American Airlines misinformed me costing me half my spring break vacation

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Feb 16, 2018
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#22
From what I can see that flight took off 15 minutes late, and arrived early in Dallas. What time did you speak to the representative at the counter? Is it possible that you missed the check-in time and they removed you from the flight for that reason?
 
May 10, 2019
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#23
From what I can see that flight took off 15 minutes late, and arrived early in Dallas. What time did you speak to the representative at the counter? Is it possible that you missed the check-in time and they removed you from the flight for that reason?
I got there early so I could try and get an earlier flight but she said that flight was canceled. And then she looked in the computer and said it looks like your flight canceled also, I was quite surprised by that since I didn't see anything on my phone I told her....that's where then she put me on a connecting flight from Chicago to Tucson Arizona. I was literally there about 7 hours before my flight was to leave.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#24
I got there early so I could try and get an earlier flight but she said that flight was canceled. And then she looked in the computer and said it looks like your flight canceled also, I was quite surprised by that since I didn't see anything on my phone I told her....that's where then she put me on a connecting flight from Chicago to Tucson Arizona. I was literally there about 7 hours before my flight was to leave.
What time where you told it was cancelled? I have a suspicion as to what happened
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#26
I got there about 715am, what do you think that happened?
This is assuming you were booked on AA 2368

AA2368 is a flight that goes from Dallas to Baltimore and back to Dallas — all the same flight number — the plane stays in BWI for an hour before leaving back to Dallas.

So on the 14th:

AA 2368 from Dallas to BWI departure is cancelled. Likely cancelled early.

Which means oops what plane will be used for

AA2368 from BWI to Dallas.

So you being very early and asking the person looks at the screen and sees cancelled — no idea if a plane can be found — so reroute

Meanwhile plane is found and the AA 2368 BWI to DFW goes out as scheduled.

And you are stuck in a winter storm in Chicago.
 
May 10, 2019
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#27
This is assuming you were booked on AA 2368

AA2368 is a flight that goes from Dallas to Baltimore and back to Dallas — all the same flight number — the plane stays in BWI for an hour before leaving back to Dallas.

So on the 14th:

AA 2368 from Dallas to BWI departure is cancelled. Likely cancelled early.

Which means oops what plane will be used for

AA2368 from BWI to Dallas.

So you being very early and asking the person looks at the screen and sees cancelled — no idea if a plane can be found — so reroute

Meanwhile plane is found and the AA 2368 BWI to DFW goes out as scheduled.

And you are stuck in a winter storm in Chicago.
This is assuming you were booked on AA 2368

AA2368 is a flight that goes from Dallas to Baltimore and back to Dallas — all the same flight number — the plane stays in BWI for an hour before leaving back to Dallas.

So on the 14th:

AA 2368 from Dallas to BWI departure is cancelled. Likely cancelled early.

Which means oops what plane will be used for

AA2368 from BWI to Dallas.

So you being very early and asking the person looks at the screen and sees cancelled — no idea if a plane can be found — so reroute

Meanwhile plane is found and the AA 2368 BWI to DFW goes out as scheduled.

And you are stuck in a winter storm in Chicago.
that's so frustrating hearing this. I've gone to the aviation consumer protection also the better business bureau which have all told me that they cannot help me. I'm at ends meat here, and I feel like I have been wronged. I feel passionate about this situation, and I will not let it rest until I have been compensated for my troubles!! Where do I go from here?
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
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#30
You can contact AA: https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/american-airlines/
However, you need to keep your expectations and requests VERY low. AA has by far the highest number of cases on these forums; more than UA, DL and SW combined. Their lack of customer service is legendary, in the worst way.

Email a very concise bulleted point list to customer service, starting with ONLY the first person on the list above. Repeat weekly if no/negative response. Do not attach anything to your emails. Make sure the flight times and numbers are correct.

They may offer you some miles or credit for future flights. Regardless of the way things worked out there were major weather issues involved on that day that were not the fault of AA.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
May 10, 2019
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#31
You can contact AA: https://www.elliott.org/company-contacts/american-airlines/
However, you need to keep your expectations and requests VERY low. AA has by far the highest number of cases on these forums; more than UA, DL and SW combined. Their lack of customer service is legendary, in the worst way.

Email a very concise bulleted point list to customer service, starting with ONLY the first person on the list above. Repeat weekly if no/negative response. Do not attach anything to your emails. Make sure the flight times and numbers are correct.

They may offer you some miles or credit for future flights. Regardless of the way things worked out there were major weather issues involved on that day that were not the fault of AA.
I'm not blaming the weather issue on American airlines, I'm blaming thale misinformation that I receive from their representative which told me that my flight was canceled, when it was not canceled. If it wasn't for that representative I would have been at my location two days beforehand and not have to spend any money on hotels, food and taxi.
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
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#33
I'm not blaming the weather issue on American airlines, I'm blaming thale misinformation that I receive from their representative which told me that my flight was canceled, when it was not canceled. If it wasn't for that representative I would have been at my location two days beforehand and not have to spend any money on hotels, food and taxi.
You can raise that with AA but you should not expect reimbursement for your expenses or time lost. They just do not do that. If you ask for all that you will likely be ignored and get nothing.
 
May 7, 2019
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#34
I agree with most everyone here that our OP needs to keep his compensation expectations in check. But...

AA’s agent misrepresented that his flight had been canceled; it had not. This misrepresentation caused all his problems. I’m not sure what sufficient compensation is for this misrepresentation, but 5,000 miles most certainly is not it.

The AA agent’s lie — let’s call it what it was — had nothing whatsoever to do with the weather. I strenuously disagree with comments here suggesting that our OP should just accept the fact of AA’s lie. This is the current problem in our world. Lies told by our top business people and politicians are fast becoming accepted as the ordinary course of business. They most certainly are not that, and we must never as a society allow them to become that. End of...
 
Likes: California

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
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Maui Hawaii
#35
I agree with most everyone here that our OP needs to keep his compensation expectations in check. But...

AA’s agent misrepresented that his flight had been canceled; it had not. This misrepresentation caused all his problems. I’m not sure what sufficient compensation is for this misrepresentation, but 5,000 miles most certainly is not it.

The AA agent’s lie — let’s call it what it was — had nothing whatsoever to do with the weather. I strenuously disagree with comments here suggesting that our OP should just accept the fact of AA’s lie. This is the current problem in our world. Lies told by our top business people and politicians are fast becoming accepted as the ordinary course of business. They most certainly are not that, and we must never as a society allow them to become that. End of...
The AA agent was looking at the projected cancellations. This is not a "lie". Calling it a lie will guarantee that the OP will get absolutely nothing. The FAA has become very proactive in cancelling flights into predicted weather events so the airlines do not have dozens of planes stranded at snowed-in airports, causing a cascade of future cancellations. He was unlucky, but this happened for a good reason. Some travellers are adversely affected by these advance plans but many are helped by the proactive cancellations. Weather prediction remains an inexact science; it is better to err on the side of caution. Everybody does not have a good outcome, but the majority does.
 
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May 7, 2019
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#36
The AA agent was looking at “projected cancellations?” Exactly how do you know this? The flight had not been cancelled, right? Please identify the AA policy — if one exists — to notify passengers that a flight has been cancelled when the flight has not actually been cancelled.

I certainly do not suggest that our OP should tell AA he is asking for compensation because its agent lied. What I am suggesting is that the agent told our OP that his flight had been cancelled, when it hadn’t been, and that was — in fact — untrue. Whether the flight appeared on a purported “projected cancellations” list or not, what AA’s agent told our OP (that his flight had actually been cancelled) was untrue, and that untruth was the source of all of the inconveniences that our OP suffered.

I do not know what the appropriate compensation is for the AA agent’s lie to our OP, but I do know that 5,000 miles is definitely not it.
 

weihlac

Verified Member
Jun 30, 2017
1,420
1,391
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Maui Hawaii
#37
The AA agent was looking at “projected cancellations?” Exactly how do you know this? The flight had not been cancelled, right? Please identify the AA policy — if one exists — to notify passengers that a flight has been cancelled when the flight has not actually been cancelled.

I certainly do not suggest that our OP should tell AA he is asking for compensation because its agent lied. What I am suggesting is that the agent told our OP that his flight had been cancelled, when it hadn’t been, and that was — in fact — untrue. Whether the flight appeared on a purported “projected cancellations” list or not, what AA’s agent told our OP (that his flight had actually been cancelled) was untrue, and that untruth was the source of all of the inconveniences that our OP suffered.

I do not know what the appropriate compensation is for the AA agent’s lie to our OP, but I do know that 5,000 miles is definitely not it.
Read post #26. End of..............
 
Dec 19, 2014
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#40
Implying that the agent "lied" is a pretty strong and baseless accusation. As @Christina H wrote in post #26, this is a possible scenario and it is quite possible that the agent acted in good faith to try to get the OP to his final destination. So, can we stop with the posts that saying the agent lied/misinformation/etc?

Hindsight is always 20/20. What if the flight indeed was cancelled and the OP could not be re-routed? Then there would be insinuations that AA wasn't being proactive enough.

No one knows what really went through the agent's mind, but it is quite possible that the agent acted in good faith, based on the information at hand in making the recommendation to reroute through ORD. Had the flight through ORD gone without any problems, this conversation would not exist.
 
Likes: Neil Maley