Budget Viking issue (car accident, not at fault)

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Apr 19, 2019
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#1
Hello everyone,

Glad I found this forum!

I'll to keep this brief.

In early March 2019, I rented a car from Budget. All was well until I got rear ended. Cop was called. Police report indicated that I was not at fault. I called my insurance and other side's insurance. After much back and forth, my insurance told me that other side's insurance will be paying for everything. I called other side's insurance earlier this week. They said they will be paying the bill.

I got a letter from Viking today saying that I owe ~$650. $500 for repairs and $150 for fees and loss of use. I emailed Viking for clarification. They sent me the repair estimate (not even sure if they repaired the car) as well as pictures of the car. The damage is consistent with the accident I was in.

Just wondering how I should go about this.

I'm thinking that if I can get proof that the other side's insurance paid Budget for the repairs, then I should be able to tell Viking to deal with Budget and cancel my "debt."


Thanks in advance.
 

Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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#2
$500 sounds like a deductible from the insurance company. And if you only were charged $150 for loss of use, that’s amazing. Most insurance companies don’t cover loss of use.

You are responsible for paying any deductibles from the insurance company. You can try suing the other driver to recover that in small claims court. And try to negotiate the loss of use.
 
Likes: VoR61
Apr 19, 2019
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#3
$500 sounds like a deductible from the insurance company. And if you only were charged $150 for loss of use, that’s amazing. Most insurance companies don’t cover loss of use.

You are responsible for paying any deductibles from the insurance company. You can try suing the other driver to recover that in small claims court. And try to negotiate the loss of use.
Hi Neil. Thanks for taking the time to reply.

It's a little more than $500. And it matches the repair estimate bill they included in the email. It looks like the entire repair bill vs just the deductible.

But regardless of whether it's the deductible or actual repair bill, I thought it's always the party at fault who needs to pay for it. I remember being hit a long time ago. I didn't end up spending any money getting my car fixed, as the other side's insurance company took care of everything. Are the rules different for rental cars?

Anyway, it sounds like I'll be responsible for the $150 regardless. That's a bummer. But it's a lesson learned: don't be cheap next time and buy the waiver offered by the rental company.
 
Feb 12, 2019
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#4
Do you have anything that tells you which insurance they used to repair the rental car? If they went through yours then your deductible would still apply. And your insurance should subrogate to the insurance of the one at fault to get their money and your deductible back. But if they went straight to the insurance at fault then there shouldn't have been a deductible as it's covered under their property liability insurance vs through your insurance it hits your collision insurance.
 
Likes: bignevermo
Apr 19, 2019
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#5
Do you have anything that tells you which insurance they used to repair the rental car? If they went through yours then your deductible would still apply. And your insurance should subrogate to the insurance of the one at fault to get their money and your deductible back. But if they went straight to the insurance at fault then there shouldn't have been a deductible as it's covered under their property liability insurance vs through your insurance it hits your collision insurance.
My insurance emailed me saying that they didn't pay anything and that all damages are being paid by others' insurance. I'm going to call others' insurance today and ask for written proof of payment.

I've asked Viking via email to show me when Budget sent over the bill for collection as it's likely they've already been paid or are in the process of being paid. Viking is refusing to release that information.

Suppose everything goes smoothly and I get the proof that others' insurance has paid Budget and Budget wants to double-dip for money ... would I simply send this proof to Viking? Or does Budget need to get involved?

I just don't want this to turn into a game of ping pong where both sides say to go to the other side for answers.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
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Dec 27, 2014
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#8
You are responsible for the damages. The rental company doesn’t do any intervention with insurance unless you bought their insurance.

If your state is a no fault state it doesn’t matter who is at fault.

You need an itemized bill for damages to present to your insurance company and then you can go after the other driver in small claims court if necessary. There is usually blame assessed to both parties in this type of accident so it’s not always cut and dried.

You need to go through your insurance company.
 
Apr 19, 2019
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#9
You are responsible for the damages. The rental company doesn’t do any intervention with insurance unless you bought their insurance.

If your state is a no fault state it doesn’t matter who is at fault.

You need an itemized bill for damages to present to your insurance company and then you can go after the other driver in small claims court if necessary. There is usually blame assessed to both parties in this type of accident so it’s not always cut and dried.

You need to go through your insurance company.
That's quite illogical and annoying, no? It almost makes me wish it had been my own car that was rear-ended.

Fortunately I've been communicating with both my insurance and other's insurance. The person working at my insurance company on my case asked for the itemized bill as well as Viking's letter. He said he will make sure other's insurance gets the bills. He also kept saying that I wouldn't be responsible for the damages. Other's insurance told me via phone that they've already paid Budget. I tried to ask for proof earlier but didn't get anyone over the phone.

Fingers crossed for an easy resolution.


By the way, Neil ...

Would all of this have been avoided had I paid for the $30/d insurance waiver from Budget?
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
17,092
15,580
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#10
That's quite illogical and annoying, no? It almost makes me wish it had been my own car that was rear-ended.

Fortunately I've been communicating with both my insurance and other's insurance. The person working at my insurance company on my case asked for the itemized bill as well as Viking's letter. He said he will make sure other's insurance gets the bills. He also kept saying that I wouldn't be responsible for the damages. Other's insurance told me via phone that they've already paid Budget. I tried to ask for proof earlier but didn't get anyone over the phone.

Fingers crossed for an easy resolution.


By the way, Neil ...

Would all of this have been avoided had I paid for the $30/d insurance waiver from Budget?
It depends on if the waiver was for collision damage and not liability.

Read the contract from Budget- I’m sure you’ll find in the small print that it tells you that you are responsible for any damages.

It does make sense for Budget- they don’t want to wait months while two insurance companies fight out who is going to pay for damages. They need the car/truck fixed quickly and it back on the road for rentals.

They could go after you for loss of use while the truck is being repaired and out of service. Although that is easier to fight and have dropped.
 

Dwayne Coward

Administrator
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Director
Apr 13, 2016
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St. Louis
#11
That's quite illogical and annoying, no? It almost makes me wish it had been my own car that was rear-ended.

Fortunately I've been communicating with both my insurance and other's insurance. The person working at my insurance company on my case asked for the itemized bill as well as Viking's letter. He said he will make sure other's insurance gets the bills. He also kept saying that I wouldn't be responsible for the damages. Other's insurance told me via phone that they've already paid Budget. I tried to ask for proof earlier but didn't get anyone over the phone.

Fingers crossed for an easy resolution.


By the way, Neil ...

Would all of this have been avoided had I paid for the $30/d insurance waiver from Budget?
This is normal in the rental industry. If you didn't purchase their waiver, then the rental company will expect you to pay for the damages to the car you rented. It is then up to you to seek relief from the person/insurance company responsible. A lot of times, you can just file the claim with your insurance company, and they will handle it (though some may not pay for loss of use or administrative fees). This doesn't work as well when working through the other person's insurance company, as they are working on behalf of their client and may not accept full responsibility, and it may require you to seek legal counsel or small claims to sort out. If you have your own insurance, it is usually better to file with them, as they can usually handle working with the other insurance company better than you can yourself.

If you had accepted the rental agencies waiver, as long as there was no negligence on your part, they would waive your responsibility, and probably gone after the responsible person directly for reimbursement.
 
Mar 20, 2019
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#12
The $500 may very well be a standard "automatic" thing the rental car company does. I always rent cars with my Amex card that includes (for an additional per-rental fee) rental insurance with a -0- deductible. The last couple of rentals the agent has asked what my deductible is and tells me that they will charge that deductible to me immediately after an accident (as part of the LDW sales pitch). I have tried telling the agent I have no deductible but they refuse to believe me, instead insisting it must be $1,000 and puts that down. When I protest and tell them that is a silly thing to do because my insurance company will pay them 100% of claim with no deductible (so charging me would be inappropriate) their response is "well, you will have to work that out getting that back from your insurance after we have charged you".
 
Sep 26, 2017
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#13
The $500 may very well be a standard "automatic" thing the rental car company does. I always rent cars with my Amex card that includes (for an additional per-rental fee) rental insurance with a -0- deductible. The last couple of rentals the agent has asked what my deductible is and tells me that they will charge that deductible to me immediately after an accident (as part of the LDW sales pitch). I have tried telling the agent I have no deductible but they refuse to believe me, instead insisting it must be $1,000 and puts that down. When I protest and tell them that is a silly thing to do because my insurance company will pay them 100% of claim with no deductible (so charging me would be inappropriate) their response is "well, you will have to work that out getting that back from your insurance after we have charged you".
That response from the rental car company would be enough to make me walk out the door to a different rental company. It might not be a bad idea to get something in writing from Amex confirming the $0 deductible and keeping that with you when you travel, though. Might save some arguing with the rental car company.
 
Mar 20, 2019
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#14
That response from the rental car company would be enough to make me walk out the door to a different rental company. It might not be a bad idea to get something in writing from Amex confirming the $0 deductible and keeping that with you when you travel, though. Might save some arguing with the rental car company.
Well, it has happened with 2 different companies. The first time it was a company I have not used before and probably will avoid in the future due to the aggressive actions of the rental agent during the entire transaction. The problem with the "something in writing" since it is a "product" and not a policy there is not a piece of paper with my name on it with all the details, but instead just a web page that lists the features of the product (such as no deductible). I have printed that for future use, but I am thinking the agent likely won't be interested in seeing it since the point of the conversation is to sell me the LDW. In the end, I am contracting with the rental car company so legally I suppose I would be ultimately responsible and my insurance situation would be my problem. But then they shouldn't be asking for those insurance details if they are going to ignore my insurance, should they? In any case, not a very "customer friendly" way of doing business.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#15
The $500 may very well be a standard "automatic" thing the rental car company does. I always rent cars with my Amex card that includes (for an additional per-rental fee) rental insurance with a -0- deductible. The last couple of rentals the agent has asked what my deductible is and tells me that they will charge that deductible to me immediately after an accident (as part of the LDW sales pitch). I have tried telling the agent I have no deductible but they refuse to believe me, instead insisting it must be $1,000 and puts that down. When I protest and tell them that is a silly thing to do because my insurance company will pay them 100% of claim with no deductible (so charging me would be inappropriate) their response is "well, you will have to work that out getting that back from your insurance after we have charged you".

That is not surprising — they do not want to deal with your insurance policy and make claims against them and also have no recourse. It is an administrative hassle.

I often take the full insurance when renting in Italy — I do not want to deal with any issue later and internationally.
 
Mar 20, 2019
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#16
That is not surprising — they do not want to deal with your insurance policy and make claims against them and also have no recourse. It is an administrative hassle.

I often take the full insurance when renting in Italy — I do not want to deal with any issue later and internationally.
That would be true for minor damage, but for most accidents they are going to be dealing with an insurance company anyways. You would think being in the business they would be pros at dealing with the insurance companies. But I see your point on getting the agency's LDW. In the event you need to use it, it is way simpler than dealing with a third party. It's an interesting dynamic...the rental car companies are creating more value for their LDW product by being difficult to work with in the event of an accident if you don't buy the LDW.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
17,092
15,580
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#17
That response from the rental car company would be enough to make me walk out the door to a different rental company. It might not be a bad idea to get something in writing from Amex confirming the $0 deductible and keeping that with you when you travel, though. Might save some arguing with the rental car company.
They all do this . Yes you should carry the information with you but unless you buy the rental companies insurance, it’s up to you to make them whole and do the work on your own to get the damages paid for.
 
Mar 20, 2019
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#18
Agreed Neil that ultimately it is my responsibility to make them whole. But they aren't going to charge the price of the vehicle on my credit card the day I report the accident, so why charge a deductible that is incorrect on that day as the agent told me they would? In the event of an accident, we are going to have to work it out with the insurance company so why not wait a reasonable amount of time before hitting me with a charge that will just complicate things is my point. That and, in my opinion, the only reason I was getting this "requirement" information from the agent was to scare me into purchasing their LDW product. I can easily see how someone that is not 100% certain what coverage they already have would be "tricked" into purchasing something they might not need.