Extortion of $ for aisle/window seats

  • Hi Guest, welcome to the help forum. You can get fast answers to your customer service questions here. We have a dedicated team of advocates who are ready to help. Just go to the section that matches your question and ask us!
  • If you've posted a question or issue for our advocates to assist with, please be sure to check back frequently for responses and requests for clarification.
  • Did you know you can get email notifications when something new posts to your favorite forum? It's easy. Just click the "watch" link right next to the "post new thread" button at the top of your favorite forum. The rest is easy. Now you'll never miss another conversation.
  • Want to become an expert user? Drop by the How to use this forum section and all will be revealed. We'll show you how to make the most of your experience.
Status
Not open for further replies.
Jan 8, 2019
15
0
1
37
#41
The basic premise is that an airline exists to create revenue ... as much revenue as possible. Add up your sales, deduct your expenses and your shareholders love you if you're making money. First thing the airlines did was reduce the size and pitch of seats to transport more passengers in a given plane, with given expense. That worked quite well; nobody stopped flying. They complained a great deal, but the airlines don't care.

They decided to keep fares as low as possible and charge passengers for whatever they wanted: a better seat, a checked bag, a meal. Many people, including me, think this is a very good plan. I want to check a bag and be comfortable. I don't care about the food or drink or entertainment. So I just pay for what I want.

This makes perfect sense to me as a business plan. If I have to book a short trip in coach, I want to be able to pay for the extra leg room and have a seat assignment (I understand it's not guaranteed, but I've never had to sit elsewhere). The problems arise when infrequent travellers encounter all this and are dismayed and perplexed. They often feel cheated, but really, it's just a matter of not knowing what they're buying.
Yes, I agree, it's a wonderful business plan, but I'm not a Delta shareholder, I'm a customer. I don't ask for much: if you sell me a main cabin ticket, make all main cabin seats that have not been already taken available to those checking in on a first come first serve basis rather than artificially block half of those seats in a classic bait and switch.
 
Mar 14, 2018
283
322
63
#42
Yes, I agree, it's a wonderful business plan, but I'm not a Delta shareholder, I'm a customer. I don't ask for much: if you sell me a main cabin ticket, make all main cabin seats that have not been already taken available to those checking in on a first come first serve basis rather than artificially block half of those seats in a classic bait and switch.
This is not "classic bait and switch" nor "extortion" nor any other legal offense.

If you don't like how Delta sells its seats, you can certainly express your displeasure by writing their management and/or not flying on them any more. There really are no other options.
 
Likes: jsn55

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
16,742
15,354
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#43
There isn’t much else we can comment on this. Since you didn’t book through Delta, you should go back to the website you booked through and find out why they showed no aisle seats.

I’m going to close this to further comments.
 
Likes: jsn55
Status
Not open for further replies.