CELEBRITY CRUISES-HEARING AND SIGHT HANDICAPS

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Aug 29, 2015
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#21
The closed captioning signal on a satellite feed is a separate line down. The ship may not be receiving it. The network is not as robust when crossing the Atlantic as when simply in the Caribbean. You are well on your way across, past Bermuda, so the signal is less.

I completely agree with them not turning on the captions in the Celebrity Central (small theatre where they usually show movies) or the large theatre. The captioning covers part of the screen and can detract from the movie. Sorry, that is the way it is. The captions can cover some of the action at times. My deaf friend always watches movies at home for that reason, so as to not detract from the rest of us enjoying the movie.

Go down to guest relations and ask for the IT manager. His office is only a few feet away from guest relations on the ship. Ask HIM if the movies have the closed captions available and ask about the channels you desire. If it is who I think it is, he will be able to answer you. They may need to reset the Mac Mini that controls the TV in your room to provide them if they are available. Alternatively, hook up your computer or tablet to your TV and watch something you brought from home, or watch Netflix or Hulu. They should be offering a discounted streaming package by now.

As for the headphones for the theatre, they probably distributed them to the people who filled out the special needs paperwork ahead of time. They likely didn’t have extras on board or if they did handed them all out already. I’ve seen them in use on that ship, so I know they have them.

Note that Silhouette is my favorite ship in Celebrity’s fleet. The people on board are good and will do their best to assist you, but you get more if you smile and request rather than demand.
 

Carrie Livingston

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Jan 6, 2015
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#22
The closed captioning signal on a satellite feed is a separate line down. The ship may not be receiving it. The network is not as robust when crossing the Atlantic as when simply in the Caribbean. You are well on your way across, past Bermuda, so the signal is less.
I knew there was a simple explanation for the closed captioning. Most front line staff would not know anything about that. Thanks for the explanation.
 
Apr 3, 2016
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#24
Jan 6, 2015
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#25
Good for general information, but I do not know if they would apply to a cruise ship in international waters.
The section for "on board" would apply, I think, but the real reason I posted is for the overall presentation. It answers many questions about technology in a simple way, intertwining the FCC rules and ongoing efforts. And it is authoritative . . .
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#26
I believe this applies, as it speaks to cruise ships and captioning: https://www.ada.gov/regs2016/movie_rule.htm

First it states:

"The rule requires that movie theater auditoriums provide closed movie captioning and audio description when showing a digital movie distributed with such features unless doing so would result in an undue burden or a fundamental alteration."​

Then it adds exceptions:

The Department [DOJ] intended this definition to exclude drive-in movie theaters as well as facilities that screen movies if the facility is not used primarily for the purpose of showing movies for a fee, such as museums, hotels, resorts, or cruise ships, even if they charge an additional fee.​
The Department declines to make any changes at this time to address public accommodations that do not meet the definition of “movie theater” and are, therefore, not subject to the requirements of paragraph 36.303(g).​

This is from 2016 . . .
 
Likes: JVillegirl541
Aug 9, 2017
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#27
Ok- I will get slammed for this- but, seriously, I cannot understand why someone on a cruise would be so uptight about watching tv or movies! And, if I were to want to watch a movie- on a cruise or anywhere else, I would be highly annoyed if the screen were to be interrupted by closed captioning. And, if I have a disability- I do not expect the rest of the world to change for my benefit- it is my responsibility to arrange for the necessary adaptations. I understand and support the regulations to provide access to those who need it- but I do not understand those who believe that their right to access is greater than the rights or ability to participate of others. There is such a thing as "reasonable accomadation." The OP seems to be demanding unreasonable accommadation.
 
Likes: jsmithw
Apr 20, 2019
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#28
First of all, I want to thank all those who have contributed suggestions on what I should have done before my cruise and what I should do in the future. I finally met with Hoda, the manager, and the technician tonight. They explained what happened and why I am not seeing the captions on the TV screen and in the movies shown on board the cruise ship in their Celebrity 4 Theatre. At the same time, I also came to realize Customer Service was correct in saying the ship receives signals from satellites to show newscasts from BBC News, Fox News, etc. I also came to realize the ship needs to get signals from satellites when I saw these news programs being broadcast in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean where before while at port I thought the signals were coming from land. Now I understand. Also, Celebrity Silhouette did have ear phones for use in their theatre; when I had asked for the use of these ear phones the staff did not know about the fact that the ship did have those ear phones. Tonight they provided such ear phones. I guess some of the staff just never looked or thought about it until Hoda explained it to them. So I must have been the only person looking to use the ear phones in the theatre among all the passengers! As for the signals from the satellites, the Silhouette only has an encoding machine that pick up the signals for the TV programs but does not have another type of encoder that would add captions. Hoda and the technician explained Celebrity is working on fixing this problem as I write this message. Unfortunately, I probably will not be able to take advantage of this newest technology until I sail on Celebrity another time. But at least they are working on solving this issue. And they also told me Celebrity is also seeking a solution to having the use of ear phones in various venues around the cruise ships where staff speak from the stages or central part of an entertainment venue. Appears I seem to have been the one who high lighted the need for the use of ear phones in many other areas of the cruise ship for those who have similar hearing difficulties. And so it was explained Celebrity will try to fix this technology for those who are hearing impaired.
 
Apr 20, 2019
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#30
Response to ewkcpa. No, I am not going to "slam" you for your comments. I have not been able to understand what is spoken on TV nor in the Celebrity Silhouette theatre or Celebrity 4 Theatre because of my severe hearing loss. The closed captioning does not, in fact, interrupt, nor change the pictorial content because of the use of captions. Captions are printed at the very bottom of the screen leaving plenty of room for the content to be shown. Using my hearing aids in the cabin requires that I raise the volume for me to hear what is spoken but then that disturbs passengers some of whom are sleeping during the day and in some cases early enough in the evening. I have been asked by my steward to tone down the volume and have done so out of consideration for my fellow passengers. Yes, I wear hearing aids for each ear but unfortunately my hearing aids are the powerful type due to the fact that I am profound deaf (to put in layman's terms with something an 80% loss of hearing in each ear meaning I have less than 20% hearing at best). Add that to the fact that I also happen to have poor eyesight with the left eye legally blind and the right eye requiring me to lip read whatever I can see when the announcer speaks. Thus, I depend on what hearing I have for 50% of my understanding and 50% on being able to lip read. I am using the work "understanding" versus "hearing". For example, in Celebrity Silhouette's 4 Theatre my sight is not strong enough for me to read the lips of the people speaking from say a distance of say 10' from the screen to my front row chair. And I depend on lip reading to fully comprehend what is spoken besides what hearing I have the use. But if the movies were showing captions, the print would be larger for me to read what is said besides trying to "understand" what is said. I have difficulties in every day life as a result and more so when foreign born people speak with accented English; there is no way I can read lips the way I was taught in the hearing and deaf schools I attended. I hope the above explains where I am coming from.
 
Jan 6, 2015
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#32
Thank you VoR61 for your encouragement. It is always nice to have someone understanding what I need to do to cope with everyday life.
You are welcome. I really do understand, as my most recent test shows 90% loss in the upper range. This is where the consonants in particular fall off. I used to turn the TV up at home, but when the wife pointed out how loud it was, I tried captioning. It did block some of the screen, so I struggled at first but now I wouldn't do without it. In some cases, I've turned up a scene very loud and still can't hear what they are saying.

One negative is that for programs with a score or a ticker, the number and words are often blocked. Very frustrating as I note that captioning appears in various spots depending on what I'm viewing (so I know I can't fix that).
 
Feb 12, 2019
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#33
Just as an fyi if anyone didn't know it - my dad was talked into getting hearing aids with bluetooth. After a couple phone calls with the phone connecting directly to the hearing aids instead of trying to hear through the phone's speakers he was hooked. There is also a device you plug into your TV that then bluetooths the sound to the hearing aids. I don't know the specifics as he hasn't gotten it yet, but theoretically I would think one could plug it into the TV in your cabin or hotel room. There's also an app to adjust settings on the fly, even settings to get rid of ambient noise and such.
 
Aug 29, 2015
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#34
Glad to hear you met with the Guest Relations Manager. I don’t know Hoda, but all the GR people I’ve interacted in the past have always been helpful and polite.
I appreciate knowing about the decoder issue for the captions as well. That completely makes sense.

I’m sorry it isn’t fixed for this cruise, but I hope it will be for your next one.
 
Likes: VoR61
Sep 19, 2015
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#35
Not a cruise person so I did not comment earlier but I have to say special thank you to Algebralovr for so clearly explaining a complex problem and giving on point suggestions on how to address it.

And thank you to Neil for mentioning how to ensure accommodations for the disabled.

Doubt I will take a cruise in the near future but in case someone I know with disabilities does I will know what to suggest.
 
Likes: ADM and VoR61
Sep 19, 2015
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#36
Johnc082138 I am glad you got an explanation — I did not think the staff were lying but just not properly explaining the challenges of types of satellite reception on the open seas.

I am amazed at how much technology is available crossing the Atlantic on a ship and how many people made the crossing without the technology that we take for granted today.

I hope you enjoy the rest of the trip
 
Likes: VoR61

brillohead

Verified Member
Sep 21, 2018
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#37
Of course, with 401 points, I am well above the lowest ELITE level and should be able to get some satisfaction.
If you have cruised so much before, how is it that you weren't aware of what is available and the need to contact the Special Needs department to ensure that you have the necessary assistive devices available to you? This part has me totally confused.

The closed captioning does not, in fact, interrupt, nor change the pictorial content because of the use of captions. Captions are printed at the very bottom of the screen leaving plenty of room for the content to be shown.
I'm going to disagree with you here -- captions can and do distract many people. I understand that they are helpful to you -- I even use them myself quite often. But it is not true that they do not have an effect for everyone else -- they can be very distracting and draw attention away from the theatrical content of the video on the screen.

Directors are very particular about the way each scene is filmed, in order to evoke a particular mood / feeling in each scene. If captions really had no impact whatsoever on every watcher, they would automatically be included in every single show ever made. The fact of the matter is that they are distracting to many/most people, and are not automatically shown for that reason. To expect everyone in a movie theater to be distracted by captions to accommodate one person's need for them is a bit of a stretch.

I am glad that you were eventually able to meet up with Hoda and get some relief for your issues. In the future, I recommend you make a point of telling any customer service representative that you speak with that any and all contact with their department must be in writing or in person, as you are unable to use a telephone and also travel with someone who is unable to use a telephone. It was not at all unreasonable for Guest Relations to phone you to discuss the matter, if they were not aware that you wouldn't have a way to retrieve the message. Pointing it out to them in advance would allow them to better meet your needs, rather than just expecting them to know exactly what you can and cannot do.

And I'm glad that you now understand that the captions do indeed come from satellites (I didn't understand where you thought they came from when you kept insisting that they didn't come from the satellites. Did you think there was a really long cable stretching back to shore???), and hopefully you also understand that captions are not available for every single show.

In general, I have found that cruise lines are quite accommodating for those with special needs, but I've also found that it's necessary to plan ahead and be proactive about those special needs. In a case like yours, that could include filling out the Special Needs form and/or emailing the Special Needs department well in advance of your cruise, as well as bringing along your own adaptive devices (something like https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B078S7WK5M/ would allow you to watch tv in your room at a higher volume without disturbing neighbors).

I wish you all the best.
 
Feb 11, 2018
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#38
I'm disappointed about the impact this is having on your trip. From my experience, captions/subtitles are based on the video source. Some DVDs we rent have them and some do not. Some programs on our Dish receiver do and some do not. And so on . . .

Even if a TV, receiver, or disc player supports captioning or subtitles, the delivery media must contain them. We demoed a new TV device recently (similar to Roku), and turned on CC, but nothing showed. I assume that each "App" has it's own content delivery setup, and that's why that "software" solution did not show captioning.

So I believe it is possible that the source for their TV/theatre programs does not include captioning or subtitles . . .
You're right about the captions. I like to have captions when watching British shows because I sometimes have difficulty understanding the dialogue (many different accents!), but the captioning is not always available.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#39
Just as an fyi if anyone didn't know it - my dad was talked into getting hearing aids with bluetooth. After a couple phone calls with the phone connecting directly to the hearing aids instead of trying to hear through the phone's speakers he was hooked. There is also a device you plug into your TV that then bluetooths the sound to the hearing aids. I don't know the specifics as he hasn't gotten it yet, but theoretically I would think one could plug it into the TV in your cabin or hotel room. There's also an app to adjust settings on the fly, even settings to get rid of ambient noise and such.
This is great information, Lisa, thank you so much. As time goes by, the demographics of people with age-related issues will swell, so public places like airplanes and cruise ships and movie theaters need to gear up to serve that part of the population. We live in such a technology-rich society that all these adaptive things will start to become available and, hopefully, affordable.

As someone else mentioned, I have no issues with people who enunciate well. I can watch 60Minutes or any other professional narrator with no problem The rub comes with actors who slur their words, and/or accented English. I think there are great many people over 50 that have this kind of hearing loss. It's no big deal, but I would love to be able to watch a movie in a hotel or on a ship.