Best Buy Defrauding AppleCare Customers

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Jul 26, 2019
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#1
Hello, appreciate this site and any guidance.

Bought a 2-Year AppleCare agreement with my iPhone XR at Best Buy. AppleCare is like an extended warranty for the iPhone. It costs $9.99 per month.

I go to make a claim 6 months later in the store and find that Best Buy cancelled my AppleCare agreement without notice a month earlier. Best Buy employee said they had a problem processing my payment.

No notice was ever sent to me. Best Buy didn't notify me of a problem with payment, nor that they were going to cancel the agreement, nor that they did cancel the agreement. There was no opportunity to rectify this within their 14 day grace period and it was cancelled.

My iPhone repair cost raised from $99 to $399 as a result of this. Best Buy would not reinstate the plan, nor offer me any credit.

I contacted Best Buy's customer service VP and their outreach team wrote me back saying they have "no obligation to notify customers of anything", and they were in the right to cancel. They recommended I contact Apple. Apple also said tough luck and that while there are events that would "qualify for reinstatement" this event would not.

I find this a bit crazy. How is this not consumer fraud? We trust Best Buy to service the AppleCare agreement, they cancel it without notice, then charge a 400% increase for repair? And Best Buy stands by this? A large online company such as Best Buy can certainly accomplish some way of notifying customers of all this so they are not left without coverage, so it begs the question why they don't want to. There are other examples of this on the Best Buy review site where they leave consumers in the dark and cancel AppleCare agreements against their will (attached is example).

So, what are options? Small claims? Could this be a class or consumer fraud suit? I'd imagine many others have been caught up in Best Buy's negligence and are being defrauded out of their good faith that Best Buy would properly service their AppleCare agreements. Consumers end up losing the agreements, losing their ability to warranty the phone (in no way can the agreement be reinstated by Best Buy or Apple once cancelled), and ultimately end up having to pay exorbitant repair costs back to Best Buy or Apple. Both are party to this and both ultimately profit from it. Not sure where to go from here as neither company will help.

Thank you for guidance.
 

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weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
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Maui Hawaii
#2
Hello, appreciate this site and any guidance.

Bought a 2-Year AppleCare agreement with my iPhone XR at Best Buy. AppleCare is like an extended warranty for the iPhone. It costs $9.99 per month.

I go to make a claim 6 months later in the store and find that Best Buy cancelled my AppleCare agreement without notice a month earlier. Best Buy employee said they had a problem processing my payment.

No notice was ever sent to me. Best Buy didn't notify me of a problem with payment, nor that they were going to cancel the agreement, nor that they did cancel the agreement. There was no opportunity to rectify this within their 14 day grace period and it was cancelled.

My iPhone repair cost raised from $99 to $399 as a result of this. Best Buy would not reinstate the plan, nor offer me any credit.

I contacted Best Buy's customer service VP and their outreach team wrote me back saying they have "no obligation to notify customers of anything", and they were in the right to cancel. They recommended I contact Apple. Apple also said tough luck and that while there are events that would "qualify for reinstatement" this event would not.

I find this a bit crazy. How is this not consumer fraud? We trust Best Buy to service the AppleCare agreement, they cancel it without notice, then charge a 400% increase for repair? And Best Buy stands by this? A large online company such as Best Buy can certainly accomplish some way of notifying customers of all this so they are not left without coverage, so it begs the question why they don't want to. There are other examples of this on the Best Buy review site where they leave consumers in the dark and cancel AppleCare agreements against their will (attached is example).

So, what are options? Small claims? Could this be a class or consumer fraud suit? I'd imagine many others have been caught up in Best Buy's negligence and are being defrauded out of their good faith that Best Buy would properly service their AppleCare agreements. Consumers end up losing the agreements, losing their ability to warranty the phone (in no way can the agreement be reinstated by Best Buy or Apple once cancelled), and ultimately end up having to pay exorbitant repair costs back to Best Buy or Apple. Both are party to this and both ultimately profit from it. Not sure where to go from here as neither company will help.

Thank you for guidance.
Did you determine that there was or was not a problem with the payment? Did you change credit cards or have an issue with the card you were using to pay the monthly $9.99? Remember you have saved 19 months of Applecare payments.

If you wish to pursue further, here are Best Buy contacts: https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/best-buy/

Here is how to write:
https://forum.elliott.org/threads/resolving-consumer-complaints-and-developing-a-paper-trail.8903/

Your options of a class action are not likely to succeed as you have no evidence that there is a class affected by this. What you imagine is not grounds for a class action suit.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Jun 24, 2019
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#3
Presumably the $9.99 AppleCare was deducted from your checking account or charged to a credit card. When is the last payment you made and wat time period did it cover? When did you go into the store? What was the problem with the iPhone? Do you know why Best Buy had a problem with your payment?
 
Jul 26, 2019
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#4
Great point in saving 19 months of AppleCare payments. Assuming there is only 1 claim for the life of the phone I'd only be out $110 and not $300.

Yes, there was unauthorized activity on my card, so the card processor denied payments during that time. Any problems during this time I received e-mails from companies, i.e Netflix, etc. so I was able to fix.

Problem with iPhone is a crack on the back glass which is why I went to Best Buy store as they can service Apple products now. They were unable to do a glass repair and needed to replace the entire unit. It is $99 with AppleCare, $399 without AppleCare.

The last payment was in April/May and covered period through June 15, grace period to fix payment problem was through June 30th. So of course my claim happens just after this.

I did contact primary contact on that Best Buy contact page (Trish Walker) after getting shut down in the store and on the phone. She forwarded to their executive outreach who said they would not do anything. While I perhaps agree it may be physically impossible for Best Buy to reinstate once agreement is cancelled as Apple systems may not let them (due to serial number now being ineligible for AppleCare), Best Buy didn't offer anything to compensate, and didn't say you missed an e-mail, but rather we don't have to tell you anything. Best Buy has taken a hard line in the past when I've dealt with them, although I thought things had gotten much better, I guess not.

Now that Best Buy is a reseller of Apple service plans and servicing Apple customers, I figured they would be more customer-centric as is the Apple brand (Apple store experience and dealing with Apple always seems to go the extra mile).

Also surprised Apple shut it down, but they probably see this as not their problem as it was a reseller, but I can almost guarantee Apple would have notified me if there was a problem had I bought it directly through Apple.
 
Jul 26, 2019
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#5
Your options of a class action are not likely to succeed as you have no evidence that there is a class affected by this. What you imagine is not grounds for a class action suit.
Curious, what defines a class? 40 people? 100 people? I recall in 2013 a class for an Apple suit where apple paid out $53M for failing to honor warranties. Apple claimed the iPhone water sensor was triggered due to user negligence and denied claims when in fact it was humidity causing it to trigger due to faulty 3M tape. I'm sure a lot of people left dumbfounded leaving the store having to pay up and unfairly treated. Having to pay up due to a warranty cancelled from under you when you trust they will service the warranty feels a bit similar.
 
Feb 21, 2018
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#6
I am sympathetic to your plight as I have myself had horrible experiences with Best Buy. Trish Walker was one of the individuals who I appealed to when I had problems and I never got an answer from her at all and had to move higher up the 'food chain'.

That being said, you are tossing around the term of 'negligence' in describing Best Buy but you have to own at least half of this problem yourself. You knew there had been unauthorized activity on your card, you knew that payments had been denied...this should have triggered an immediate response by you to reach out to every company you'd permitted to charge that card to make sure that future payments were successful. While I'll agree that it is a courtesy for a company to reach out and inform that they did not receive a payment, they have no obligation to do so. The Company isn't responsible to follow up on a missing payment - that is your job.

I did mention that I struggled with Best Buy to get a resolution with my problem (it was related to an HP laptop repair that was needed just outside of the original warranty period). I ended up appealing to HP and found a sympathetic ear. They were willing to either split the repair bill with me or provide me with $150 in gift cards as a goodwill gesture. Perhaps a well-worded request to Apple, explaining the situation and asking for an exception, you may find a similar sympathetic ear.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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#7
Too many original posts start off with the concept that some business has "defrauded" the poster. Yet in the post and subsequent followups there is no evidence of fraud. Perhaps sloth and indifference, perhaps adherence to an unfriendly corporate policy. And then there is the immediate move to a threat of legal action or, gasp, a class action lawsuit.

Fraud would require that Best Buy do or say something upon which you relied, to your financial loss. That is, in this instance, that Best Buy represented that if a payment you made bounced Best Buy would affirmatively contact you. I see no such claim by you. Sure, it would be nice if Best Buy wrote to you and said, "Hey, your payment bounced, can you fix that?", but I see no claim by you that Best Buy was required to do so. As I've only had AppleCare through Apple, I have no experience with a third party seller of that service. (I should note I'm no fan of Best Buy.)

Best Buy is probably financially motivated to keep you paying the $9.99 per month, as Best Buy probably gets a piece of that action as a third-party re-seller. Not to speak of motivated to keep you as a customer.

As to the "class action." It sems to me that your class, if one exists, are Best Buy customers who purchased Apple Care where Best Buy has failed to notify customers that their regular payment has bounced. Separate from whether Best Buy had any contractual obligation to do so, just how many people do you think are similarly situated?

I've had credit cards hacked. It's a giant annoyance. And I have a credit card now that I only use for automated payments and never leaves the house, and it has been hacked. And then I have to scramble and figure out who I have to notify, between some monthly accounts, quarterly accounts, biannual accounts, and annual accounts. I'm grateful to those merchants who alert me that the card has bounced, but I always thought it was my obligation to sort it out.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#8
Often companies do not reach out if a payment is missed.

Did you not notice the lack of charge on the account? Especially with other companies notifying?

Usually when cards are hacked etc the card companies tell the person to contact all companies with auto bill and make sure everything goes through.

I am not sure there is a legal obligation to inform someone that their AppleCare payment did not go through. It is usually the other way around — customer make sure bills are paid.
 
Mar 12, 2019
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#9
Yes, there was unauthorized activity on my card, so the card processor denied payments during that time. Any problems during this time I received e-mails from companies, i.e Netflix, etc. so I was able to
So what happened to Best Buy? You should have known it wasn’t receiving payments as scheduled. Why do you wait to be notified? It’s your responsibility to ensure your bills are paid on time.
 
Jul 26, 2019
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#10
Let's play it out:

1) Let's say it isn't best Buy's obligation to notify customers in this day and age, where the expectation is that companies will notify customers of problems servicing their agreements (especially in insurance situations where the other side of the outcome can have steep costs), and put the onus squarely on the consumer.

2) Let's also say that we ignore another "day and age" benefit where an expectation is set that credit card companies recognize monthly recurring charges and allow them to go through in spite of any problems on the account, and put onus squarely on consumer.

3) Let's also have the consumer call the dozens of companies that charge them on a monthly recurring basis to "check everything" even though when consumer calls those companies their call center people say "looks good" on our side, until the charge actually hits, which can be 20 or so different days in a month if you have 20 services, at which point you would schedule 20 follow-up appointments to call on the day of the charge to validate it's all good.

4) Finally, let's take the plight of "kjayking", who posted a review a year ago on Best Buy's website (attached to my first post), where they did reach out to Best Buy to update payment information and Best Buy still cancelled their AppleCare agreement, as there is no way to view or check if everything is OK. So we put onus squarely on the consumer that Best Buy got the message, has it together, and won't cancel it despite their best effort.

So - 1,2,3,4, 100% your fault consumer.

--

Now we move beyond the billing issue, as consumer was squarely at fault:

Is it still Best Buy's responsibility to notify the consumer they cancelled the warranty agreement? Perhaps allowing the consumer to rectify any problems in the 14-day "grace period"?

At what point are they negligent, or fraudulent?
--

This is great debate on the merits -- ultimately this comes down to being a good servicer. Yes, there are shady companies out there that would hope customers miss payments so they can collect more -- of course. But I choose not to do business with those companies because as some have posted, it seems there are always problems with credit cards for whatever reason, and I prefer companies that understand are willing to work with the consumer and not dismiss them.

This is all a mismatch of expectations. I put the Apple expectation on the Best Buy brand. I'll take fault for that, and I'm ultimately paying for it. In hindsight I should have bought the phone from Apple and the warranty from Apple, as Apple confirmed notifications would take place had I bought directly through them.

--

So this could play out in legal form, corporate form, or both. Perhaps Apple wants Best Buy to be more courteous, perhaps not, and that could change, but up to them. Legal wise, have not gone into fine print on notifications, warranty, grace period, and recourse -- agree that may need to be done to validate the extent of words like fraudulent and negligent. Also I'm sure they sell millions of phones and process millions of credit cards so I'm sure a lot of agreements were cancelled.

My only basis thus far is around expectation and current circumstances as I'm having to pay because they continued to accept my money to service agreement in good faith, didn't notify of any problems, and didn't notify of cancellations.

What was I paying them for again?
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
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#11
Let's play it out:

1) Let's say it isn't best Buy's obligation to notify customers in this day and age, where the expectation is that companies will notify customers of problems servicing their agreements (especially in insurance situations where the other side of the outcome can have steep costs), and put the onus squarely on the consumer.

2) Let's also say that we ignore another "day and age" benefit where an expectation is set that credit card companies recognize monthly recurring charges and allow them to go through in spite of any problems on the account, and put onus squarely on consumer.

3) Let's also have the consumer call the dozens of companies that charge them on a monthly recurring basis to "check everything" even though when consumer calls those companies their call center people say "looks good" on our side, until the charge actually hits, which can be 20 or so different days in a month if you have 20 services, at which point you would schedule 20 follow-up appointments to call on the day of the charge to validate it's all good.

4) Finally, let's take the plight of "kjayking", who posted a review a year ago on Best Buy's website (attached to my first post), where they did reach out to Best Buy to update payment information and Best Buy still cancelled their AppleCare agreement, as there is no way to view or check if everything is OK. So we put onus squarely on the consumer that Best Buy got the message, has it together, and won't cancel it despite their best effort.

So - 1,2,3,4, 100% your fault consumer.

--

Now we move beyond the billing issue, as consumer was squarely at fault:

Is it still Best Buy's responsibility to notify the consumer they cancelled the warranty agreement? Perhaps allowing the consumer to rectify any problems in the 14-day "grace period"?

At what point are they negligent, or fraudulent?
--

This is great debate on the merits -- ultimately this comes down to being a good servicer. Yes, there are shady companies out there that would hope customers miss payments so they can collect more -- of course. But I choose not to do business with those companies because as some have posted, it seems there are always problems with credit cards for whatever reason, and I prefer companies that understand are willing to work with the consumer and not dismiss them.

This is all a mismatch of expectations. I put the Apple expectation on the Best Buy brand. I'll take fault for that, and I'm ultimately paying for it. In hindsight I should have bought the phone from Apple and the warranty from Apple, as Apple confirmed notifications would take place had I bought directly through them.

--

So this could play out in legal form, corporate form, or both. Perhaps Apple wants Best Buy to be more courteous, perhaps not, and that could change, but up to them. Legal wise, have not gone into fine print on notifications, warranty, grace period, and recourse -- agree that may need to be done to validate the extent of words like fraudulent and negligent. Also I'm sure they sell millions of phones and process millions of credit cards so I'm sure a lot of agreements were cancelled.

My only basis thus far is around expectation and current circumstances as I'm having to pay because they continued to accept my money to service agreement in good faith, didn't notify of any problems, and didn't notify of cancellations.

What was I paying them for again?
You have said that your credit card was NOT paying them. You were paying nothing for a contract which therefore becomes void.

"Yes, there was unauthorized activity on my card, so the card processor denied payments during that time. Any problems during this time I received e-mails from companies, i.e Netflix, etc. so I was able to fix." You left out a very important piece of information in your first post. You now state that you KNEW that your card was compromised.

It is entirely your responsibility to switch the payment method on all of your accounts billed to the compromised card. It is not the responsibility of BestBuy or anyone else to track you down and make you pay your contracted payments.
You have no grounds for a class action or any other action against BestBuy or Apple. You needed to change your payment source when you knew your card was no longer valid.

Compromised cards happen all the time. It is the consumers' responsibility to make sure their payment method is valid at all times.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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New York
www.promalvacations.com
#12
I am sympathetic to your plight as I have myself had horrible experiences with Best Buy. Trish Walker was one of the individuals who I appealed to when I had problems and I never got an answer from her at all and had to move higher up the 'food chain'.

That being said, you are tossing around the term of 'negligence' in describing Best Buy but you have to own at least half of this problem yourself. You knew there had been unauthorized activity on your card, you knew that payments had been denied...this should have triggered an immediate response by you to reach out to every company you'd permitted to charge that card to make sure that future payments were successful. While I'll agree that it is a courtesy for a company to reach out and inform that they did not receive a payment, they have no obligation to do so. The Company isn't responsible to follow up on a missing payment - that is your job.

I did mention that I struggled with Best Buy to get a resolution with my problem (it was related to an HP laptop repair that was needed just outside of the original warranty period). I ended up appealing to HP and found a sympathetic ear. They were willing to either split the repair bill with me or provide me with $150 in gift cards as a goodwill gesture. Perhaps a well-worded request to Apple, explaining the situation and asking for an exception, you may find a similar sympathetic ear.
Exactly. Are you certain that there were no emails that went into your spam? Do you review your statements every month to ensure that auto payments have been properly deducted?

They also didn’t defraud you so if you accused them of that you already set off a negative interaction that out them on the defensive. It’s up to you when you change credit cards go notify anyone you had auto payments being made and give them the new number.

This happened to me two years ago and I took two months of old statements and went through them One by one and changed the automatic payments that my new card to avoid this. I also have EZ Pass and wanted to make sure I didn’t have any issues.

You can use the information Weihlac posted and
you can try nicely appealing to them and tell them what happened and ask if you can pay up the past payment and if they could re-instate you.
 
Jun 24, 2019
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#13
My experience with credit card fraud is not that the card issuer stops processing payments for a brief time. Rather, some time during my phone call the card is closed. Permanently. Then it's my sad job to find those recurring charges.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Feb 21, 2018
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#14
My experience with credit card fraud is not that the card issuer stops processing payments for a brief time. Rather, some time during my phone call the card is closed. Permanently. Then it's my sad job to find those recurring charges.
If you review statements regularly, it shouldn't be that difficult to determine who you need to reach out to.

Not sure if this feature is available to all Amex cardholders, but I have had my account over 35 years and whenever fraudulent activity was noted on my account that required closing and opening a new account number, Amex has always made sure that any auto-charges transfer right over to the new number. I've never had to reach out to companies to make the change.

I do, however, have to update the card number when the 'original' (now cancelled) card reaches what would have been the expiration date. At that point, the companies on auto-charge would no longer be able to process a charge because they have no good expiration date.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Nov 30, 2018
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#15
I'm going through this right now. I am reviewing my credit card statements for the last 4 months to identify any auto payments that need to be updated to a new card number.

It isn't turning out to be any problem to do this. In fact, my credit card company advised me in the email about my compromised card that I need to do this.

I'm old school, admitted, but I also have a list of all creditors that need to be paid, and I check it each month to be sure everyone on the list was paid. Since one late payment can cost me $35, it's worth my 15 minutes a month to do so.

OP, I realize you are upset about your expense to repair your phone, but this could be a cheap learning experience to check all of your credit card and bank statements monthly.
 
Mar 12, 2019
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#16
Is it still Best Buy's responsibility to notify the consumer they cancelled the warranty agreement? Perhaps allowing the consumer to rectify any problems in the 14-day "grace period"?
It’s the other way around. In effect, you told them you longer wanted to be in the Plan when they stopped receiving payments from you, and they listened. Did you read the fine print?
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#17
Certain insurances have to notify people of cancellations due to non payment because of the law and state insurance commissions. This is the case of health insurance as an example.

But once someone has been notified of problems (ie Netflix) was there no effort made to ensure others were paid? When one is aware of a problem one has to be vigilant.

Yes it would be helpful if BB would notify — but there are tech glitches and aggressive spam filters— so no system is perfect.

But to accuse BB of fraud is disingenuous— fraud is taking your money and not getting what was paid for.
You are asking for the benefit of something not paid for.

Look at AppleCare section 8.2 on terms and conditions

“Your failure to timely and fully make any monthly payment will be deemed an expression of your intent to cancel your Plan consistent with the schedule described in this section.”
https://www.apple.com/legal/sales-support/applecare/applecareplus/docs/applecareplusnaen.html

All this talk of fraud and class action and no warning — where is the responsibility to make sure the bills are paid especially when aware of billing problems with a card?
 
Jul 26, 2019
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#18
I agree with all the points. I'll admit to being stuck in the day and age. We don't actually hand over money to these companies for recurring monthly subscriptions, we give them a credit card and put the onus on them to collect every month. Are they "receiving payments from me", or "collecting payments from my credit card company" automatically each month? I suppose it's unfortunate we couldn't clarify or negotiate these terms while at the register.

There is plenty of opportunity for companies to simply do their job, process payment, and if failed, cancel the customer. But I don't experience this across the hundreds of companies and thousands of transactions over many years. Looks like I've been lucky. If there was ever a problem with payment I was notified and it was fixed.

Apple advised they would issue notices in this situation if the agreement was contracted through them.

The other Best Buy reviewer went to great lengths to advise Best Buy of payment changes and they still cancelled her. What is her recourse? I guess she didn't pay, even though she worked hard and tried to pay by updating her information, she still got cancelled as they chose not to properly process it (read: she didn't pay). The language will of course protect the company. There is plenty of legal language stated around how the customer must provide notice to cancel, but nothing saying the opposite.

So, I suppose there is no recourse, as we can all agree it's not Best Buy's failure to process an automated payment but the consumers failure for not forcing them to accept a payment and obtain a receipt when it was due. Speaking of, it would be nice if Best Buy sent a monthly receipt outlining where things are at with the payments and the 2-year agreement, but they don't have to do that either.

In the end, I'm happy a lot of companies out there aren't "teaching customers lessons", as I'm sure there is plenty of opportunity.


Suppose water and power went off quickly after a payment problem, utilities could collect much faster and save all the time and effort with notices. This would also serve as a strong reminder to keep close records of every company and recurring charge in the digital subscription age through a nice spreadsheet or database. Now we can verify charges on each day (after the few days it takes to post to the credit card of course).

We just signed up for Hulu? How much is it? What credit card did we use? When does it bill? Let's update the spreadsheet. Oh, we cancelled it and changed to HBO, should have remembered to update. Ugh, was that through the AppleTV or the cable company? Same card? Search, line 64, updated. Turn to page 3, updated.

AppleCare through Best Buy? Let me read the fine print. Oh wow, if they don't collect the monthly payment we will be cancelled. I sure hope they notify us if there is ever a problem because they don't send receipts! How will we know if they processed the payment? I'll be sure to check my credit card statement every month. How much was it, $9.99? I'll be sure to keep an eye out. They didn't charge us this month! I'm going to call them. Oh no, we were cancelled as there was a problem with our payment. I should have checked more often or called Best Buy every month on the 27th to ensure our payment went through.

As this became more and more unmanageable as things came on and off line so quickly with all the various phones, devices, and subscriptions, we asked, for what? Companies adapted to this, they recognize what is happening with all these subscriptions, are being transparent and communicating, and they want the business, they want to get paid. But not in these cases, not for Best Buy, and they stand by it. Perhaps they are used to people coming in the store, purchasing one-time and leaving, not to return for some time. Perhaps Best Buy struggles to properly manage and service a 2-year subscription model that involves insurance and monthly payments, which can be more challenging to operate, have bigger consequences for non-payment, not only a late fee.

Again, my expectations set way too high, thousands of transactions, dozens of companies, many years. All Best Buy taught me is to limit my business with Best Buy. I appreciate all the organizations who work hard to service my subscriptions every day, and thoughtfully communicate if there is a payment problem.
 
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#19
It is customer responsibility wholly to be on top of how their finances are being handled; I keep a list of all my credit card expiration dates so I know when to expect the new cards; I no longer use credit cards (and I only did for two places anyway) for automated payments but when I had those scheduled, I checked each and every month (took about 60 seconds) to be sure it all went through; I am signed up for every single alert my banks offer as to charges, due dates for bank paid automated payments, etc and confirm all have been made in a timely way.

It is our responsibility -

You say you had unauthorized use on that credit card - did that card then not get canceled and you had to submit new card info to all the payees? Did you actually keep a credit card that had had such unauthorized use? I may have missed this part but anytime I've had a card's info stolen (and I am notified immediately as I am signed up for all those alerts), the card is canceled, I receive a new one and replace old info with new card info with any vendors

There is no class action here nor is there is a legal challenge to be made.

I get being upset but personally, I'd take this as a learning moment and put some safeguards in place for the future for your financial health.