GE Microwave/Oven Unit Destroyed by Self-Cleaning Cycle

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Apr 16, 2018
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#1
I am writing to see if anyone has any suggestions on the best way to proceed with this situation.

We used the self-cleaning cycle on our GE microwave/oven unit, and after doing so, the microwave stopped working. We had two repair companies look at the microwave (including GE's own service company) and both confirmed that it was indeed the self-cleaning cycle that destroyed the unit. We contacted GE customer support and they informed us the unit was no longer under warranty and they could offer a small discount on the parts. We tried to make our case that even though the product is no longer under warranty, a self-cleaning cycle that self-destructs is a product defect.

We were able to escalate the case to a customer service manager. She increased the repair discount slightly, but it is still going to cost us either $600 to repair the unit or $1,000 to replace it.

We've reviewed the recommendations on your site and have done our best to be polite and persistent and work our way up the chain. The company contacts that are listed are very high up and we weren't sure if that would be an appropriate next step. Any advice on the best way to proceed would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
 
#3
My understanding of your problem was that the extreme heat from the self-cleaning cycle of your oven ruined the microwave that is part of the combo. The microwave is located above the oven. Is this correct?

We have a GE Profile combo with that configuration.

You'd think it would be easy just to replace the microwave but the controls for both the micro and the oven are located on the microwave part of the unit, hence the high price.

What part of the microwave is ruined? Were the technicians specific about what's broken? There are discount parts sellers where you could purchase exactly what you need and any handy person should be able to handle the repair.

I assume the unit is out of warranty. How old is it? Any offer from GE is more than they are obligated to make but I'm sure there are less expensive fixes available.
 
Likes: rachel.bock1

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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12,684
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#4
My understanding of your problem was that the extreme heat from the self-cleaning cycle of your oven ruined the microwave that is part of the combo. The microwave is located above the oven. Is this correct?

We have a GE Profile combo with that configuration.

You'd think it would be easy just to replace the microwave but the controls for both the micro and the oven are located on the microwave part of the unit, hence the high price.

What part of the microwave is ruined? Were the technicians specific about what's broken? There are discount parts sellers where you could purchase exactly what you need and any handy person should be able to handle the repair.

I assume the unit is out of warranty. How old is it? Any offer from GE is more than they are obligated to make but I'm sure there are less expensive fixes available.

Now I understand. I couldn’t figure out why one needed a self cleaning microwave. This sounds look me terrible design.

Rachel, we have company contacts for GE. Have you only dealt well th Customer Service? Perhaps going further up the company to the Executives might help.

http://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/general-electric-ge/

Read our Customer Contact Page about how to write the the executIves and start with the first executive listed since you’ve dealt some things Customer Service.
 
Likes: rachel.bock1

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
6,617
6,629
113
San Francisco
#5
I am writing to see if anyone has any suggestions on the best way to proceed with this situation.

We used the self-cleaning cycle on our GE microwave/oven unit, and after doing so, the microwave stopped working. We had two repair companies look at the microwave (including GE's own service company) and both confirmed that it was indeed the self-cleaning cycle that destroyed the unit. We contacted GE customer support and they informed us the unit was no longer under warranty and they could offer a small discount on the parts. We tried to make our case that even though the product is no longer under warranty, a self-cleaning cycle that self-destructs is a product defect.

We were able to escalate the case to a customer service manager. She increased the repair discount slightly, but it is still going to cost us either $600 to repair the unit or $1,000 to replace it.

We've reviewed the recommendations on your site and have done our best to be polite and persistent and work our way up the chain. The company contacts that are listed are very high up and we weren't sure if that would be an appropriate next step. Any advice on the best way to proceed would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
Assuming that this was the first time you used the self-cleaning cycle, our Company Contacts are exactly where you want to go next, Rachel. Submit to the first exec, wait a week, and if no answer or you don't like what you hear, work your way up the ladder. While the unit is out of warranty, this is the kind of thing that should not be happening; I agree with you that it's a defect. Keep it concise and polite and please let us know the outcome.
 
Apr 16, 2018
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#6
Thank you all for your replies. Apologies for not explaining the details of the unit, but George got it exactly right.

To answer some of your questions, the unit was manufactured in April 2014. It was brand new when we bought our house in August 2014.

The techs did specify the parts that were ruined. I don't have the list on me at the moment, but I know for sure it was the magnetron tube, capacitor, and a couple of smaller parts. Originally one of the techs thought the control board was fried as well, but he cleaned some burnt residue from the leads, which stopped a buzzing noise that it was making. So he thought maybe the control board was fine. I am concerned that if we go with the repair option instead of replacing it, then some of the parts may start to go bad in the future if they were partially damaged. But $1,000 is too much to spend right now on the replacement.

We will reach out to the Company Contacts and also look into the discount part option.

Thank you again.