laurasia
#1
Hello, Mr. Elliott, I've been having issues with Verizon, which provides both my cell phone service and is my internet service provider. I can only use my cell phones in my kitchen, because elsewhere in the house, the signal drops to NO bars. On the best of days, I get two.

Recently I have had troubles getting online, accessing email, and just generally having lousy reception. You know when you check your upload and download speed, it's expressed in Megabytes? Well, I get zero's. The fastest I've gotten is much less than 1 megabyte, and recently, Verizon slowed it down even more. I called them and while the man on the phone was very kind, he couldn't help me. He was too much a bottom feeder to be able to rectify things.

So, taking your advice to make my complaint short and sweet, I sent a one page email to the third man down the company contact totem pole, Hans Vestberg. I'm a writer, so proper spelling and grammar come automatically to me, and I'm always polite, even in the most aggravating of situations. I learned a long time ago that courtesy costs nothing. I included my service address, email address, two phone numbers and my Verizon account number.
The next day I got a phone call from "Jennifer". She said she worked for Hans Vestberg. She was VERY kind, very helpful and said she would do some deeper research into my problem.
She gave me her phone number and promised to call back. The next day, she did and sad to say, while she couldn't solve my speed problems, she did explain why it was so..basically, I live in the boonies bordered by hills and forest. Until Verizon provides 5G service to us in the country, which is probably the same time that my horses grow wings and fly, I am stuck with 3G on a good day and 0G on the rest.
That's not a thing she can fix, because Verizon has no interest in installing new cell towers for a handful of ranchers and farmers.

So I'm still plodding along at a snail's pace with my internet, and sometimes can read my email when it finally loads, but I did have a good experience with a live human being at Verizon.

So thank you for your advice, and your company contact. As I said earlier, I am always polite and courteous. Jennifer was, too.
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
2,368
2,894
113
Maui Hawaii
#2
Hello, Mr. Elliott, I've been having issues with Verizon, which provides both my cell phone service and is my internet service provider. I can only use my cell phones in my kitchen, because elsewhere in the house, the signal drops to NO bars. On the best of days, I get two.

Recently I have had troubles getting online, accessing email, and just generally having lousy reception. You know when you check your upload and download speed, it's expressed in Megabytes? Well, I get zero's. The fastest I've gotten is much less than 1 megabyte, and recently, Verizon slowed it down even more. I called them and while the man on the phone was very kind, he couldn't help me. He was too much a bottom feeder to be able to rectify things.

So, taking your advice to make my complaint short and sweet, I sent a one page email to the third man down the company contact totem pole, Hans Vestberg. I'm a writer, so proper spelling and grammar come automatically to me, and I'm always polite, even in the most aggravating of situations. I learned a long time ago that courtesy costs nothing. I included my service address, email address, two phone numbers and my Verizon account number.
The next day I got a phone call from "Jennifer". She said she worked for Hans Vestberg. She was VERY kind, very helpful and said she would do some deeper research into my problem.
She gave me her phone number and promised to call back. The next day, she did and sad to say, while she couldn't solve my speed problems, she did explain why it was so..basically, I live in the boonies bordered by hills and forest. Until Verizon provides 5G service to us in the country, which is probably the same time that my horses grow wings and fly, I am stuck with 3G on a good day and 0G on the rest.
That's not a thing she can fix, because Verizon has no interest in installing new cell towers for a handful of ranchers and farmers.

So I'm still plodding along at a snail's pace with my internet, and sometimes can read my email when it finally loads, but I did have a good experience with a live human being at Verizon.

So thank you for your advice, and your company contacts. As I said earlier, I am always polite and courteous. Jennifer was, too.
Have you tried installing a signal booster in your kitchen(https://www.verizonwireless.com/products/signal-boosters/ )? That may fix or at least significantly improve your situation. My daughter also lives in the woods and her Verizon signal is poor; this was improved with a signal booster. Fortunately, when I visit her my ATT signal is adequate at her house. Your reception is a function of your location and not something that Verizon will fix until they see the need to install more cell towers. If you are in a thinly populated area that may never happen.

You should also poll your friends and see who has ATT and T-Mobile and ask them to visit your house and see if they have a stronger signal. If one is better than yours, you should then change cell providers and keep your same telephone #. You should also ask your neighbors and see if any have satellite internet which may be a better choice for your location.
 
Oct 30, 2015
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North Laurasia
#3
Thank you for your advice! I DO have a booster but even it is only marginal in signal strength. And as for AT&T, we used to have it with our cell phones but you could only get a signal by going out to the front gate...about 150 feet from the house. Not so much fun when it's raining! T-mobile's signal is non-existant. So we're stuck with Verizon. And as for Hughes Satellite internet, I had the dish and it worked intermittently. What infuriated me...and led me to drop Hughes (now it's North Star or North sky or something, but it's still Hughes) was their snotty ''''customer service/tech support"". MY first inkling that it wasn't an up and up company was when the dish installer insisted I write the check for the work to his girlfriend. ???? That, and he insisted on an extra $100 to 'aim' the dish. Isn't that what part of installation includes? He didn't know that in the Army, I worked with satellite and microwave dishes and knew how to aim the little one Hughes sold. In addition, their customer service/Tech support was very bad. I had one woman at their phone number-judging from her heavily accented English I could tell I was talking to someone overseas.. tell me that I would have to just accept the service that they provided, whether it was good or not, basically, she said, Tough ---- it's what you get from us and we're the only ones doing satellite. She also implied that I was an idiot, HER computer showed the sun shining in my location when it was raining cats and dogs. So I dropped them.
It's okay. I can live with Verizon.
 
Likes: jsmithw
Mar 23, 2015
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#6
Not entirely 'on or off' topic, but if your cell service is consistently bad, I would definitely recommend keeping landline service in case you ever (god forbid* have a need to call 9-1-1. You do NOT want to be dependent upon flaky cell service in an emergency situation for sure! Also, kudos on your great attitude about the whole thing!
 
Jun 24, 2019
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#8
Not to belittle your frustrating situation, but we live within the Los Angeles city limits. The only internet we have is Spectrum, which is the direct descendant of Century Cable, Adelphia, and Time-Warner. The only TV we can get is Spectrum, other than over the air channels. We cannot get satellite service (DirecTV or similar) or satellite internet (Hughes) as we cannot "see" the satellite. No Spectrum competitor intends to build out a system which must be underground in a neighborhood with 100% Spectrum penetration. We have some nearby neighborhoods built out much more recently with AT&T service because when built, AT&T separately wired those neighborhoods.

Having Spectrum means we must pay for sports programming as a surcharge as Time-Warner bought exclusive rights to the Dodgers and Lakers. Fortunately, we're fans, but other simply have to pay.

Our daughter lived for a few years in a mid-western city in a building registered as a national historical building. As such, she was limited to Charter. No satellite dishes were permitted. It's an exception to the law.

We have kept our land-line as our Verizon service is not great at home. Reportedly, Verizon is better than AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile in our area. (Sprint and T-Mobile are merging; today's story is that 12 attorneys-general are challenging the merger.) One of the limiting factors is little land available for towers. Our son and daughter-in-law live in another area of Los Angeles with poor cell phone service because of no available land for towers, let alone community opposition.

I have attended a number of presentations about "competition" in the cable and telephone industries, including one where I was the moderator, and I've confounded the industry-side folks who want to talk about competition. I keep asking how we are going to get competition at the customer level, like me or our daughter, if there is only one provider.

Folks in rural areas, like our OP, face a similar situation in that competitors do not wish to build out a new system in an area in which a competitor already has near universal penetration. Running fiber optics directly to each house, even if one could do it on existing power poles, is a very expensive proposition.
 
Aug 30, 2015
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#9
Thank you for your advice! I DO have a booster but even it is only marginal in signal strength. And as for AT&T, we used to have it with our cell phones but you could only get a signal by going out to the front gate...about 150 feet from the house. Not so much fun when it's raining! T-mobile's signal is non-existant. So we're stuck with Verizon. And as for Hughes Satellite internet, I had the dish and it worked intermittently. What infuriated me...and led me to drop Hughes (now it's North Star or North sky or something, but it's still Hughes) was their snotty ''''customer service/tech support"". MY first inkling that it wasn't an up and up company was when the dish installer insisted I write the check for the work to his girlfriend. ???? That, and he insisted on an extra $100 to 'aim' the dish. Isn't that what part of installation includes? He didn't know that in the Army, I worked with satellite and microwave dishes and knew how to aim the little one Hughes sold. In addition, their customer service/Tech support was very bad. I had one woman at their phone number-judging from her heavily accented English I could tell I was talking to someone overseas.. tell me that I would have to just accept the service that they provided, whether it was good or not, basically, she said, Tough ---- it's what you get from us and we're the only ones doing satellite. She also implied that I was an idiot, HER computer showed the sun shining in my location when it was raining cats and dogs. So I dropped them.
It's okay. I can live with Verizon.
I"m not saying it is easy but it is likely possible if several of you were to get together as a group, find a path to where there is good connectivity to internet, and build a private wireless network - as long as you have places on someone's land to put up the repeaters. This is the modern equivalent of farmers banding together to put in phones back in the day.