Does AirBnB Have an Initial for Heat?

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What should an AirBnB "host" disclose in a listing?


  • Total voters
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Feb 19, 2015
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#1
Not sure how much, or even if, a refund is merited from AirBnB, but surely expected it to confrm if the following is customary:
Over three late September nights in chilly Edinburgh, we had heat only for two hours. (Our "host" had texted entry instructions only hours before arrival when we had no internet or phone access. No one there. Neighbors said our entry issue was not unique.)
The heat, a welcome sheet said, was controlled by the building. Nor can we blame her for the drunken courtyard party, under windows that would not close, that ended at 2 a.m. We do wonder, though, if AirBnB considers provision of heat, normally required under US law, as a requirement for its putative hosts.
Additionally, the rooms were under lit with some 16w candelabra bulbs, and our request for a sink bulb replacement was ignored.
Is the second 'B' for Broken -- the refrigerator? Directed upon inquiry to a freezer on low.
For less money, we could been coddled in heat at a boutique hotel opposite. (We ate and warmed there.)
As for timely help, email sent using the Elliott e-mail listing bounced (an attempt to create a paper trail), no chat, and the UK help phone exchange was blocked by Vonage. Frankly, we decided the Wookie always would win, but the memory rankles. And Twitter tweets from the first have echoed, deflected and evasive, for days.
We spent our time inside under a cozy comforter. That was small comfort but instructive on AirBnB.
 
Last edited:
Mar 17, 2015
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#2
First, you cannot apply US laws to any other country. What is required here may not be required elsewhere. Second, you booked the AirBnB, so unless the booking information was misleading, then I am not sure you have any recourse. Did you happen to inform your host that you would be out of communication for times during your stay and ask for the information to be sent to you early? In this day and age, most people do not think about being out of internet or cell reception.

I think one issue is the windows not closing, if they would truly not close. I do not think you have a great case for partial reimbursement. But, you can always ask due to the windows and the bulb. However, this may be a paltry amount of recompense.

Did you put in a request using the link and state that the current AirBnB contact info is wrong.

Also, if you do write, leave out anything that the renter does not control, like the party, nothing he/she can do about that.
 
Jul 13, 2016
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#3
That's the problem with Airbnb's. You cannot control the levels of safety, comfort, cleanliness, or even legality of a rental. Owners lie, exaggerate, or obfuscate on their listings. I think you can try for a partial adjustment, but frankly don't hold out much hope for you.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#4
I do not think there is a mandatory minimum temperature in Scotland.

Have you stayed in a private residence in Scotland before? The coldest I have ever been indoors was in an apartment in Scotland. It was with owned by a relative who was there with me. I was cold the entire time, relative was not.

Even the Scottish cows are extra wooly (ie Highland Cattle) because of the weather.

Different places, different standards. If one wants a place geared to foreigners, then a hotel is the best option. It sounds like you did live like a local...
 
Jul 13, 2016
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#5
I was in Edinburgh one August day that was so cold that I went back to my heatless B&B and had a hot shower. Many Scottish B&B's don't turn on the heat until mid to late September.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#7
I just looked at the laws where I live and the minimum heat requirements in NYC and the law is only applicable between October 1 and May 31.

So the entire question about “US law” is really not relevant — as different cities have different laws.

There are no laws in Sweden (north and cold) but generally accepted that below 65 degrees in winter (ie 5 months of the year) would be grounds to complain.
 
Likes: danchurch
Feb 19, 2015
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#8
First, you cannot apply US laws to any other country. What is required here may not be required elsewhere. Second, you booked the AirBnB, so unless the booking information was misleading, then I am not sure you have any recourse. Did you happen to inform your host that you would be out of communication for times during your stay and ask for the information to be sent to you early? In this day and age, most people do not think about being out of internet or cell reception.

I think one issue is the windows not closing, if they would truly not close. I do not think you have a great case for partial reimbursement. But, you can always ask due to the windows and the bulb. However, this may be a paltry amount of recompense.

Did you put in a request using the link and state that the current AirBnB contact info is wrong.

Also, if you do write, leave out anything that the renter does not control, like the party, nothing he/she can do about that.
I did not cite US law as remotely probative. Nor, admittedly, did I contact equivalent regulators in Edinburgh. The reference merely suggested that some standards were common elsewhere where I am, in fact, a landlord. Apologies for any confusion.
 
Feb 19, 2015
15
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#9
That's the problem with Airbnb's. You cannot control the levels of safety, comfort, cleanliness, or even legality of a rental. Owners lie, exaggerate, or obfuscate on their listings. I think you can try for a partial adjustment, but frankly don't hold out much hope for you.
I have found my CC issuers remarkably fair. The issue might rest on whether my cited circumstances for not using their telephone help would stand up. Seems that an increasing number of companies channel all contact through social media.