Dell refuses to repair damage done in their repair depot

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Mar 23, 2019
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#21
And do NOT threaten a lawsuit or small
claims court- once you do that they will stop communication with you.

Once you threaten small claims court, you need to actually file a claim because you’ve already given them notice and their legal departments will tell them not to respond because anything they say can incriminate the case.
I guess that's why I'm here. They effectively shut down communication LONG before it got to this point (I'd say after the 2nd phone call in January). Every response has been cut-and-paste, with no offer of help or resolution.
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
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#22
Use the company contacts, emailing one per week, starting at the first level you have not previously contacted. Escalate weekly if no/negative response.
https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/dell/

Propose a reasonable solution. I would ask for an exchange of the 2 X 8GB DIMMS for one Dell 16 GB DIMM but you need to decide what you are willing to settle for.
 
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weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
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#23
Yes. I didn't replace anything. I added memory (and a hard drive, but that's irrelevant here).
This sentence is in itself contradictory. You apparently did replace the hard drive as well as add memory. You will need to be very precise in outlining your case for appeal and not open any loopholes as your above sentence does. If the computer works in its delivered config, Dell has the upper hand and you need to give them a good reason to help you.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Mar 23, 2019
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#24
While OP says one of the reps claimed this, Dell has been supporting the computer in the factory-shipped configuration. This configuration appears to work fine and pass all diagnostics. The failure only occurs when the OP adds his memory.
Point of clarification: Any DIMM inserted into DIMM slot B causes crashing. I can simply move the factory installed DIMM from slot A to slot B, and the system will crash. It doesn't have to be the aftermarket memory to have the issues arise.
 
Mar 23, 2019
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#25
This sentence is in itself contradictory. You apparently did replace the hard drive as well as add memory. You will need to be very precise in outlining your case for appeal and not open any loopholes as your above sentence does. If the computer works in its delivered config, Dell has the upper hand and you need to give them a good reason to help you.
The system shipped with only a 256GB SSD. The hard drive was an addition, not a replacement. The memory was an addition, not a replacement.
 
Likes: VoR61
Jan 6, 2015
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#26
Terry: in Post #12 you said "It's a you-broke-it, you-fix-it claim. The damage occurred while performing warranty repairs." You are saying they broke your laptop.

And you have not indicated here that a full, independent diagnostic was performed before you first sent it to Dell. So, if you take this to court, you will be asked for some proof that it worked beforehand . . .
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Mar 23, 2019
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#27
Terry: in Post #12 you said "It's a you-broke-it, you-fix-it claim. The damage occurred while performing warranty repairs." You are saying they broke your laptop.

And you have not indicated here that a full, independent diagnostic was performed before you first sent it to Dell. So, if you take this to court, you will be asked for some proof that it worked beforehand . . .
So what I'm hearing is the fact that I was able to run 16GB memory in a 2x8GB configuration in my laptop for 9 months (I have the receipt for the purchase of the memory from Dell), without reporting any issues to this effect until after Dell replaced my keyboard (which, incidentally, requires the removal of the motherboard in my laptop) is insufficient.

I would counter that it's unreasonable to expect one to have any kind of diagnostics or tests run on a perfectly functioning PC to support any possible future claims that may or may not happen. I'm fairly certain this isn't a common practice. If it is, I've been doing it wrong.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#28
There is no accusation in my responses Terry. My goal was and is to advise you to bear in mind as you appeal this process that your word is all you have that indicates proper functioning of the laptop prior to Dell's receipt of same. If you state that they "broke it", you are in a precarious position.

You may think I'm being overly cautious about that, and if so, proceed with your assertion (as worded in post #12). But my instincts of 40 years as a technologist are being applied here. When customers said that I broke something, my immediate thought is "was it broken before I received it".

And since they only replaced the keyboard, their response could be (and it sounds like it already is) that the second time they received it the diagnostics they ran showed a problem with the memory card/slot. Thye would not have touched the motherboard except to remove/reinsert the keyboard connector. As they likely did not run a full PC diag the first time, this could go "round and round". And no, I would not expect you to run a test "in case".

Simply said, be careful how you articulate the events. State that there were no crashes before you send it the first time, but when it came back there were. Leave it to the executives to make of that what they will (i.e., did Dell do "something" wrong) . . .
 
Mar 15, 2018
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#29
I don't know why others are having trouble following this - it all made perfect sense to me. I feel your frustration. I agree that Dell has behaved terribly and wrongly.

It doesn't matter that it was functioning fine before he sent it in. The computer is still under warranty, right? Then they need to FIX it. Or replace it.

Unfortunately I don't have any advice, other than to do your best to keep your email to Dell as short as possible. I'd suggest cutting out some of the details of what happened, and focus only on what's most important: a) your laptop isn't working, b) adding memory does NOT void the warranty, c) it's under warranty and therefore they are required by the terms of that warranty to fix it or replace it.

Once you get a resolution, I would then be sure to send up the chain more details of the terrible treatment you received from certain customer service people - but that's for later. For now, you just want a working laptop, which you are absolutely entitled to under the terms of your warranty.

Good luck!
 
Likes: Warren
Feb 28, 2019
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#30
I know its a "nuclear" option but have tried reformatting/restoring the hard drive? Updating the BIOS? Also, before you upgrade to 16MB, make sure that the slot can handle the extra memory...sometimes they are limited to how much memory can be installed into it.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Mar 23, 2019
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#31
I'd just like to say that I really appreciate everyone taking the time to try to understand and respond to my issue. I value and am seriously considering your feedback before I take further action.

I concede the easy thing would be for me to spend $100 for a single stick of memory and be done - trust me, I've considered it - but I'm not entirely convinced it's the right thing to do. If everyone did the easy thing, this website wouldn't be necessary, I think.
There is no accusation in my responses Terry. My goal was and is to advise you to bear in mind as you appeal this process that your word is all you have that indicates proper functioning of the laptop prior to Dell's receipt of same. If you state that they "broke it", you are in a precarious position.

You may think I'm being overly cautious about that, and if so, proceed with your assertion (as worded in post #12). But my instincts of 40 years as a technologist are being applied here. When customers said that I broke something, my immediate thought is "was it broken before I received it".

And since they only replaced the keyboard, their response could be (and it sounds like it already is) that the second time they received it the diagnostics they ran showed a problem with the memory card/slot. Thye would not have touched the motherboard except to remove/reinsert the keyboard connector. As they likely did not run a full PC diag the first time, this could go "round and round". And no, I would not expect you to run a test "in case".

Simply said, be careful how you articulate the events. State that there were no crashes before you send it the first time, but when it came back there were. Leave it to the executives to make of that what they will (i.e., did Dell do "something" wrong) . . .
I truly appreciate your responses, as they give me the opportunity to think things through that I otherwise may not have. I used the you-broke-it-you-fix-it reference for brevity in this forum. I never thought you were accusing me of anything. I welcome any advice.
 
Mar 15, 2018
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#32
Point of clarification: Any DIMM inserted into DIMM slot B causes crashing. I can simply move the factory installed DIMM from slot A to slot B, and the system will crash. It doesn't have to be the aftermarket memory to have the issues arise.
Just to clarify my earlier comment - I predicated that on this comment by the OP, and by his earlier comment that he confirmed that adding memory into DIMM slot B does NOT void the warranty.

If he bought a brand new computer, and one of the features is that it has a B-slot for adding memory, then adding memory to that slot should not cause the computer to crash. So regardless of when/where the problem arose, this is something that should be covered by warranty, IMO.
 
Mar 23, 2019
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#33
I know its a "nuclear" option but have tried reformatting/restoring the hard drive? Updating the BIOS? Also, before you upgrade to 16MB, make sure that the slot can handle the extra memory...sometimes they are limited to how much memory can be installed into it.
The PC repair shop updated the BIOS, and tested my system with an SSD that had a clean installation of Windows on it. Dell reinstalled the OS when they replaced my keyboard. I had only reinstalled a few of the programs I'd previously installed.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#34
I don't know why others are having trouble following this - it all made perfect sense to me. I feel your frustration. I agree that Dell has behaved terribly and wrongly.

It doesn't matter that it was functioning fine before he sent it in. The computer is still under warranty, right? Then they need to FIX it. Or replace it.

Unfortunately I don't have any advice, other than to do your best to keep your email to Dell as short as possible. I'd suggest cutting out some of the details of what happened, and focus only on what's most important: a) your laptop isn't working, b) adding memory does NOT void the warranty, c) it's under warranty and therefore they are required by the terms of that warranty to fix it or replace it.

Once you get a resolution, I would then be sure to send up the chain more details of the terrible treatment you received from certain customer service people - but that's for later. For now, you just want a working laptop, which you are absolutely entitled to under the terms of your warranty.

Good luck!
I too, feel Dell support has not acted correctly. And I believe Terry's accounting of the events. Every . . . single . . . word.

However, whenever anyone begins an appeal to the executive level, caution is imperative. Insults threats, and unproven accusations are off-putting and make sink the ship before it ever sails. To me the Reader's Digest version is this:
  • Lifetime warranty
  • PC goes in for repair, comes out with major issue. Who or what (at Dell) may be responsible is unknown.
  • Request for warranty repair of 2nd issue is denied. Blamed on 3rd party memory chip, which is refuted by independent test.
  • Dell rejects 3rd party test and stands by memory chip as cause
Thus, as Joe Friday use to always say "Just the facts Ma'am. Just the facts" . . .
 
Mar 23, 2019
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#35
And since they only replaced the keyboard, their response could be (and it sounds like it already is) that the second time they received it the diagnostics they ran showed a problem with the memory card/slot. Thye would not have touched the motherboard except to remove/reinsert the keyboard connector. As they likely did not run a full PC diag the first time, this could go "round and round". And no, I would not expect you to run a test "in case".
Speaking to this point explicitly, Dell's Repair Depot includes, with the repaired unit, a piece of paper outlining the repairs that were done. This form letter includes the following text:

"After all repairs were completed, your system passed comprehensive hardware tests to ensure proper functionality. The final test performed included the following parts: processor, memory, hard disk, microphone, touch pad, lid, battery, AC adapter, camera, speaker and touchscreen"

So, according to this, Dell runs their diagnostic tool every time. Presumably, when they ran it the second time, they found the issue, and fixed it by removing the memory. They didn't question me when I reported the crashing issue the first time.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#36
Added note as a tech: If I had received this "back" (and worked for Dell) I would have first tested the PC with two Dell DIMMs installed, one in each slot, Often times slot A must be populated first for the PC to work. That way one knows for sure that the motherboard is not defective. Removing the aftre market DIMM from slot B is not sufficient, nor is moving the original from slot A to slot B . . .
 
Likes: Terry_L
Jan 6, 2015
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#37
Speaking to this point explicitly, Dell's Repair Depot includes, with the repaired unit, a piece of paper outlining the repairs that were done. This form letter includes the following text:

"After all repairs were completed, your system passed comprehensive hardware tests to ensure proper functionality. The final test performed included the following parts: processor, memory, hard disk, microphone, touch pad, lid, battery, AC adapter, camera, speaker and touchscreen"

So, according to this, Dell runs their diagnostic tool every time. Presumably, when they ran it the second time, they found the issue, and fixed it by removing the memory. They didn't question me when I reported the crashing issue the first time.
Then make sure to say that in your appeal . . .
 
Likes: Terry_L
Mar 15, 2018
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#38
I too, feel Dell support has not acted correctly. And I believe Terry's accounting of the events. Every . . . single . . . word.

However, whenever anyone begins an appeal to the executive level, caution is imperative. Insults threats, and unproven accusations are off-putting and make sink the ship before it ever sails. To me the Reader's Digest version is this:
  • Lifetime warranty
  • PC goes in for repair, comes out with major issue. Who or what (at Dell) may be responsible is unknown.
  • Request for warranty repair of 2nd issue is denied. Blamed on 3rd party memory chip, which is refuted by independent test.
  • Dell rejects 3rd party test and stands by memory chip as cause
Thus, as Joe Friday use to always say "Just the facts Ma'am. Just the facts" . . .
Agreed!

Especially the part about how to communicate this going forward. Leave out all the extraneous details, and focus ONLY on the fact that this computer is under warranty, and isn't working correctly. And be sure to provide the necessary details about what exactly isn't working, and how to replicate the problem. AND include the confirmation that plugging additional memory into the B-slot is an available feature that doesn't void the warranty, but isn't working.

Leave out any blame...doesn't matter. It's not working.
 
Likes: Terry_L

Neil Maley

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#39
Why did you buy a computer with so little memory? If you are using it for gaming, 8gb is really not enough.

Please use our company contacts for Dell and write to the first executive using the information here on how to create a paper trail. Their Customer Service is obviously going around in a circle and it’s probabky time to get an executive involved before the warranty runs out.

https://forum.elliott.org/threads/resolving-consumer-complaints-and-developing-a-paper-trail.8903/

Write to the first executive listed, give him a week to reply and repeat if necessary weekly.

https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/dell/
 
Likes: Terry_L
Mar 23, 2019
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#40
Why did you buy a computer with so little memory? If you are using it for gaming, 8gb is really not enough.

Please use our company contacts for Dell and write to the first executive using the information here on how to create a paper trail. Their Customer Service is obviously going around in a circle and it’s probabky time to get an executive involved before the warranty runs out.

https://forum.elliott.org/threads/resolving-consumer-complaints-and-developing-a-paper-trail.8903/

Write to the first executive listed, give him a week to reply and repeat if necessary weekly.

https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/dell/
Frankly, this system was in my price range, and configuring it with 16GB memory was not an option at the time of purchase - I tried. It was well reviewed. Regardless, ddding additional memory is a common practice, and should have been a non-issue - and wasn't a problem until my system came back from Dell's repair depot. It did everything I wanted it to do really well until then, and I was a happy camper.

Funny, but Dell offered me a good deal on an extended warranty about 3 weeks before this mess, so I bought it.

At the end of the day, the hardest part for me is distilling 3 months of frustration down into a non-accusatory, concise list of issues and requests.

What Dell needs to understand is that repeatedly and summarily dismissing their customers' claims that something is wrong is not good customer support. It's not even good (or smart) business. At the end of this, whatever the outcome, it will have cost Dell considerably more to settle this issue than if they simply did the right thing in the first place.

Again, thanks for your help.