Enterprise Billing 11k

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Jul 24, 2019
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#1
Hello,

I rented a car from the local airport from Enterprise on May 17 2019. I traveled from Texas to Louisiana. While traveling back to Texas on Tuesday May 21, 2019. A check engine light came on. I pulled over to a gas station in Louisiana. Coolant was everywhere. I had road side assistance with Enterprise they came to get the truck and towed. We had to pay for a Lyft to the local Enterprise. We were placed in a Van 4 hours later and make it to Texas.

The supervisor on site credited my account half of the bill $82 and provided a rental upgrade for the future. The next month on 6/12/19 I recieved a call stating I am responsible for the damages. I was not involved in an accident or hit anything. So it was disputed by phone. The dispute came back that I owe for damaged. I emailed the rep and asked for all items that was listed in this forum. No answer after a week. Now today I get an email from another claims rep asking fot my insurance information. The documents was not provided only the bill from the repair shop and the towing and labor fees. Enterprise had the car towed from Lake Charles to New Orleans for repair. Which is confusing. Now I havr a bill for 11k

The car was renter with a cc master card
Insurance : my personal Geico coverage

What should I do next?
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
2,128
2,379
113
Maui Hawaii
#2
Hello,

I rented a car from the local airport from Enterprise on May 17 2019. I traveled from Texas to Louisiana. While traveling back to Texas on Tuesday May 21, 2019. A check engine light came on. I pulled over to a gas station in Louisiana. Coolant was everywhere. I had road side assistance with Enterprise they came to get the truck and towed. We had to pay for a Lyft to the local Enterprise. We were placed in a Van 4 hours later and make it to Texas.

The supervisor on site credited my account half of the bill $82 and provided a rental upgrade for the future. The next month on 6/12/19 I received a call stating I am responsible for the damages. I was not involved in an accident or hit anything. So it was disputed by phone. The dispute came back that I owe for damaged. I emailed the rep and asked for all items that was listed in this forum. No answer after a week. Now today I get an email from another claims rep asking for my insurance information. The documents was not provided only the bill from the repair shop and the towing and labor fees. Enterprise had the car towed from Lake Charles to New Orleans for repair. Which is confusing. Now I have a bill for 11k

The car was renter with a cc master card
Insurance : my personal Geico coverage

What should I do next?
This is such a frequent occurrence that we have a standing post on the subject:

https://forum.elliott.org/threads/how-to-deal-with-a-car-rental-damage-claim.9703/#post-101817

Stop talking to anyone. Use email only. Follow the steps outlined above. Repeat that there was no accident or damage caused by yourself, but that the vehicle had a coolant leak that you could not have caused. You are not at fault for a radiator or hose leaking. Again request all the needed paperwork by email.

Do not provide your insurance information as they will then try to get your policy to pay; plus the claim may not be covered by your insurance (or your CC).

You will need to escalate this to Enterprise corporate. It may take weeks or months to resolve but do not give up and pay them.
https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/enterprise/

https://forum.elliott.org/threads/resolving-consumer-complaints-and-developing-a-paper-trail.8903/
 
Jul 24, 2019
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#3
Hello,

I reached out to the care email. They redirected to speak with claims. I reached out to claim for the additional documentation.She sent the informatiom along with another customer information attached to it (smh). I explained I could be contacted only via email and I want to speak with her supervisor. It has been over 5 business days with no contact from the manager. I reached back out to the claims rep and advised I want the CEO information. She sent a final notice via email and now is asking if I would like to dispute it again? I am getting ran in circles
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#5
You said: "A check engine light came on. I pulled over to a gas station in Louisiana."
One question I foresee that you will need to address is the time/distance between the check engine light and the station. That will be critical in assessing who is responsible . . .
 
Sep 12, 2018
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#6
It seems like this sort of failure should be covered by the manufacturer’s warranty. Every car I’ve ever rented from enterprise has been new enough to still be under coverage. The only exception I can see is if the renter hit some sort of road debris that damaged something. But if that’s the case, it should be easy enough for enterprise to provide documentation of that fact, at which point an insurance claim may be the way to go. Also, are you sure it was the check engine light? Coolant overheating or loss typically triggers a different warning, and those require much more immediate action to avoid damage.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#7
It seems like this sort of failure should be covered by the manufacturer’s warranty. Every car I’ve ever rented from enterprise has been new enough to still be under coverage. The only exception I can see is if the renter hit some sort of road debris that damaged something. But if that’s the case, it should be easy enough for enterprise to provide documentation of that fact, at which point an insurance claim may be the way to go. Also, are you sure it was the check engine light? Coolant overheating or loss typically triggers a different warning, and those require much more immediate action to avoid damage.
Typically for a check engine light, the driver pulls over immediately to inspect. If that cannot be done safely, 1 mile farther would be the max in my opinion.

But if Jay85 drove another 5 miles or more, Enterprise may reasonably conclude that the renter is responsible for the damage which could likely have been avoided by an immediate and prudent stop . . .
 
Sep 12, 2018
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#8
Typically for a check engine light, the driver pulls over immediately to inspect. If that cannot be done safely, 1 mile farther would be the max in my opinion.

But if Jay85 drove another 5 miles or more, Enterprise may reasonably conclude that the renter is responsible for the damage which could likely have been avoided by an immediate and prudent stop . . .
I’m open to being educated, so let me know if I have this wrong. The check engine light is part of a federally mandated system that monitors emissions-related equipment and performance. Low oil, for instance, does not trigger it. Neither does coolant level or temperature. There may be other warning lights triggered by those events. Depending on the car, there may not. The OP doesn’t say what kind of car this was, but here’s what my own 2018 Ford’s manual says about the check engine light:

“If it illuminates when the engine is running this indicates a malfunction. The On Board Diagnostics system has detected a malfunction of the vehicle emission control system.
If it flashes, engine misfire may be occurring. Increased exhaust gas temperatures could damage the catalytic converter or other vehicle components. Drive in a moderate fashion (avoid heavy acceleration and deceleration) and have your vehicle immediately serviced.”

I think stopping at the next gas station and calling for a tow falls in line with this, even if that were several miles down the road.
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
2,128
2,379
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Maui Hawaii
#9
I’m open to being educated, so let me know if I have this wrong. The check engine light is part of a federally mandated system that monitors emissions-related equipment and performance. Low oil, for instance, does not trigger it. Neither does coolant level or temperature. There may be other warning lights triggered by those events. Depending on the car, there may not. The OP doesn’t say what kind of car this was, but here’s what my own 2018 Ford’s manual says about the check engine light:

“If it illuminates when the engine is running this indicates a malfunction. The On Board Diagnostics system has detected a malfunction of the vehicle emission control system.
If it flashes, engine misfire may be occurring. Increased exhaust gas temperatures could damage the catalytic converter or other vehicle components. Drive in a moderate fashion (avoid heavy acceleration and deceleration) and have your vehicle immediately serviced.”

I think stopping at the next gas station and calling for a tow falls in line with this, even if that were several miles down the road.
You are correct. Check engine light means check the engine at a service facility, not STOP NOW. And who could stop their car in the middle of nowhere and "check engine", which requires sophisticated electronic monitoring equipment,
 
Jul 24, 2019
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#10
It seems like this sort of failure should be covered by the manufacturer’s warranty. Every car I’ve ever rented from enterprise has been new enough to still be under coverage. The only exception I can see is if the renter hit some sort of road debris that damaged something. But if that’s the case, it should be easy enough for enterprise to provide documentation of that fact, at which point an insurance claim may be the way to go. Also, are you sure it was the check engine light? Coolant overheating or loss typically triggers a different warning, and those require much more immediate action to avoid damage.
Hi,

Correction,

The message that displayed on the dash board was " engine overheating" or something of that sort.
 
Jul 24, 2019
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#11
You are correct. Check engine light means check the engine at a service facility, not STOP NOW. And who could stop their car in the middle of nowhere and "check engine", which requires sophisticated electronic monitoring equipment,
Correction, the dash said Engine over heating or service Engine. Something of that sort. We were on an incline up the bridge and as soon as we made it over we stopped at the first gas station.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#12
From Consumer Reports:

"Look for a serious problem that requires immediate attention. Check your dashboard gauges and lights for indications of low oil pressure or overheating. These conditions mean you should pull over and shut off the engine as soon as you can find a safe place to do so. On some cars, a yellow check engine light means investigate the problem and a red one means stop right now."​
So, as a precaution, yes, pull over as soon as it is convenient. That our guest says "coolant was everywhere" means there was likely serious overheating that may have been (please notice that I said "may") prevented by an immediate stop.

Who would stop "in the middle of nowhere"? I would, as I once drove a short distance "after", and ruined an engine. Ever since, I stop as-soon-as-is-safe to investigate. It may not need urgent attention, but then again . . .

Note: please understand that I am not intending to stir up controversy here.
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
2,128
2,379
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Maui Hawaii
#13
"The message that displayed on the dash board was " engine overheating" or something of that sort. "
This COMPLETELY changes the recommendations. "Engine overheating" and "check engine" are entirely different messages. One is an advisory (check engine); the other (engine overheating) means pull over as soon as it is safe to do so and turn off the engine. If you continue to drive with the "engine overheating" indicator, you may destroy the engine.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#14
"The message that displayed on the dash board was " engine overheating" or something of that sort. "
This COMPLETELY changes the recommendations. "Engine overheating" and "check engine" are entirely different messages. One is an advisory (check engine); the other (engine overheating) means pull over as soon as it is safe to do so and turn off the engine. If you continue to drive with the "engine overheating" indicator, you may destroy the engine.
I agree weihlac. Somehow I missed the correction. It does seem that you stopped as soon as it was safe to do so . . .
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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San Francisco
#15
If I were driving a vehicle that showed an 'engine overheating' light, I would pull over and stop immediately, raise the hood and call AAA. I'm sure none of the other drivers would appreciate this action, but overheating is how an engine is ruined. These idiot lights are just that ... I'd never buy a vehicle that didn't have gauges. When it comes to a rental, you don't have much choice, so you just have to stop driving.
 
Mar 18, 2019
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#16
That's one of the big reasons why I bought these two devices for my wife and I:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B078K54MT5/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005NLQAHS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

There are lots of different models so you don't have to buy those specific ones or from that vendor, but I take them with me everywhere I go. The second the check engine light comes on I pull over, whip that out and make sure I understand exactly what is wrong with the car and whether or not continuing to drive is safe and will not cause further damage.
 
Likes: VoR61
Feb 3, 2019
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#17
Correction, the dash said Engine over heating or service Engine. Something of that sort. We were on an incline up the bridge and as soon as we made it over we stopped at the first gas station.
So it sounds like it was actually the engine temperature warning light that came on, and there was probably a dinging sound, too. That's an absolute emergency alert - the engine is overheating, and you need to pull over and get it cooled down as soon as you can do so safely, not as soon as it's convenient.

Driving on an overheated engine can cause severe - and very expensive - damage. You haven't specified what repairs you're being charged for. Was it the engine, or something else? Unfortunately, even if the engine overheated because of a fault you didn't cause, you might be held liable for the damage because you continued to drive it in that condition.

How far from the end of the bridge was the gas station? Was there anywhere else - even a shoulder - where you could have pulled over safely? Of course you couldn't have stopped safely on the bridge itself, and if the distance between the first safe stopping place and the gas station was minimal, you may have a stronger argument in your defense.
 
Nov 20, 2015
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#18
In support of the OP, the notorious Interstate-10 Calcasieu River bridge in Lake Charles is very steep with no shoulders and low railing; so, pulling over would not have been possible. Blocking one of only 2 available lanes on the incline would be dangerous. I have traveled this route many times going to Houston. I believe there is a gas station just to the west of the bridge.
 

Carrie Livingston

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Jan 6, 2015
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#19
If I were driving a vehicle that showed an 'engine overheating' light, I would pull over and stop immediately, raise the hood and call AAA. I'm sure none of the other drivers would appreciate this action, but overheating is how an engine is ruined. These idiot lights are just that ... I'd never buy a vehicle that didn't have gauges. When it comes to a rental, you don't have much choice, so you just have to stop driving.
My car now doesn't have the temperature gauge like they used to. There's a light that is blue when I turn the car on to indicate the car hasn't warmed up. I would assume that same light would turn yellow or orange when the car starts getting warmer.
 
Likes: VoR61

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
8,539
8,754
113
San Francisco
#20
My car now doesn't have the temperature gauge like they used to. There's a light that is blue when I turn the car on to indicate the car hasn't warmed up. I would assume that same light would turn yellow or orange when the car starts getting warmer.
As far as I know, those lights come on when you start the car ... and they are telling you that the light works. The whole concept of no gauges is nuts. By the time a light changes color (if it ever does) your engine is probably fried.