Best way to brush up on my Spanish

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Feb 15, 2018
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#1
Going to Spain with my daughter at the end of June. I used to speak Spanish well, but you know the saying: "use it or lose it". I've been practicing with Duolingo, a free online course. It's not bad, but is rather repetitive and tedious. I also got some Berlitz CD's. Does anyone have any suggestions or familiarity with other programs/resources? I prefer not to have to pay for Babbel, Rosetta Stone etc. Thanks!!
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#2
Going to Spain with my daughter at the end of June. I used to speak Spanish well, but you know the saying: "use it or lose it". I've been practicing with Duolingo, a free online course. It's not bad, but is rather repetitive and tedious. I also got some Berlitz CD's. Does anyone have any suggestions or familiarity with other programs/resources? I prefer not to have to pay for Babbel, Rosetta Stone etc. Thanks!!
I would contact a local high school or college and find someone who is willing to spend some time with you ... a couple of meetings over coffee or lunch will probably bring back most of the Spanish that still resides in your head. Other than formal courses which are very expensive, I can't think of a better solution. Perhaps my colleagues are more creative than I. I've never had any formal language training, but I find that in Italy or France after a week, I'm quite comfortable with the language, just from speaking and reading it. You might also look into something online like "Spanish for Tourists" which would bring it all back.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#4
If possible, go to authentic restaurants and speak with the staff; seriously I practice Italian and French this way.

Look for immigrants that will exchange conversation practice in Spanish for conversation in English.

If you want to actually participate in a culture and interact with people in a natural way, then actually speaking with them is the best way.

Translation software cannot replace human interaction in terms of accent, slang, colloquisms...
 
Jan 23, 2015
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#7
I recommend listening to Spanish music or watching TV shows in Spanish, to work on the listening part of your skills. The podcast Radio Ambulante is in Spanish and it is fascinating, a great way to immerse yourself. Remember that Spanish in Spain is different than Latin American Spanish in pronounciation and cadence. Perhaps it is a great time to watch some Spanish films (Almodovar!).
Otherwise I'd say talking with actual Spanish speakers will be your best bet. Are there meet up groups near you where people practice different languages?
Good luck.
 
Feb 15, 2018
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#8
Wow! Quick responses and very good suggestions. I live in a community with a large Hispanic population and work with some folks from Mexico. I have been practicing at a local Mexican restaurant and the people at work. I like the suggestion about watching films, TV shows and Radio Ambulante. Muchas Gracias!