CenturyLink Billing Dispute

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Jun 12, 2018
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#1
Hello,

My name is Nate and I have been a Centurylink internet customer for the past 2.5 years. Shortly, I will be moving to a different residence where internet is already being provided. Due to this, I called CenturyLink and asked them to disconnect my services. At this time, they told me that I had signed up for a 2 year commitment (autopay / internet billing), of which I had 5 months remaining. There would be a $200 disconnection fee if I continued.

I explained to the representative that I would never have signed up for such a two year program as I was never intending to live at my current address beyond this time. Even after explaining that there was no way I would have voluntarily enrolled in such a program, she was unwilling to make any accommodation for this item.

My position is that I never signed up for any two year commitment. As a customer of 2.5 years for CenturyLink, I would simply like to disconnect my services without a resulting fee. Would there be any advice on how to pursue getting this fee waived? Our Attorney General in MN has already pursued CenturyLink for deceptive billing practices. I am not sure if I would be better served pursuing the attorney general's office, or continuing to call CenturyLink. Any advice you could give would be appreciated.

Thank you,
Nate
 
Likes: Johnsonkl
Jan 30, 2018
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#2
Do you have a copy of your contract? This should lay out all the terms, and if indeed you signed it with a 2 year term, I would think you are out of luck. I think your only recourse would be a sympathetic person at Centurylink. The AG would likely say - hey, a contract is a contract.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#3
Hello,

My name is Nate and I have been a Centurylink internet customer for the past 2.5 years. Shortly, I will be moving to a different residence where internet is already being provided. Due to this, I called CenturyLink and asked them to disconnect my services. At this time, they told me that I had signed up for a 2 year commitment (autopay / internet billing), of which I had 5 months remaining. There would be a $200 disconnection fee if I continued.

I explained to the representative that I would never have signed up for such a two year program as I was never intending to live at my current address beyond this time. Even after explaining that there was no way I would have voluntarily enrolled in such a program, she was unwilling to make any accommodation for this item.

My position is that I never signed up for any two year commitment. As a customer of 2.5 years for CenturyLink, I would simply like to disconnect my services without a resulting fee. Would there be any advice on how to pursue getting this fee waived? Our Attorney General in MN has already pursued CenturyLink for deceptive billing practices. I am not sure if I would be better served pursuing the attorney general's office, or continuing to call CenturyLink. Any advice you could give would be appreciated.

Thank you,
Nate
If you've had the service for 2.5 years, they need to prove that you "re-signed up" (a common practice is to do this without advising you) at some point. Hang up the phone and handle this in writing. Send a polite, concise email to Customer Service explaining the issue. Clearly state that you aren't seeking any compensation, but you want their service disconnected on a certain date without any penalty or fees. They may come back with a bunch of gibberish, just reply sweetly that without the proof of an existing contract, you won't be paying a cancellation fee. I would immediately take your account off auto-pay to be sure nobody does an end-run and charges you the fee.
 
Apr 18, 2018
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#4
Try to get the paperwork or the recording of you accepting a two-year contract by an email. If they can't or won't produce the contract after a week I would submit what you have to the Attorney General. Lori helped out my wife after an eye doctor added on a large fee for something that was assumed part of the regular check-up. The letters she sends out mean business and businesses make sure everything is in order before standing ground. Good luck.
 
Jun 12, 2018
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#6
What amazing replies! Thank you everyone for replying to this. I ended up following the steps listed on Elliott's website and e-mailed Maxime Moreau. I received an e-mail the next day saying they would be waiving the fee.

I really liked the replies here. I never did sign anything, nor sign up for a two-year plan. If I would have needed to escalate further, I surely would have followed the steps suggested here.

Grateful for Elliott as a resource. Saved me $200 in fees for this item.

Sincerely,
Nate
 
Jan 9, 2016
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#9
I’m glad this all worked out, but FYI for any other readers, when you run into an issue that you cannot resolve with a utility (ex: electric or telco), the correct regulatory agency from which you may get some help is your state's public service commission or equivalent. Every state has an entity with a similar name. The AG (state) and the FTC (federal) are not the appropriate agencies. Utilities are very dependent on the goodwill of their public service commissions.