Amazon Closed My Buyer Account With $1503 Gift Card Balance

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Sep 19, 2015
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#21
Cell phones are often classified as dangerous goods because of the battery and these have to be specially shipped, and ordering three at once?

And a shipping address to Nigeria, from someone in the US, is bound to raise suspicions.

Nigeria has a strong black market for cell phones.

Do you know the recipient? Have you ever been to Nigeria? Do you think it is possible that the recipient has had accounts closed or their address has been the recipient of overseas orders?

You can try small claims court, or continue to try to work with amazon, or arbitration. Those are the only options
 

Neil Maley

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#22
Nigeria is famous for internet scams. That’s the number one country associated with scams. The more you are telling us, the more I can see red flags

Do you live in the US?

We really can’t give you any more help with this. You may have to retain an attorney to help or go to Small Claims Court.
 
Aug 16, 2018
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#24
Everything about this transaction is suspicious, from the way the cards were purchased through your communication via non-verifiable means to shipping goods to Nigeria. Given the steps you've already taken, I think it's unlikely you will make any progress with Amazon.

However, suspicion is not proof. Assuming you've been honest with Amazon about everything (including your name and address when you set up the account), it's time to appeal to a third party. Amazon's gift card agreement (https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=3122091) allows you to appeal their decisions to either binding arbitration or small claims court. The instructions for how to do this are in the agreement. If you choose arbitration, Amazon will pay the fees unless your claim is frivolous.
I don't understand your perspectives over this to have said everything about it is suspicious because the gift card were legally purchased with cash so how on earth is that a suspicious activity when I didn't bought them on cardpool or any other online service. Does buying a gift card in a store now a suspicious activity or what exactly are you referring to?
Amazon don't ask for address while setting up an account unless you make use of debit or credit card on your account then you will be asked to provide billing address where by I always make use of gift card so nothing like billing information unless the account I shipped to
 
Aug 16, 2018
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#25
Nigeria is famous for internet scams. That’s the number one country associated with scams. The more you are telling us, the more I can see red flags

Do you live in the US?

We really can’t give you any more help with this. You may have to retain an attorney to help or go to Small Claims Court.
Yes, Alvin Texas.
Like I said I already file a complaint with ATG of washington and also Texas, FTC and also BBB and they are still on process but I came here due to the fact that you had success with thripp and also another user who is having up to $12,000 on her gift card balance so then I decided to give it a shot as well
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#26
I don't understand your perspectives over this to have said everything about it is suspicious because the gift card were legally purchased with cash so how on earth is that a suspicious activity when I didn't bought them on cardpool or any other online service. Does buying a gift card in a store now a suspicious activity or what exactly are you referring to?
Amazon don't ask for address while setting up an account unless you make use of debit or credit card on your account then you will be asked to provide billing address where by I always make use of gift card so nothing like billing information unless the account I shipped to
The perspective is from the merchant -- gift cards are used for money laundering. No one here is saying that you did that, but from Amazon's point of view......

Do you actually know the recipient, have you been to Nigeria, is there anyway to show a legitimate relationship with the recipient or country?
 
Apr 3, 2016
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#27
I once choose Ricky Mayne to register on here but I dont know why my registration was declined and that's the reason why I go by the name Charles W[Wallace]
I am trying to ship the phone to an international address but I have also shipped to an US address which is the first address ever added to my account.
The cost of shipping internationally is what made me bought that amount of a gift card and I have three past history on my account
Does Amazon even have your actual name? I would think if Ricky Mayne did not go through on the forums, you would use Richard Mayne or Ricky M, not a totally different name (Who is Charles Wallace?). Even something like using a totally different name can raise suspicions.
 
Aug 16, 2018
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#28
Does Amazon even have your actual name? I would think if Ricky Mayne did not go through on the forums, you would use Richard Mayne or Ricky M, not a totally different name (Who is Charles Wallace?). Even something like using a totally different name can raise suspicions.
Amazon has my name as RICKY MAYNE and that's the name on my profile ......
 
Aug 16, 2018
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#29
The perspective is from the merchant -- gift cards are used for money laundering. No one here is saying that you did that, but from Amazon's point of view......

Do you actually know the recipient, have you been to Nigeria, is there anyway to show a legitimate relationship with the recipient or country?
But sorry, I don't know of any amazon rules that restrict us from sending things to a place you've never been so just because I haven't been to somewhere does not give me the right to send thing to the region? That doesn't sound anyway right
 
Jul 27, 2016
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#30
I think the OP actually is Nigerian, since a quick Google of his email address shows a hit on a Nigerian social networking site.

Ricky, it seems like there's a lot that's only now coming out in this thread.

Can you be clear on a few things:

1. Is Ricky (or Richard) Mayne your legal name?
2. Do you actually live in the United States?
3. If the answer to #2 is yes, were the previous Amazon orders you placed sent to your home address in the US?
4. Why did you give Amazon a Google Voice number, rather than your actual cellphone number?
5. Did you physically purchase these 5 $300 gift cards yourself (i.e you walked into the store, laid down $1,500 in cash, and bought the cards? If not, who bought them?
6. If the answer to #4 is yes, where did the money come from? Was it yours, or did someone else give you the money?
7. To whom were you trying to send these phones? Why were you sending them over $1000 in electronics, rather than having them purchase it themselves?

I'm asking these questions because, if you do go the route of small claims court or arbitration, you'll need to have answers.
 
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Jul 27, 2016
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#31
Does Amazon even have your actual name? I would think if Ricky Mayne did not go through on the forums, you would use Richard Mayne or Ricky M, not a totally different name (Who is Charles Wallace?). Even something like using a totally different name can raise suspicions.
I assume Charles Wallace is a Wrinkle in Time reference...
 
Aug 16, 2018
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#32
If money laundering was my intention of getting the gift card I can get online and resold it if I dont need it or get to the store for cash back... The reason why I bought the gift card was to make use of it as a payment method when placing my order....They said gift card balance does not expire and its not transferable BUT CAN BE USED FOR PAYMENT ON PRODUCT EXCEPT FOR PAYMENT OF THE PURCHASE OF ANOTHER GIFT CARD....Here we are I didn't order any gift card but a product which is qualified of being paid for by a gift card.
If its not for their own selfish interest to put my account on hold , why didn't they locked me out of my account when redeeming those gift card since it wasn't just one single gift card worth of $1500 but rather they locked me out when I tried purchasing with the gift card and said they believe an unauthorized user access my account which I called the customer care and they ask for every details concerning my account, will an unauthorized user know all of it? I make the rep realize they should make thye account specialist get to know it was made by authorized user after confirming my identity as the rightful owner of the account so why didn't they take heed to that if truly they are protecting my account against fraud and also the last order I made which was cancelled which I ordered the rep to send me a confirmation email that my item will be shipped....Is that not worthy enough to make them be rest assured its an order placed by an authorize user? Amazon are only protecting their interest by holding unto gift card balance not protecting the interest of the user
 
Mar 14, 2018
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#33
I don't understand your perspectives over this to have said everything about it is suspicious because the gift card were legally purchased with cash so how on earth is that a suspicious activity when I didn't bought them on cardpool or any other online service. Does buying a gift card in a store now a suspicious activity or what exactly are you referring to?
Amazon don't ask for address while setting up an account unless you make use of debit or credit card on your account then you will be asked to provide billing address where by I always make use of gift card so nothing like billing information unless the account I shipped to

Amazon isn't worried about fraud--They're worried about money laundering. The US has strict rules for financial institutions that require them to keep records of cash transactions, verify customer identification and beneficial ownership and report suspicious activity. The goal is prevent criminals, kleptocrats, and others looking to hide ill-gotten proceeds from accessing the financial system anonymously. While Amazon isn't covered by these regulations, they do enforce policies to ensure they don't become a method to bypass the financial system.

So yes, buying gift cards with cash, depositing them into an unverified account and using the funds to ship goods to Nigeria is suspicious. And Amazon suspends these accounts to verify that nothing illegal is going on--not just to verify that the gift cards were purchased by you.

Again, if you weren't doing anything wrong you can recover your funds through arbitration or small claims court. But this will require you to establish that you are in fact "Ricky Mayne". If you opened the account under a different name you are probably out of luck.
 
Jul 27, 2016
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#34
But sorry, I don't know of any amazon rules that restrict us from sending things to a place you've never been so just because I haven't been to somewhere does not give me the right to send thing to the region? That doesn't sound anyway right
It's a question of the overall appearance. If you had a ten year account history with Amazon, had had a credit card on file all that time, and you'd bought a dozen or so items a year, all bought with that credit card, and mostly shipped to your billing address, with an occasional item sent to another address in the US or overseas, and then wanted to purchase an item with a price in line with what you'd spent in the past, and send it to an address in Nigeria, that wouldn't likely raise red flags. Amazon would know who you were, you'd have a track record with them, and the package for Nigeria, while a little unusual, wouldn't create a lot of concern. In this case, though, they have a very short history with you, they don't really know who you are or where you are (gmail account, Google voice number, no credit card on file), and you're sending a very valuable package to an address and person you've never used before (at least at Amazon), in a country that, fairly or not, has a reputation for scamming.

I can certainly see why Amazon would be wary. That said, if you've sent them scans of the gift cards, and the receipts which show that you paid cash for the cards, then, while Amazon doesn't have any obligation to complete your order, they can't just keep your money. As noted upthread, you may need to go the small claims route, or pursue arbitration, as the gift card agreement allows.
 
Aug 16, 2018
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#35
I think the OP actually is Nigerian, since a quick Google of his email address shows a hit on a Nigerian social networking site.

Ricky, it seems like there's a lot that's only now coming out in this thread.

Can you be clear on a few things:

1. Is Ricky (or Richard) Mayne your legal name?
2. Do you actually live in the United States?
3. If the answer to #2 is yes, were the previous Amazon orders you placed sent to your home address in the US?
4. Why did you give Amazon a Google Voice number, rather than your actual cellphone number?
5. Did you physically purchase these 5 $300 gift cards yourself (i.e you walked into the store, laid down $1,500 in cash, and bought the cards? If not, who bought them?
6. If the answer to #4 is yes, where did the money come from? Was it yours, or did someone else give you the money?
7. To whom were you trying to send these phones? Why were you sending them over $1000 in electronics, rather than having them purchase it themselves?

I'm asking these questions because, if you do go the route of small claims court or arbitration, you'll need to have answers.
Yes
Yes
yes
Because its for notifications of items shipped and not calling or so
YES from Kroger and walgreen $900 from kroger and $600 from walgreen
Legally mine
Sending them to a friend of mine
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
17,702
15,965
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#36
But sorry, I don't know of any amazon rules that restrict us from sending things to a place you've never been so just because I haven't been to somewhere does not give me the right to send thing to the region? That doesn't sound anyway right
They have rules on shipping to countries that have a high degree of fraud by Amazon shipping to Nigeria they risk a claim by you later that the item wasn’t received.

As JustAGuy says- if you had a long term account and were sending items all along- it probably wouldn’t draw a red flag. But suddenly buying a high dollar amount of gift cards and shipping high dollar value items to Nigeria where internet scams are plentiful- that’s an issue and Amazons rules state they can close your account.


Why didn’t you ship to yourself and you can ship it yourself?

I suggest that you perhaps write to the Attorney General in your State. Perhaps they can get the balance back for you.
 
Jul 27, 2016
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#37
My public service announcement, that I usually include in these threads: If you want to load cash into an Amazon account (rather than using a credit card), you can use Amazon Cash at a wide array of retail stores (CVS, 7-11, and many more). It's a better idea than buying Amazon gift cards at retail, since Amazon knows that they've got the money, and it removes the "were the gift cards stolen/bought with a cloned credit card" risk from the equation.

https://www.amazon.com/b?ie=UTF8&node=14583169011
 
Aug 16, 2018
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#38
Amazon isn't worried about fraud--They're worried about money laundering. The US has strict rules for financial institutions that require them to keep records of cash transactions, verify customer identification and beneficial ownership and report suspicious activity. The goal is prevent criminals, kleptocrats, and others looking to hide ill-gotten proceeds from accessing the financial system anonymously. While Amazon isn't covered by these regulations, they do enforce policies to ensure they don't become a method to bypass the financial system.

So yes, buying gift cards with cash, depositing them into an unverified account and using the funds to ship goods to Nigeria is suspicious. And Amazon suspends these accounts to verify that nothing illegal is going on--not just to verify that the gift cards were purchased by you.

Again, if you weren't doing anything wrong you can recover your funds through arbitration or small claims court. But this will require you to establish that you are in fact "Ricky Mayne". If you opened the account under a different name you are probably out of luck.
I opened the account under the name ricky mayne.... Why do you called it an unverified account?
 
Aug 16, 2018
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#39
They have rules on shipping to countries that have a high degree of fraud by Amazon shipping to Nigeria they risk a claim by you later that the item wasn’t received.

Why didn’t you ship to yourself and you can ship it yourself?
Due to information I could get the custom clearance fee is always too high compared to shipping directly with amazon which wont has anything to do with clearance fee
 
Feb 16, 2018
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#40
They are also worried you are an internet scammer. Scammers deceive victims into purchasing gift cards using cash, and then having the victim photograph the card and receipt and sending it to them. These scams have been largely popular with Nigerian scammers who use the internet.

Some of the signs of a scammer are:
1. Fake English sounding names
2. Use of free email accounts(gmail, yahoo, etc.)
3. Use of free internet phone systems
4. Names not matching up to other names used in scam
5. Large purchases using victim purchased gift cards, that are sent directly overseas

I think Amazon has made the right call here. If not, walk into your local police department and file a report with them, let us know what you find out.
 
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