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May 28, 2019
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#21
My colleagues have expressed the truth very well. Rather than arguing who is more gullible than whom, use an easier criteria. If the information you're reading is not written in clear, correct English, assume it's a scam. Real information is written by people who can use grammar, syntax and vocabulary correctly. The bad guys have bad English, an easy "tell".
This isn’t helpful for people who are non-native English speakers, who are often not able to recognize “bad” English. (In fact, even advertisements from legit business enterprises in countries where English is a second language are filled with grammatical problems.
 
Likes: jsn55
Jun 24, 2019
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#22
My colleagues have expressed the truth very well. Rather than arguing who is more gullible than whom, use an easier criteria. If the information you're reading is not written in clear, correct English, assume it's a scam. Real information is written by people who can use grammar, syntax and vocabulary correctly. The bad guys have bad English, an easy "tell".

There is a school of thought that the bad grammar and spelling errors are deliberate. Folks who blow past those problems are likely to be more gullible.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#23
This isn’t helpful for people who are non-native English speakers, who are often not able to recognize “bad” English. (In fact, even advertisements from legit business enterprises in countries where English is a second language are filled with grammatical problems.
You are so right. I would hope that people contact someone who is fluent in English for assistance.
 
Sep 22, 2015
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#24
I have applied for the job in quickr I have got a call and they said we have * rounds for interview and for first round you have to pay 2000 for registration and 7000for training which is refundable when I go to airport for face to face interview is this real job offer plz say me and they given me the ac no for payment Account holder name-indigo pvt. Ltd.* This is the one is this the correct plz say me
I would improve my lingual and typing skills before applying for any job
 
May 28, 2019
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#27
The OP lives in India- that is a little unfair.
I’d view this with a bit of humor if I were the OP… the person criticizing the OP made grammatical/word choice/punctuation errors him/herself.

But, yes, it’s clear that the OP is a non-native English speaker. Presumably the scam is targeting that population — and anyone else looking to hire someone who’s a non-native speaker in a legitimate job would generally be somewhat charitable in their assessment of language skills (as long as the job didn’t require those skills for the actual performance of those tasks).