2019 - 2029 Family Vacations

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Jun 11, 2018
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#1
Greetings,

I live in the US. I intend to plan several vacations (both National and International) for my two children (Boy: 16 years old / Girl: 12 years old) over a course of a decade (2019 - 2029) as of next year for trips (airlines / cruises / trains) that can combine geography, religion, politics, history, anthropology, art, culture, festivals, music, museum visits, foods, guided visits in one comfortable package. I would like to expose them to other cultures. I want this to be a transformative experience for them. Can someone explain to me the best way to proceed in an efficient and effective manner to define the priorities / create the awareness and game plan / while developing the appropriate considerations/ minimizing risk / to maximize my return towards such endeavor?

In the National arena, I would welcome certain landmarks to have them visited, Presidential libraries, and stuff on that nature---

Jacques ALBERT
A concerned Dad
 

technomage1

Verified Member
Jan 5, 2015
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#3
Hit up your local library for travel guides or videos or watch travel shows. I like Samatha Brown, personally but Rick Steves is good too. This will expose you to different areas. Honestly you're likely to get the package of exereinces you describe in nearly any country you go to, provided you hit the right areas, and the shows/guides will help. I would, however, recommend starting in the UK. The language barrier will be much less of an issue there, and it's a good place (IMO) to dip your toe into international travel.

As Neil noted, a good TA is gold when booking internationally. I do not recommend self booking, but if you are interested in entry requirements, immunizations, etc a great resrouce is www.travel.state.gov (assuming youre a US citizen)

To get you started, some great cities I've visted that combine all the above mentioned areas of interest:
London
Paris
Prague
Tokyo
Kyoto
Seoul
Beijing
Florence
Venice
Brussels
Cologne
Amsterdam
Munich
Edinburgh
Hong Kong

Others I haven't been to but heard are great:
Berlin
Barcelona
Dublin
Istanbul
St Petersburg
Saigon (Ho Chi Minh City)
Melbourne
Sydney
Vienna

And don't ignore the USA:
DC
NYC
Savannah
Charleston
Atlanta
Philadelphia
Boston
Hampton Roads, VA

Of course there are many more, too.
 
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johnbaker

Verified Member
Oct 2, 2014
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@Jacques ALBERT If it was me, I'd start with a list of experiences that meet your goals in areas you know well. That way when you talk to a TA it will better help define what you are looking for. "geography, religion, politics, history, anthropology, art, culture, festivals, music, museum visits, foods, guided visits" all mean different things to different people. Having a list of things that would meet you goals and then project them on to your destinations would help someone match your goals to a given itinerary.

Edit: one additional note... I'd use the same person to plan all of them and plan each one, one at a time. That way, the two of you learn each others "language" and each consecutive trip gets closer to your exact goal.
 
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Oct 13, 2015
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These don't tick many of your boxes but in the interest of education, consider visiting Glacier National Park before the glaciers shrink much further and the Great Barrier Reef before it gets too bleached. I'll be visiting Glacier for the first time next month so I have no personal experience but I've been to the Great Barrier Reef and it's definitely worth seeing, especially if you combine it with a trip to Sydney.
 
Likes: jsn55

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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San Francisco
#8
Greetings,

I live in the US. I intend to plan several vacations (both National and International) for my two children (Boy: 16 years old / Girl: 12 years old) over a course of a decade (2019 - 2029) as of next year for trips (airlines / cruises / trains) that can combine geography, religion, politics, history, anthropology, art, culture, festivals, music, museum visits, foods, guided visits in one comfortable package. I would like to expose them to other cultures. I want this to be a transformative experience for them. Can someone explain to me the best way to proceed in an efficient and effective manner to define the priorities / create the awareness and game plan / while developing the appropriate considerations/ minimizing risk / to maximize my return towards such endeavor?

In the National arena, I would welcome certain landmarks to have them visited, Presidential libraries, and stuff on that nature---

Jacques ALBERT
A concerned Dad
What a wonderful Dad you are! I would involve the kids from the beginning in researching and picking destinations. The journeys should be a good balance of educational/inspirational and just plain fun. The age disparity is just enough so each of them will be interested in different things. Make dates to spend a couple hours in the local library every week. In addition to the excellent travel books most libraries carry, they should have "coffee table books" as well which are full of gorgeous photos and will be inspiring. Each of you should make his/her own list of places, then get together to compare and rank them. Libraries often have good video selections, often quite dated but good for background information. The internet, of course, is chock full of billions of bits of information. The three of you can have a monthly dinner to report on your findings and make the plans. I would research large hotel chains and establish one or two with lots of hotels at various price-ranges. You can join their loyalty programs and pick up some perks along the way. I always joke that I sleep at a Holiday Inn Express but use my points at the InterContinental.

I would start in Washington DC. I've been all over the world, but DC is probably the most tourist-friendly place I've visited. I could spend a month there. Since I never got more than a hundred miles from home until I was 17, I really appreciate what you're setting up for your kids.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#9
Part of the challenge will be finding locations that interest the children. Some kids do not last long in large museums, others love it.

Of course one should consider safety. I would go to Istanbul but not to Diyarkabir. Parts of Western Turkey are amazing, like Pummakale, Ephesus and such.

Wherever one goes one should learn about local customs and be respectful. I have seen tourists get angry when they are not allowed into St. Peter’s by the Vatican clothes police — ok not clothes police but security. Same problem with the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

Think of smaller cities, such as Toledo when visiting Madrid. They often are not over run by multinational retail which makes too many cities look alike. Granada is fascinating for the Alhambra and the history of the Moors in Spain.

Cartagena is beautiful and can be combined with a trip to Bogota. Cartagena is humid and tropical and a short flight from the more mountainous Bogota. It is fairly safe to travel to Colombia. Cartagena has the interesting Palace of the Inquisition.
 

technomage1

Verified Member
Jan 5, 2015
2,001
3,417
113
#10
Part of the challenge will be finding locations that interest the children. Some kids do not last long in large museums, others love it.

Of course one should consider safety. I would go to Istanbul but not to Diyarkabir. Parts of Western Turkey are amazing, like Pummakale, Ephesus and such.

Wherever one goes one should learn about local customs and be respectful. I have seen tourists get angry when they are not allowed into St. Peter’s by the Vatican clothes police — ok not clothes police but security. Same problem with the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

Think of smaller cities, such as Toledo when visiting Madrid. They often are not over run by multinational retail which makes too many cities look alike. Granada is fascinating for the Alhambra and the history of the Moors in Spain.

Cartagena is beautiful and can be combined with a trip to Bogota. Cartagena is humid and tropical and a short flight from the more mountainous Bogota. It is fairly safe to travel to Colombia. Cartagena has the interesting Palace of the Inquisition.
I used to wear these shorts where the legs would zip on and off as needed while travelling to such areas. Zip legs on for churches, unzip off when done. A collared shirt such as a polo is pretty standard too.
 
Jun 11, 2018
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#12
I'm humbled by all the great answers and tips I received from all of you. I will start incorporating them in my plan and get the kids input as well to make sure they contribute their opinions in this endeavor. I think this forum has generous, genuine members who share their experiences.
 
Likes: Neil Maley

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
7,009
6,872
113
San Francisco
#13
I'm humbled by all the great answers and tips I received from all of you. I will start incorporating them in my plan and get the kids input as well to make sure they contribute their opinions in this endeavor. I think this forum has generous, genuine members who share their experiences.
Well, haven't you just made our day, Jacques! We are all volunteers who work hard because we care ... and it's so nice to hear your appreciation. Thanks! Besides ... it's great fun to work on a positive post; makes a nice change for us, employs our creative juices.
 
Sep 9, 2014
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While Paris, Venice and the like are fine for Culture, you have an opportunity for life-long learning and a fuller understanding of the world. Change the lives of your children. Let them experience a truly different culture and set of circumstances: Burkina Faso, The Gambia, Gabon, parts of Niger, Benin, Togo, Cote d’Ivoire, all reasonably safe. Within the United States, consider places where people hold different people logical views than your own, whether Berkeley or West Virginia. Different flavors of the same ol’ (London versus New York) doesn’t bring the value of something truly different.
 
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Likes: krisseye
Jun 11, 2018
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365RoadWarrior I agree with you a 1000 percent: a reasonable outlook on an ever-rapidly changing world. I really like the ENERGY coming from this site especially in these days and ages. It's a privilege.
 
Likes: krisseye