Admitted fraud - PayPal and Chase won’t get money back

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Mar 23, 2015
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#41
Could be a bank hack, someone got hold of an old statement (hint shred everything old), many ways to get information.
My statements (in the OLD days when they came in paper form) only had the last 4 digits of my account and my routing number wasn't on there at all. It's just ODD that this scammer had SO much access to the OPs information. Makes me wonder if it's a disgruntled ex, a rogue family member, etc.. working with a friend or someone whose name the OP doesn't recognize. I hope it gets resolved! That's a lot of money gone through (seemingly) no fault of the OP.
 
Dec 3, 2018
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#42
I have emailed PayPal exec. on Tuesday, still no reaponse back. Plus, the supervisors at PayPal never called me back about the issues.
 
Dec 3, 2018
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#43
This is how fraud is done- they start with $1, looking to see if you notice (which you didn’t) and then go for the big one.

How was PayPal used to take the money from your Chase account? Is your savings account linked to a PayPsl account?

Did you notify them right away when the $1100 was taken? Whoever did this knew exactly what they were doing because they waited 60 days to do the second transaction.

You must file a police report and send the report number to PayPal and Chase.

How did you get the name of the person that took the money? Do you know this person?
I have never had a PayPal account before, someone got ahold of my savings account and opened one under their own name (which is how PayPal was able to give me the persons name, they said “you’re not ____ with the account number ____” and I was able to provide identification that that is not me. When I noticed the big amount was taken I called chase right away, then two days later I called PayPal because chase originally told me they would credit me then came back and said never mind you have to call PayPal. I have multiple times, now my calls are not being returned.
 
Jan 7, 2019
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#46
Folks, any update on this issue? Exactly the same thing happened to me, except the amount I was cheated off is much larger. I am currently in deep dispute with Chase but I realize that my chances on recovering the funds are slim
 
Dec 3, 2018
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#47
Hey Borisn,
Mine hasn't been resolved yet either. I even got in touch with Vickie from PayPal Exec who told me she would have a three-way phone call with chase and ensure the money is returned. A week later she just said I didn't mean that and that the only way I would get the money from them is if Chase writes a letter, which I called chase and they did send a letter on 12/21. I have called this Vickie lady three times now and she refuses to call me back.
 
Jan 7, 2019
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#48
Hey Borisn,
Mine hasn't been resolved yet either. I even got in touch with Vickie from PayPal Exec who told me she would have a three-way phone call with chase and ensure the money is returned. A week later she just said I didn't mean that and that the only way I would get the money from them is if Chase writes a letter, which I called chase and they did send a letter on 12/21. I have called this Vickie lady three times now and she refuses to call me back.
antone_s1, I am currently dealing with Chase executive office which told me that they "as a courtesy" try to recover the funds but do not guarantee anything. I take it that they would not do a thing. However, I am still trying to understand the mechanics of this fraud. Obviously, somebody got hold of my Chase account and attempted to add it as his own. In order to verify the account ownership, PayPal AFAIK ask you to perform 2 small transactions to the PayPal and then log in into Paypal to verify the amounts. In any case, both of these transactions should appear as deposits back to the bank account. If they don't, that may mean that the fraudster does not really have access to your account and can impersonate it. If they do, that means that the perp has access to the bank account and that is bank's security breach. In my case, I don't see the deposits - only 2 small unauthorized withdrawals. What do you see in your case? In any case, let's keep in touch since together we may be able to pressure Chase much more.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#49
I can't believe a woman of your banking/financial background doesn't shred her confidential stuff! Shame on you, JV, ten lashes with a wet noodle. @mmb, tell your kids who think you're OCD that you'll have the last laugh when you and I are standing alone on an island and everyone else has been swept away by the scammers. If we want to participate in the good parts of technology, we have to pay attention!
 
Dec 3, 2018
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#50
antone_s1, I am currently dealing with Chase executive office which told me that they "as a courtesy" try to recover the funds but do not guarantee anything. I take it that they would not do a thing. However, I am still trying to understand the mechanics of this fraud. Obviously, somebody got hold of my Chase account and attempted to add it as his own. In order to verify the account ownership, PayPal AFAIK ask you to perform 2 small transactions to the PayPal and then log in into Paypal to verify the amounts. In any case, both of these transactions should appear as deposits back to the bank account. If they don't, that may mean that the fraudster does not really have access to your account and can impersonate it. If they do, that means that the perp has access to the bank account and that is bank's security breach. In my case, I don't see the deposits - only 2 small unauthorized withdrawals. What do you see in your case? In any case, let's keep in touch since together we may be able to pressure Chase much more.

Yes I agree we should stay in touch on this one! Mine was a $1 transaction in August, and then exactly 60 days after day after day $20-$1000 were taken out paying/purchasing random things.
 
Dec 3, 2018
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#51
Yes I agree we should stay in touch on this one! Mine was a $1 transaction in August, and then exactly 60 days after day after day $20-$1000 were taken out paying/purchasing random things.
PayPal and Chase both verbally told me though that they never verified any identity either.
 
Jan 7, 2019
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#52
PayPal and Chase both verbally told me though that they never verified any identity either.
I spoke with payPal today. They told me that PayPal and Chase are using so called login verification system which essentially just requires the customer (the one who is attempting to add the bank account to payPal) to know username and password. I am not saying it is a laxed security per se but keep in mind that you cannot log in to Chase online just having this information from unknown computer. Looks like in this case this security featre does not prevent the perpetrator from verifying the bank account with PayPal. I'd say this is an enormous security breach which everyone should be aware of.
 

Neil Maley

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#53
The take away from this is to check your credit card, checking and savings statements monthly. With all the security breaches every time you turn around it is imperative that you go over your statements with a fine tooth comb.
 
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Jan 7, 2019
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#54
The take away from this is to check your credit card statements monthly. With all the security breaches every time you turn around it is imperative that you go over your statements with a fine tooth comb.
Neil, I mean no disrespect, but please pardon my frustration. Do you realize that the whole thread is talking about savings accounts, not credit card statements? In case you missed it, these are not the same. Do you check all your savings accounts to a dollar every month?
 
Mar 23, 2015
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#56
I spoke with payPal today. They told me that PayPal and Chase are using so called login verification system which essentially just requires the customer (the one who is attempting to add the bank account to payPal) to know username and password. I am not saying it is a laxed security per se but keep in mind that you cannot log in to Chase online just having this information from unknown computer. Looks like in this case this security featre does not prevent the perpetrator from verifying the bank account with PayPal. I'd say this is an enormous security breach which everyone should be aware of.
I find that very odd, as well. I have 2 Chase credit card accounts and everytime I log in from a device they don't know or if I've cleared my cookies, I have to use 2 FA to log in, including a texted code to my cell phone. So, how did these people log into anything??
 
Dec 3, 2018
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#57
I spoke with payPal today. They told me that PayPal and Chase are using so called login verification system which essentially just requires the customer (the one who is attempting to add the bank account to payPal) to know username and password. I am not saying it is a laxed security per se but keep in mind that you cannot log in to Chase online just having this information from unknown computer. Looks like in this case this security featre does not prevent the perpetrator from verifying the bank account with PayPal. I'd say this is an enormous security breach which everyone should be aware of.
Well for me I have it set up I get notifications from chase with big purchases or unrecognized. I never had a PayPal account and they were big purchases and there was no notification or verification.
 

mmb

Verified Member
Jan 20, 2015
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#58
Neil, I mean no disrespect, but please pardon my frustration. Do you realize that the whole thread is talking about savings accounts, not credit card statements? In case you missed it, these are not the same. Do you check all your savings accounts to a dollar every month?
YES!
And this is one of the reasons I still get paper statements mailed to me. It is a trigger for me to reconcile the account, I use Quickbooks. Otherwise, months could go by without me specifically looking at some accounts that are not used for bill paying.
 
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Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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#59
Well for me I have it set up I get notifications from chase with big purchases or unrecognized. I never had a PayPal account and they were big purchases and there was no notification or verification.
But the $1 transaction was the trigger and what criminals use to see if you notice money gone. So having it set up for only large transactions may not help. Reviewing your bank statements is the best way to make sure nothing is amiss.
 
Dec 3, 2018
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#60
But the $1 transaction was the trigger and what criminals use to see if you notice money gone. So having it set up for only large transactions may not help. Reviewing your bank statements is the best way to make sure nothing is amiss.
This is for my savings account, no purchases are made through this account. Thus, ANY changes I am notified/should be because for 16 years it’s only been me putting money in/taking money out and notifications for anything that happens with the account.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
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