Dispute w/Chase Resolved in Favor of Hotels.com - - Fair?

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Jan 6, 2015
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#41
With regard to social media, I would urge caution on your daughter's part. Her anger is certainly understandable, but once the "shaming" begins, the dominoes also begin to fall and could result in future booking difficulties (not just with Hotels/Expedia). Businesses read social media and can take note of negative reviews and "ban" customers. It is a high risk move.

I would do what Neil suggests. You may resolve this yet to your satisfaction, without the stigma associated with social media attacks. Just my thoughts ...
 
Dec 19, 2017
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#42
Thank you VoR61 for your thoughts. Your comments actually made me laugh, which is always a good thing.

I should have moderated my statement about my daughter's comments on social media. She is not going to engage in any sort of 'flame war' with Expedia. Although she certainly will express our experience and how it was resolved. Ironically, she works at a 5 star resort, her second job out of college, (yes, I am that proud mom) where, among her many duties as A.M. is to actually CATER to the clientele. She is not really "angry" about what happened to us during the storm. Rather, she is just incredulous that this lack of basic consideration, especially under the extreme circumstances, is the corporation's business practices. In her own words, "we are never permitted to say 'no' to a guest at ______; if I can't provide the service/request, I find someone who can."

I don't remember who on this forum said it but I will repeat it: no more booking apps. I will deal with the hotel, preferably the actual property, going forward. I'm sure to have a more positive experience.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Jan 6, 2015
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#43
I agree about booking directly with hotels, but I have seen a fair share of issues with certain properties presented here. Certainly, the fewer entities to which we cede control the better our chances of satisfactory resolution when problems arise.

One tip, though, if you book directly with a property. If you have to call to do so, be sure to ask what they are going to do with your credit card number. I found some that write it on a sticky note or sheet of paper for entry in the "computer" later. This means that your credit card information is sitting around for anyone to see/steal. I always insist they enter directly into the computer. For that reason, I always book online if possible, and double check each screen before proceeding.

And some properties will also print your entire credit card number on their copy. We won't stay at those. All of this bears watching ...
 
Likes: Lorraine Daly
Dec 19, 2017
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#44
An excellent point! The majority of hospitality employees are honest and wouldn't consider committing a felony, but it's always prudent to take basic precautions. Thank you VoR61!
 
#45
I agree about booking directly with hotels, but I have seen a fair share of issues with certain properties presented here. Certainly, the fewer entities to which we cede control the better our chances of satisfactory resolution when problems arise.

One tip, though, if you book directly with a property. If you have to call to do so, be sure to ask what they are going to do with your credit card number. I found some that write it on a sticky note or sheet of paper for entry in the "computer" later. This means that your credit card information is sitting around for anyone to see/steal. I always insist they enter directly into the computer. For that reason, I always book online if possible, and double check each screen before proceeding.

And some properties will also print your entire credit card number on their copy. We won't stay at those. All of this bears watching ...
I always download the hotel chain's app to my phone and book through the app. This is especially effective when on a road trip with no exact destination picked out for the night. All the hotel usually sees are the last four digits of your credit card at the time of booking but you may have to present the physical card at check-in.
 

Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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www.promalvacations.com
#48
That would protect you while booking, but not if they print receipts and their copy has the entire cc number. Vigilance is always necessary ...
Also be aware that many hotels no longer allow same day cancellations. Many are moving to canceling 48-72 hours before arrival so last minute road trip bookings might put you in that penalty as soon as you book.
 
Likes: VoR61
Jan 6, 2015
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#49
Great point Neil. We now selectively will wait to book a hotel (depending on need and time of year). Starting about 2 months away (if possible/practical), we call the hotel to see how many rooms are available with the size bed we require for xxx date. While this approach has its own risks, we offset that by identifying a second hotel in case.

This has the added advantage of not tracking and managing a reservation (calls to confirm they still show it, printing a copy to take along, etc.). We plan to do this for an upcoming trip this year (?).

Of course, this will not work for certain busy dates or if a specific property is desired.