FEDEX delivered to wrong address

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Nov 21, 2019
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#1
I hope this is the right place to post this, but i was instructed to do so. So I own a small I.T. business and I had this kid send me his high end ($2000) laptop for a screen repair. Well the fedex guy gets to my neighborhood and takes it to the wrong house and leaves it. Then he marks it as delivered. First of all this kid trusted fedex to know what they were doing, and didn't purchase any extra insurance. Secondly I tried to file a claim, but i wasn't the shipper. Regardless after several calls to them i asked, well did you at least get the driver to go back and try to get the package from where he left it? But no they did not even contact the driver. They didn't care. So finally i convince this naive kid to file the claim, and walk him through it. Hes a young college kid and now he is struggling to even stay in school without it. He is totally devastated. After everything was said and done, they tried to offer him a hundred dollar check for it. He of course refused it! Is there someone high up in Fedex with some morals and values who wants to make this right! They are ruining this kids academics! Somebody please help.
 
Jul 30, 2018
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#2
How do you know it was delivered to the wrong address? Can you ask the owner of that house if they have the package? Did the young man at least pay for the FedEx service that requires a signature on delivery? If a signature was required there would be a record of the name and address of the person who signed for it.

Unfortunately, it wasn't a good choice to not insure such an expensive computer. This is what insurance is for; covering losses if the package goes missing of damaged.
 
Jul 30, 2018
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#4
Wanted to clarify my first post. If the package was delivered to the wrong house, are you certain he correctly wrote down your address on the shipping label?

Ask him to write to our company contacts; he needs to do this since he is the customer. State the facts in bullet point format and ask if they could attempt to trace the package. Leave out any emotion or extraneous information. Keep in mind the person reading the letter did not cause the problem yet is in position to help.
 
May 1, 2018
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#5
Why do you disparage your customer so much in your post? Calling him a kid, naive, young college kid, etc. It's great that you're trying to help, but there is no need to belittle him on a public forum, especially since it's largely irrelevant to the issue at hand.

Anyway, there is nothing you can do directly as the recipient. If fedex has already offered up the max insurance payout it pretty much means fedex has accepted liability for losing the package. I doubt there is anything to be done regarding a higher payout since there is no way for fedex to know what was in the box. As far as they are concerned, they shipped an item worth less than $100.

Is there someone high up in Fedex with some morals and values who wants to make this right!
How do you suggest they make it right? How can fedex know there was a laptop in the package, and how can they know it was worth $2,000? For all they know it could have been a worthless old bricked laptop - or even an actual brick for that matter. If the shipper didn't declare a value for the shipment, how can fedex know how to "make this right"?

In any case, I am dubious the insurance claim is even worth $2,000 because the laptop was broken according you your narrative. The absolute most a court would award in this case would be the actual value of a used broken laptop, not the $2,000 purchase price. Considering how quickly computers depreciate, I imagine a used broke laptop would have an actual value of a few hundred bucks at most.

Unfortunately, this is an expensive lesson for your customer.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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#6
If the student didn’t buy extra insurance, all Fed Ed owes him is the maximum $100 they are paying him. This is an unfortunate lesson for the kid in not buying additional insurance and there isn’t anything you can do for him. The only other option is to find out where Fed Ex delivered the computer and go there yourself to try to retrieve it.
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
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#7
" The only other option is to find out where Fed Ex delivered the computer and go there yourself to try to retrieve it. " Sounds like a recipe to get arrested (or worse).
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#8
I am not of the belief that it is disparaging to call someone naive who declined to pay for insurance- and young college kid is descriptive— as there are people in college of all ages. It is naive to assume that a package will be delivered undamaged.

If the college student does not need a high power computer for school work perhaps the student may be able to get by with a more inexpensive model.

The student should see if any homeowners/renters insurance (from parents perhaps) to cover the loss.
It would have cost approximately $10 for $1000 of insurance coverage.

I take it that no one contacted Fed Ex to say something was misdelivered. Or just took the package to the right address.
 
May 1, 2018
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#10
I would call the police. The computer is stolen. Maybe they can contact the neighbor.
And what good would that do? At best it's just a pyrrhic victory. Let's say the perp is caught and the laptop is recovered by the police. Sounds like good news right? Well fedex is going to retract their insurance offer because they didn't lose the package - it was stolen. The police are going to hold on to the laptop as the primary piece of evidence until the perp's trial concludes, which is at least 6 months away but probably closer to 12 months. Only at that point would they return the still-broken laptop to the owner. So the fact that the perp got caught and jailed will be little consolation to the owner of the laptop if they urgently needed it for school.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#11
And what good would that do? At best it's just a pyrrhic victory. Let's say the perp is caught and the laptop is recovered by the police. Sounds like good news right? Well fedex is going to retract their insurance offer because they didn't lose the package - it was stolen. The police are going to hold on to the laptop as the primary piece of evidence until the perp's trial concludes, which is at least 6 months away but probably closer to 12 months. Only at that point would they return the still-broken laptop to the owner. So the fact that the perp got caught and jailed will be little consolation to the owner of the laptop if they urgently needed it for school.
It would be helpful if you remember that we are here to advise people on self-advocation. There is no need to be argumentative or "instructive" in a condescending way. Just help the OP, that's what we're here for.
 
Apr 6, 2017
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#13
ok lets look at this--and its instructive. What isnt being stated is the Key advice for everyone which is dont buy 2000 dollars devices that break easily and get stolen. Esp a student--if its an APPLE laptop it will "walk away" even if left for a minute in the school library during a bathroom stop. And a minor liquid spill--cut of coffee--its done for. And slipping off a table...there are many fine laptops new for around 400 dollars with SSD and reasonable i5 or AMD processors and 8 gb RAM etc. Of even better--a corporate return refurb unit from a reliable seller--around 200 dollars for a decent laptop.
 
Likes: jsn55
Apr 1, 2018
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#14
And what good would that do? At best it's just a pyrrhic victory. Let's say the perp is caught and the laptop is recovered by the police. Sounds like good news right? Well fedex is going to retract their insurance offer because they didn't lose the package - it was stolen. The police are going to hold on to the laptop as the primary piece of evidence until the perp's trial concludes, which is at least 6 months away but probably closer to 12 months. Only at that point would they return the still-broken laptop to the owner. So the fact that the perp got caught and jailed will be little consolation to the owner of the laptop if they urgently needed it for school.
What insurance offer? For most any insurance claim, a police report is needed, and a police report could put more pressure on FedEx.

And the scenario you describe is just ONE possibility.
 
May 30, 2019
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#15
" The only other option is to find out where Fed Ex delivered the computer and go there yourself to try to retrieve it. " Sounds like a recipe to get arrested (or worse).
This ins't necessarily a bad option. If this is an example of FedEx ineptitude and not one involving scam artists, and if this is a good neighborhood, and if the described naive young student failed to include documentation such as the sender's info, the actual recipient could be at home scratching his/her head about the delivered package. Noting that, there are a lot of ifs and it has been several days so if the actual recipient would have contacted FedEx or checked with neighbors, that would have been done.

At this timeframe, I'd agree with Post #4 -- the sender (not the OP) contacts executives up the food chain. Sadly, I'm not optimistic that the student will get more than the already offered $100.
 
Dec 26, 2018
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#16
I agree with the everything said above, re: lack of insurance coverage making it impossible to prove the actual value of what was shipped.

But just to add something on involving police. I live in a Boston neighborhood that, for whatever reason, has consistent problems with local FedEx delivery. Drivers frequently fail to finish their routes, so packages listed as "on truck for delivery" end up back at the warehouse and rescheduled - which can repeat for several days, if they are ever in fact delivered. In the most egregious cases, we've found that drivers will sometimes scan packages on their trucks as "delivered" so it appears that they completed their route, without actually leaving the package anywhere. This has been most obvious in cases where the system records a street address based on the truck's position at the time of the scan that doesn't actually correspond to a house. When that happens, the package remains essentially lost because FedEx officially thinks it's been delivered.

My neighbors and I have complained multiple times to FedEx (including writing company contacts) but seen no meaningful changes. However, we discovered that involving local police as a last resort can be helpful. Amazingly, having the police show up at the local facility stating "we have a report that your drivers may be stealing packages" ALWAYS results in the packages being "miraculously" located and delivered within hours.

Of course, given the above, most of us in my neighborhood avoid using FedEx - but sometimes online purchases don't give an option for choosing shipping, and we're stuck with them.
 
Feb 3, 2017
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#17
As a business owner, I would take this as an opportunity to always inform your clients who are planning on shipping such items to you to always (1) require a signature at the address and (2) insure the item.

At least that way, some future younger people (or, anyone) who may not yet be wise about or experienced about how some things sometimes simply don't work out the way we intend, will have a heads up to, hopefully, have a better outcomes than this unfortunate young man.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#19
There are many reasons a student may need an expensive laptop— the student may be majoring in a subject that needs such equipment— graphic design, film and editing, computer programming with an emphasis on gaming (met someone’s nephew who was studying that).

Any expensive item should be insured during shipment and one needs to look at the FedEx options with the direct signature, indirect signature etc. if using fedex. One also needs to look at limitations — fedex has limitations on art works so most shippers have a separate policy and not one covered by FedEx.

I have gotten misdelivered mail and packages. If it is something small and light I walk it over to the right address (city living and no car).

It is disappointing that the person that received the package in error has not tried to contact the proper recipient.
 
Jul 30, 2018
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#20
It would be helpful if you remember that we are here to advise people on self-advocation. There is no need to be argumentative or "instructive" in a condescending way. Just help the OP, that's what we're here for.
Well said J! It is incredibly kind of the OP to help his young-adult client, who made an honest mistake out of youthful inexperience.

I've received mis-delivered packages and if the recipient is in my immediate neighborhood, I just walk it over to drop it off. Otherwise I post the info on the package on my neighborhood listserv.