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Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
16,733
15,351
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#22
Nathan Witt I did not read the OPs post as saying the police did anything wrong — it was the staff who made the horrible comments.

I suspect the police were told that the guest had not paid for the night — this hotel seems to require prepayment —- maybe as an airport hotel people leave early for flights.

I am uncertain if the police actually came or if it was an idle threat.
I think the police actually did come:
“. I was asked to leave by the police. The police said it was a civil matter and though the understand it was not my fault, since the manager has asked that i leave i will need to leave. “
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#23
I think the police actually did come:
“. I was asked to leave by the police. The police said it was a civil matter and though the understand it was not my fault, since the manager has asked that i leave i will need to leave. “
Sorry not enough coffee. Missed post #3.

All the police likely knew what there was a dispute about time of payment for hotel room and then was asked to leave.

I am hoping that the police were respectful
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#24
From post #3 above:

"I was asked to leave by the police. The police said it was a civil matter and though the understand it was not my fault, since the manager has asked that i leave i will need to leave."
 
Jun 27, 2017
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#27
Would it be a good idea for msngu to contact the Maryland division of the NAACP for advice? They have branches throughout the state. They might be able to help in this situation, because it seems very clear from msngu's side of the story that his civil rights were violated.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Jan 6, 2015
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#28
Involving multiple agencies/entities simultaneously breeds confusion and brings chaos. Perhaps down the line NAACP may be appropriately invited, but it's best, in my opinion, to wait for the corporate response. The grievance may be settled to the satisfaction of msngu at that point . . .
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#33
So they receive an "official" apology on old-fashioned company letterhead through the US mail? That's what a "written apology on behalf of ESA" would look like to me. An email apology doesn't mean much. I look for "some trappings" to add sincerity (compensation is great too).

Email: "You are now the proud recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor. Thank you for your service."​
Answer: "Where's my medal?"​

Just an old man's opinion . . .
 
Mar 15, 2018
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#34
I think you are making a good decision not jumping on it right away. They are worried about a lawsuit.
I expect they are also worried about media attention. This is the kind of story that could go viral.

Unlike some others in this thread, I considered this to be entirely the fault of the hotel, and I lay ZERO responsibility on the OP. I strongly disagree with anyone who suggested that the OP should have had to get out of bed to go down and untangle their own mistake. And I believe he was treated abominably both by the hotel staff, and by the police.
 

Dwayne Coward

Administrator
Staff Member
Director
Apr 13, 2016
558
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St. Louis
#35
So they receive an "official" apology on old-fashioned company letterhead through the US mail? That's what a "written apology on behalf of ESA" would look like to me. An email apology doesn't mean much. I look for "some trappings" to add sincerity (compensation is great too).

Email: "You are now the proud recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor. Thank you for your service."​
Answer: "Where's my medal?"​

Just an old man's opinion . . .
We see the snail mail ones too. Just not as often anymore, as most communications are done via email nowadays. I hate to say it, but at one time in my misspent youth, I sent out those apology letters for a well known OTA! :)
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#36
Understood. But in this case, with something this egregious, a more "official" apology is in order I think . . .
 
Mar 17, 2019
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#37
I expect they are also worried about media attention. This is the kind of story that could go viral.

Unlike some others in this thread, I considered this to be entirely the fault of the hotel, and I lay ZERO responsibility on the OP. I strongly disagree with anyone who suggested that the OP should have had to get out of bed to go down and untangle their own mistake. And I believe he was treated abominably both by the hotel staff, and by the police.
Thank you very much. Once I saw that some were making it to be my fault , i did not feel like pursuing the discussion any further here. Just provide the necessary update. I have emailed them that three complimentary nights does not cut it for me. i am still in a lot of emotional distress especially from all that banging on the walls and doors when they barged in. On the other hand i am not sure what type of compensation i want out of this , so i have asked for up till the end of the week to think about it.
 
Likes: VoR61

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
16,733
15,351
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#38
As far as most of us were concerned, this was the fault of the hotel and we are right with you on this.

I still think you might want to run this by an Equal Rights Attorney. We aren’t attorneys nor can we make any type of legal assumptions but I’d like you to make sure your civil rights weren’t violated. Most will at least listen to what happened and advise you to accept or not accept the offer at no charge.

You were wise not to jump at the offer. They may require you to waive your rights to any further damages by accepting their offer.
 
Dec 17, 2018
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#39
I'm actually curious about something...

Did your card EVER show a pending charge from ESA? Because if it DID, that means that ESA ran that card SOMEHOW. I have a VERY hard time believing that even a new employee could somehow have gotten all that information and given out a room key without keeping that information SOMEWHERE. Is ESA seriously suggesting that this employee looked at the 2 forms of ID and credit card and then did.... nothing with them? Just handed them back? They HAD to have run that card... well... actually, they DID run the card... for incidentals. They admitted that. That means ESA HAD THE CARD NUMBER STORED IN THE COMPUTER. Am I to believe that ESA wouldn't have been able to charge that card later if this hadn't been noticed that night? I would bet just about anything that ESA would've charged that card ASAP even if OP had already checked out and this was discovered later.

So anyone who claims that OP should have had to go downstairs to fix this is wrong in this case. Sorry. I'm usually ALL for being "cooperative" so as to not escalate things. But ESA HAD THAT CARD NUMBER. They ADMITTED they had it because they authorized it for incidentals. There was simply NO excuse for this.
 
Mar 15, 2018
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#40
Thank you very much. Once I saw that some were making it to be my fault , i did not feel like pursuing the discussion any further here. Just provide the necessary update. I have emailed them that three complimentary nights does not cut it for me. i am still in a lot of emotional distress especially from all that banging on the walls and doors when they barged in. On the other hand i am not sure what type of compensation i want out of this , so i have asked for up till the end of the week to think about it.
I am so so so sorry you felt that way. I can't speak for those who thought you should have done more than you did, or had any fault here whatsoever. I can only tell you that if I'd checked into my hotel, given them my card, gone to my room, gotten undressed and in bed, and someone came BARGING into my room without my permission, I'd be livid! And I would have called the police on THEM! How DARE they? What if I'd been lying naked on my bed? What if I'd been sitting on the toilet? The invasion of privacy just unforgivable.

And then to be treated the way you were by the police -- that's just so wrong. Please know you have my total sympathy.

As far as most of us were concerned, this was the fault of the hotel and we are right with you on this.

I still think you might want to run this by an Equal Rights Attorney. We aren’t attorneys nor can we make any type of legal assumptions but I’d like you to make sure your civil rights weren’t violated. Most will at least listen to what happened and advise you to accept or not accept the offer at no charge.

You were wise not to jump at the offer. They may require you to waive your rights to any further damages by accepting their offer.
I'm 100% with Neil on this. I do think you should talk to a civil rights attorney. Maybe reach out to the ACLU? Just a thought.

I'm actually curious about something...

Did your card EVER show a pending charge from ESA? Because if it DID, that means that ESA ran that card SOMEHOW. I have a VERY hard time believing that even a new employee could somehow have gotten all that information and given out a room key without keeping that information SOMEWHERE. Is ESA seriously suggesting that this employee looked at the 2 forms of ID and credit card and then did.... nothing with them? Just handed them back? They HAD to have run that card... well... actually, they DID run the card... for incidentals. They admitted that. That means ESA HAD THE CARD NUMBER STORED IN THE COMPUTER. Am I to believe that ESA wouldn't have been able to charge that card later if this hadn't been noticed that night? I would bet just about anything that ESA would've charged that card ASAP even if OP had already checked out and this was discovered later.

So anyone who claims that OP should have had to go downstairs to fix this is wrong in this case. Sorry. I'm usually ALL for being "cooperative" so as to not escalate things. But ESA HAD THAT CARD NUMBER. They ADMITTED they had it because they authorized it for incidentals. There was simply NO excuse for this.
BINGO!