Having a TSA when having a disability

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Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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New York
www.promalvacations.com
#23
As the recipient of to many to count pat downs over the years I can honestly say I have never been a victim of abuse, harassment or prejudice. I have been treated with respect by people doing their best to protect the safety of everyone getting on a plane.
From my observations of what my wife goes through I have to agree with you. She actually jokes with the agents because she is so used to the process and that gets a smile out of them. I think they appreciate when you acknowledge them and treat them with respect instead of being cranky.
 
May 22, 2018
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#24
Undergoing a thorough pat down is not abuse, harassment or prejudice. It’s proper procedure and the procedure goes whether you are man or woman, regardless of your race or religion. If you set off a metal detector you get an extensive body pay down. If you don’t want that - go through the body scanner if you have no medical devices that cannot go through.

The more you make a fuss out of it the more the agents are looking to do a thorough search to make sure you aren’t hiding anything.
I was referring to the subject in general terms, not this specific incident.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
6,617
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San Francisco
#25
Undergoing a thorough pat down is not abuse, harassment or prejudice. It’s proper procedure and the procedure goes whether you are man or woman, regardless of your race or religion. If you set off a metal detector you get an extensive body pay down. If you don’t want that - go through the body scanner if you have no medical devices that cannot go through.

The more you make a fuss out of it the more the agents are looking to do a thorough search to make sure you aren’t hiding anything.
YEAH! Helen!! Sometimes people need a little perspective about things. If the choice is being confined to bed vs dealing with the TSA for 5 minutes ... pretty easy decision.

Really, all this fuss about TSA is constantly fanned by the media. If you want to travel on an airplane, just deal with the TSA agents one-on-one. I make 25 flights a year on average, for the last 25 years. I think I've had 3 experiences that weren't very pleasant. Do I care? Nah, I'll never see those people again and couldn't care less what they think of me or my actions ... as long as they don't detain me.

I don't arrive late at the airport, I don't pack 42" screen TVs in my carryon, I don't try to bring a bottle of water through security. I dress neatly, I'm friendly and polite, I pay attention, I'm cooperative. I appreciate any efforts to be sure my airplane isn't used as a suicide bomb. I wouldn't dream of criticizing regular people who are doing their jobs. Everyone has a choice ... deal with airport reality or don't travel by air.
 
Aug 9, 2017
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#26
TSA is very clear about the precheck process with respect to handicapped individuals. Quoting:

"Disabilities and Medical Conditions
To ensure your security, all travelers are required to undergo screening at the checkpoint. You or your traveling companion may consult the TSA officer about the best way to relieve any concerns during the screening process. You may provide the officer with the TSA notification card or other medical documentation to describe your condition. If you have other questions or concerns about traveling with a disability please contact passenger support.

If you are approved to use TSA Pre✓® lane at a participating airport, you do not need to remove shoes, laptops, 3-1-1 liquids, belts, or light jackets during the screening process. You are required to undergo screening at the checkpoint by technology or a pat-down. Also, TSA officers may swab your hands, mobility aids, equipment and other external medical devices to test for explosives using explosives trace detection technology.

You are not required to remove your shoes if you have disabilities and medical conditions. However, your shoes must undergo additional screening including visual/physical inspection as well as explosives trace detection testing of the footwear. You can request to be seated during this portion of the screening."

Personally, I would not be inclined to get precheck if I was obviously handicapped. At least at my local "International" airport, people obviously handicapped, for instance in a wheelchair or using a walker, are directed to use the precheck lane. That may vary of course, airport to airport, airline to airline and of course is subject to the TSA personnel.
 
Likes: M Kelley
May 9, 2018
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#27
Btw- the original poster hasn’t even been back to read any of the replies so I’m not sure how important our replies are to her.
Sorry I haven't been able to post anything I do have work and it comes first. I have really appreciated every ones comments and has helped me see some things I would have never thought of. Thanks
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
6,617
6,628
113
San Francisco
#29
Thanks everyone for the information and comments. I have enjoyed reading and realizing it seems to be something I need to get use to. Thanks
Glad you've gained some perspective, MKelly. I neglected to mention that I have three artificial joints, so I always get a little bit extra, but on the scale of life's annoyances, that's about a 2.