CSAA Auto Insurance Stonewalling Longtime Customer

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Sep 22, 2014
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Staff member at CSAA auto insurance advised my claim should be no fault-medical; I had innocently (and stupidly) said it was my fault, but I eventually realized otherwise and my longtime physician and UCSF prof confirmed. Contacted appropriate agent with MD letter and cover email several times, then her supervisor. Was told about 10 weeks ago to be patient, but accident was 3-28-19. Our insurance is due to rise because of this in 2020. They're blowing me off.
 
Apr 3, 2016
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You have two options:

Request our researcher see if he can obtain contacts:
https://www.elliott.org/research/

Or file a complaint with your State Insurance Dept.
If you decide to go through the State Ins. Dept., it can really only be to speed up the decision. The company has done nothing wrong otherwise. And remember, they might not decide in your favor. You are the one who said you were at fault and your post seems to indicate that it took you awhile to decide you were not at fault. How long in-between the accident and your change of mind to not-at-fault? That could be a major factor in the insurance company taking longer. In my state (I do not know about yours), if the pro-insured decision comes after the new increased bill, the amount would be adjusted lower and refunded to me. The other option you would have is to shop around and get rates with other insurance companies to see if one would be lower no matter what the decision from CSAA.
 
Jun 12, 2019
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#4
Staff member at CSAA auto insurance advised my claim should be no fault-medical; I had innocently (and stupidly) said it was my fault, but I eventually realized otherwise and my longtime physician and UCSF prof confirmed. Contacted appropriate agent with MD letter and cover email several times, then her supervisor. Was told about 10 weeks ago to be patient, but accident was 3-28-19. Our insurance is due to rise because of this in 2020. They're blowing me off.
When you say no fault medical, are you referring the medical pay? That normally does not affect your rates. What did happen in the accident?
 
Sep 22, 2014
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When you say no fault medical, are you referring the medical pay? That normally does not affect your rates. What did happen in the accident?
It took me a few days to realize what had actually happened; I mentioned it during one of numerous phone conversations with several different CSAA staff members. She immediately replied that should be no fault; get a letter from your doctor. I did but I would have to go back through my files to find dates. I was told insurance rate would not rise till next year (2020) before that.
The accident happened like this: I was poised to pull out of parking space about 5 pm; took really long for a break in traffic, since it was coming in from both the street I was on and the one that crossed it. My head was turned as I watched. Don't, of course, know how long, but through several light changes. Suddenly "came to" heading straight toward truck parked across from me. Hit brake, hit driver door of truck. Airbags didn't release. 10,000 damage to my car; no idea what it was to truck. Realized I had managed to cut off circulation for a split second, likely seat belt against neck in my turned around position. MD agreed. No previous or subsequent events. Hope that answers your question.
 
Likes: calihankl
Apr 3, 2016
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It took me a few days to realize what had actually happened; I mentioned it during one of numerous phone conversations with several different CSAA staff members. She immediately replied that should be no fault; get a letter from your doctor. I did but I would have to go back through my files to find dates. I was told insurance rate would not rise till next year (2020) before that.
The accident happened like this: I was poised to pull out of parking space about 5 pm; took really long for a break in traffic, since it was coming in from both the street I was on and the one that crossed it. My head was turned as I watched. Don't, of course, know how long, but through several light changes. Suddenly "came to" heading straight toward truck parked across from me. Hit brake, hit driver door of truck. Airbags didn't release. 10,000 damage to my car; no idea what it was to truck. Realized I had managed to cut off circulation for a split second, likely seat belt against neck in my turned around position. MD agreed. No previous or subsequent events. Hope that answers your question.
Wow. That puts a whole new twist in things. This is probably very complicated in the eyes of the insurance company. I would not be surprised if they make you see a independent doctor. If I were you, I would just pay the higher premium and let the insurance company investigate further.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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#7
I'm glad you are OK and no subsequent events. To the extent your insurer paid a collision claim for your car or for the truck, it may well regard this as an "at-fault" accident.
 
Likes: calihankl
Jun 12, 2019
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#8
It took me a few days to realize what had actually happened; I mentioned it during one of numerous phone conversations with several different CSAA staff members. She immediately replied that should be no fault; get a letter from your doctor. I did but I would have to go back through my files to find dates. I was told insurance rate would not rise till next year (2020) before that.
The accident happened like this: I was poised to pull out of parking space about 5 pm; took really long for a break in traffic, since it was coming in from both the street I was on and the one that crossed it. My head was turned as I watched. Don't, of course, know how long, but through several light changes. Suddenly "came to" heading straight toward truck parked across from me. Hit brake, hit driver door of truck. Airbags didn't release. 10,000 damage to my car; no idea what it was to truck. Realized I had managed to cut off circulation for a split second, likely seat belt against neck in my turned around position. MD agreed. No previous or subsequent events. Hope that answers your question.
When I was training as an adjuster, they went over this similar scenario and asked us who was at fault. A person is driving and has a sudden heart attack and causes an accident. The person appeared to be healthy and has been getting a physical every year with a clean bill of health. Is the person at fault? We were told that there was no negligence because it was not foreseeable. This was considered an act of God. I always wondered if this defense would work in the real world but it would require extensive documentation to prove it was not foreseeable to deny liability. You said you hit a truck, so now it up to your insurance company to prove to the other party that you did nothing wrong. Here is a little more information on that defense:
https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/car-accidents-caused-medical-emergency.html

Do you know if they paid the other party? Was it just property damage or was someone else hurt? Fault would of had to be determined before they would pay out.
 
Likes: VoR61
Sep 22, 2014
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When I was training as an adjuster, they went over this similar scenario and asked us who was at fault. A person is driving and has a sudden heart attack and causes an accident. The person appeared to be healthy and has been getting a physical every year with a clean bill of health. Is the person at fault? We were told that there was no negligence because it was not foreseeable. This was considered an act of God. I always wondered if this defense would work in the real world but it would require extensive documentation to prove it was not foreseeable to deny liability. You said you hit a truck, so now it up to your insurance company to prove to the other party that you did nothing wrong. Here is a little more information on that defense:
https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/car-accidents-caused-medical-emergency.html

Do you know if they paid the other party? Was it just property damage or was someone else hurt? Fault would of had to be determined before they would pay out.
When I was training as an adjuster, they went over this similar scenario and asked us who was at fault. A person is driving and has a sudden heart attack and causes an accident. The person appeared to be healthy and has been getting a physical every year with a clean bill of health. Is the person at fault? We were told that there was no negligence because it was not foreseeable. This was considered an act of God. I always wondered if this defense would work in the real world but it would require extensive documentation to prove it was not foreseeable to deny liability. You said you hit a truck, so now it up to your insurance company to prove to the other party that you did nothing wrong. Here is a little more information on that defense:
https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/car-accidents-caused-medical-emergency.html

Do you know if they paid the other party? Was it just property damage or was someone else hurt? Fault would of had to be determined before they would pay out.
The truck was empty. No one, including me, bot hurt.
 
Sep 22, 2014
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#10
If you decide to go through the State Ins. Dept., it can really only be to speed up the decision. The company has done nothing wrong otherwise. And remember, they might not decide in your favor. You are the one who said you were at fault and your post seems to indicate that it took you awhile to decide you were not at fault. How long in-between the accident and your change of mind to not-at-fault? That could be a major factor in the insurance company taking longer. In my state (I do not know about yours), if the pro-insured decision comes after the new increased bill, the amount would be adjusted lower and refunded to me. The other option you would have is to shop around and get rates with other insurance companies to see if one would be lower no matter what the decision from CSAA.
I, a layperson, was speaking as one. I meant no one else did anything wrong, not some sophisticated comment in insurance-ese. It was only after I told one of the CSAA people over the phone what had happened that she said it should have been no-fault medical. My realization of what had happened did not cause me to realize that; her professional comment was what brought the concept to me. Hope that's clear.