Cancelled cruise due to American Airlines mechanical issues

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Apr 23, 2018
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#21
This won't help the LW at all, but would the situation have been different if she had let the cruise line book her air when she booked the cruise?
 
Likes: Student
Jun 6, 2019
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#23
Weihlac is correct.

We have company contacts on top of our pages. You can try and write to AA but they don’t owe you anything for this.

When you fly through smaller airports, you really need to fly in a few days early. Especially using AA.

With your insurance, did you Insure the cruise AND the air? If you only insured the cruise, this is why your claim was denied. Both pieces must be insured.
Why do both parts - air and cruise - have to be insured? Is that the trick of these travel ins policies - that one must have covered the entire trip to claim under one of the policies?
 
Jul 13, 2016
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#25
Why do both parts - air and cruise - have to be insured? Is that the trick of these travel ins policies - that one must have covered the entire trip to claim under one of the policies?
The reason why you need one policy is that the lack of service by the first party (the airline) causes an involuntary loss of the second party (missing the cruise). Since the two are not connected, both must be covered
 

Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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#26
The reason why you need one policy is that the lack of service by the first party (the airline) causes an involuntary loss of the second party (missing the cruise). Since the two are not connected, both must be covered
That’s not even the entire issue- because they weren’t under one policy, the insurance for the cruise was declined because the reason for not getting there was not a covered reason.
 
Likes: VoR61

mmb

Verified Member
Jan 20, 2015
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#27
That’s not even the entire issue- because they weren’t under one policy, the insurance for the cruise was declined because the reason for not getting there was not a covered reason.
Are you saying there is no insurance policy that would handle this situation?
Obviously one has to be able to travel to the port, one way or another. If that Travel is provided by a vendor, and is therefore pretty much out of the control of the PAX, are you saying it is uninsurable under most travel insurance policies ?
 

Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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#28
Are you saying there is no insurance policy that would handle this situation?
Obviously one has to be able to travel to the port, one way or another. If that Travel is provided by a vendor, and is therefore pretty much out of the control of the PAX, are you saying it is uninsurable under most travel insurance policies ?
A single policy that was purchased to cover the air and cruise together should have. It also might have covered expenses for the OP to join the cruise at the first stop.

The policy must be purchased for the full trip- air and land together.
 
Likes: mschlick

Patina

Verified Member
Dec 22, 2015
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#29
A single policy that was purchased to cover the air and cruise together should have. It also might have covered expenses for the OP to join the cruise at the first stop.

The policy must be purchased for the full trip- air and land together.
Same with any pre-paid excursions, etc. One continuous policy.
 
Sep 27, 2018
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#30
For my own education on cruises, couldn't they have call the cruise line and met the ship at the next port, would have given them an extra day to get to a new destination?
 
Likes: BostonJohn
Feb 21, 2018
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#32
For my own education on cruises, couldn't they have call the cruise line and met the ship at the next port, would have given them an extra day to get to a new destination?
As Neil mentioned, it really depends on the ports involved.

The OP mentioned she was trying to fly to Puerto Rico for embarkation, so that tells me this is likely a Southern Caribbean route that hits a few of the smaller, southern islands. The OP also mentioned that the airline said 'nothing was available for days into the next week', presumably to Puerto Rico. That tell me that there may not have been much of anything flying from their home airport to any of the smaller islands to try and meet the ship - they'd likely have needed to get to Puerto Rico first, or fly to another airport with more flights. I can certainly understand how challenging it might be to find the right flight to meet the ship with any appreciable time remaining on the cruise.

Whenever one is flying to a port of embarkation for a cruise, it is wise to have a general idea of the number of flights available to be able to adequately set up a Plan B and even Plan C in the event of a delay or cancellation. Ships just don't wait, and missing the 'all aboard' time can ruin months of planning.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#35
As Neil mentioned, it really depends on the ports involved.

The OP mentioned she was trying to fly to Puerto Rico for embarkation, so that tells me this is likely a Southern Caribbean route that hits a few of the smaller, southern islands. The OP also mentioned that the airline said 'nothing was available for days into the next week', presumably to Puerto Rico. That tell me that there may not have been much of anything flying from their home airport to any of the smaller islands to try and meet the ship - they'd likely have needed to get to Puerto Rico first, or fly to another airport with more flights. I can certainly understand how challenging it might be to find the right flight to meet the ship with any appreciable time remaining on the cruise.

Whenever one is flying to a port of embarkation for a cruise, it is wise to have a general idea of the number of flights available to be able to adequately set up a Plan B and even Plan C in the event of a delay or cancellation. Ships just don't wait, and missing the 'all aboard' time can ruin months of planning.
You are so right, Msmayor ... I used to do this as a matter of course. But I've been incredibly lucky the last few years and got out of the habit. "Plan B, Plan C ... suss it out before you leave home". Excellent advice. The last thing I want to be doing at an airport is dorking around with the internet trying to find some solutions. I want to know who to contact and why ... I make a list of the following flights and hotels at any airport through which I connect ... and I write it on a piece of paper!
 
Likes: ADM and VoR61
Feb 13, 2018
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#38
All wonderful points, but let me add this thought..NEVER, I repeat NEVER, assume what your insurance covers or doesn't cover. Even a reputable insurance company might have denied this claim. ALWAYS check with your insurance company BEFORE taking action. Most have 24 hour emergency hotlines just for that purpose and may even offer concierge service to assist you. Whether or not you need to cancel, or claim trip interruption and go to a different port etc, can be easily determined by the insurance company. Often, insurance may not cover full cancellation due to airline mechanical failure, but they may instead offer coverage for assistance in getting to an alternate port, if that is indeed possible. And yes, make sure you are buying reputable insurance and that you understand the terms before you purchase. If you don't want to interpret a 21 page or more DOC, then perhaps rely upon a travel professional who is familiar.
 
Likes: mmb