Comcast changed email address with authorization from customer

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Dec 16, 2020
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I have been a cable customer of Comcast, in good standings, for approx. 30 years. I wanted to change my email’s display name, on May 1, 2019, from Sam McPherson to S. McPherson to possibly resolve an issue where someone apparently compromised my email. I called Comcast and spoke with a female about what I wanted to accomplish. As she was processing what I thought was changing my display name she disconnected our call after putting me on hold.

I called back later that day and spoke with Hose and he told me that she had changed my email address to “[email protected]” without my authorization. I immediately asked to speak to his supervisor. Armando came on the phone and told me the same thing. But he said Comcast would escalate the issue and get back to me because once you change email addresses you can never get it back. As of today (12/16/2020), I’ve heard nothing.

Two days later I called back again and spoke to Jerry about changing my email address to a more acceptable one. And now the real work begins.

I individually had to change my email address for more than 200 contacts such as, but not limited to, banking institutions, 401K service, employer, business clients, and personal contacts. Because sites require different procedures for changing email addresses it was absolutely grueling. Paypal even asked what color was the old minivan that I no longer have. And I am still making changes as of today because to secure certain services on some websites, you need to change that old email address as well.

I've had numerous contacts with Comcast and Pamela P. (Executive Customer Relations, Corporate Escalations - Big South Region) offered me one (1) month of free service ($170.00) on 10/28/2019, but I declined because it was totally inadequate. I asked Comcast to check the recording of our phone conversations and they said they were not able to retrieve any. That's very odd!

As a 73 - year old disabled Vietnam Army veteran who has been a cable customer for 30 years, may I suggest giving me 100% credit on future monthly bills as long as I have your cable service. I believe that it is more than fair.
 
May 9, 2019
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If it's simply your display name and not your actual email address, you could have done that yourself in the Email setting on the Comcast website. Since they misunderstood what your were asking, did you ask if they could at least change the email back to the original to prevent the issues you later encountered? Also, asking for the amount of compensation you stated is quite unrealistic and will not be taken seriously. If it were me, I would have taken their original offer, which I believe was really quite fair.

 
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Aug 29, 2018
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If your email address was compromised, you should confirm the recovery methods are yours, and then you should change your password. Your display name is, or should be, irrelevant to where you have used your email address. So I do not understand why they changed your email address. I also do not know why you cannot get your previous email address restored.

That said, while some compensation for the unwanted change seems relevant, "100% credit on future monthly bills as long as I have your service" seems excessive to me, and I would likely dismiss the request unanswered.
 
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VoR61

Jan 6, 2015
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Comcast provides instructions for you to change your name in this link: Name Change

Nonetheless, a phone representative should have understood and properly completed your request. And the result of this error was, as you stated, "grueling". Unfortunately, I think, Comcast is not going to give you "100% credit on future monthly bills as long as I have your cable service".

There are two things that I can recommend to you at this point. First, to avoid future occurrences you should setup a gmail, outlook, or yahoo email account and slowly migrate to that address. Comcast is a regional service and if you should ever move to an area that is not serviced by them you will experience the pain again with an immediate need for resolution. By doing this migration now, you can slowly advise your contacts and then be portable going forward.

The second recommendation is to escalate this with a request for a 90 day service credit. If your request is within reason, they may be inclined to grant it. Whatever you decide, keep your emails polite . . .
 

Skippy

May 30, 2019
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100% agree with the prior post. I had to go through a similar BS with AT&T DSL several years ago when they changed my domain without notice. That was when I made the transition to gmail.
  • Don't push for more than an incremental goodwill gesture. A heavy demand for unlimited free service could as an outlier possibility result in a termination of service. Seriously. Comcast is required to provide cable service to your home; however, in most jurisdictions, internet service is not obligatory.
  • Whatever you do, be polite in your communications.
  • In the meantime, move away from an email address that is tied to your Internet Service Provider.
 
May 9, 2019
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Who knows what the future holds, but right now Comcast will continue your email even after you discontinue service. As long as you login at least every 9 months, the email account will remain active. I was worried about that when I moved and had to change services. Everything was tied to my Comcast address, but wasn't a concern after all.
 
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Apr 28, 2020
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First is this actually from 2019...or did OP mean 2020. If it's 2019, it's a dead issue. Assuming it's 2020...

As someone who has some extensive prior experience with Comcast in trying to resolve escalated issues such as this, I would say you certainly could try the executive escalation methods stated here, but I don't know how far you are going to get. You already have received a response from an Executive Relations representative at the regional level and in my experience are likely not going to get a better offer unless it's maybe one or 2 months more of service credits as VoR61 suggested.

You're request for a 'lifetime' of free service for a customer service mistake is simply not reasonable, I'm sorry to say and they will dismiss you out of hand when you make that type of request. I know from personal experience that the time and anguish one goes through when something like this happens can't be overestimated or valued but that doesn't justify Comcast compensating you $1000 - $2000 per year indefinitely. People used to ask to pay them their hourly wage (which always seemed to be like $50 plus per hour) for all the time wasted on service issues etc., and although I really felt for them it just wasn't possible or realistic to think that will happen.

You are important and valued to front-line staff because they honestly want to help and make a difference. But to the corporation you are simply a number. Comcast does not, in the long run, care about you as customer. They talk a good game and sure they do their best to provide a pretty good product but they know ultimately most of their market has little to no other real choices. And then when something goes wrong, they also know that no matter what they do, they are either going to retain you or lose you, and most of that is out of their control.
 
Nov 27, 2019
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Maybe not for the OP, but in general, people should consider getting their own domain name (i.e. Bobthebuilder123.com or something similar. You can get one from Google for $12/year, and it comes with 100 email forwarding addresses that you can send to any account you want. So, you get the security benefit of having different addresses for different accounts (i.e. [email protected], [email protected], etc.), plus, if you change email providers, you just need to make an update at one location, rather then hundreds.
 

Skippy

May 30, 2019
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Maybe not for the OP, but in general, people should consider getting their own domain name (i.e. Bobthebuilder123.com or something similar. You can get one from Google for $12/year, and it comes with 100 email forwarding addresses that you can send to any account you want. So, you get the security benefit of having different addresses for different accounts (i.e. [email protected], [email protected], etc.), plus, if you change email providers, you just need to make an update at one location, rather then hundreds.
I have one of those, but I wouldn't recommend it to a 73 - year old disabled Vietnam Army veteran who isn't yet familiar with the gmail interface. They require a certain amount of set-up and maintenance.
 

VoR61

Jan 6, 2015
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I am going to add one further "idea" to consider for general email setup. Over the years we have tried various combinations to manage our email content. At one point we had 5 accounts. For several years now we have identified and chosen just two: one personal and one business, which I expect will serve us well going forward.

For personal emails, we chose GMAIL, as we really do not require filters for that content. Business emails, on the other hand, require a lot of filters so we chose outlook.com for that content. That domain has a set of rules that mirrors the ones for the Outlook application (from Office 20xx) and are absolutely terrific in filtering out the emails we don't need to see.

Finally, both have a forwarding feature that we use to send to the SMS/MMS gateway for our cell phone. So, we do not have to be at the computer to monitor inbound emails, and can login to reply. Why do this? For security purposes, we keep our android phone free of email accounts in case they are lost or stolen. We can, of course, still install and use the associate phone apps.

My added thoughts for you to consider Sam . . .
 
Dec 16, 2020
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Thank you guys for your advice. In the near future, I will start using one of my Gmail email addresses to take the place of the Comcast email address. For banking, credit cards, and other financial services I need to research Gmail for security concerns. What I did not state in my post, I am an Independent contractor (media) and have so many vendors and services associated with Comcast email. And to change all to Gmail is a very large task. For example, the issue with Comcast started in May 2019, I am still converting email addresses as late as last week. I will also consider lowering my demands. Thanks again!
 
Nov 27, 2019
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Thank you guys for your advice. In the near future, I will start using one of my Gmail email addresses to take the place of the Comcast email address. For banking, credit cards, and other financial services I need to research Gmail for security concerns. What I did not state in my post, I am an Independent contractor (media) and have so many vendors and services associated with Comcast email. And to change all to Gmail is a very large task. For example, the issue with Comcast started in May 2019, I am still converting email addresses as late as last week. I will also consider lowering my demands. Thanks again!

While no system is perfect from a security standpoint, Gmail is certainly as good or better than the other free email services out there.

Regardless of how you handle your email, two recommendations:

1. Use two-factor authentication for ANY account where it's available. That way, someone would need to not only get your email and password, but also your phone as well.
2. Use different passwords for different accounts, at least for the important ones. That way, if there was a breach at (for example), your credit card company, the hackers couldn't take that email and password and use it to get access to your email and other bank accounts.