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Traffic Ticket in Spain 5 Months Ago

Discussion in 'Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)' started by Bud, Jan 14, 2016.

  1. Bud

    Bud

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    I was in Spain on 8/16/15 around the city Tarragonia. In late Sept.-early Oct. I received a credit card charge from Hertz for $46.25 to look up and furnish my name to Spanish authorities. Shortly thereafter my credit card was charged for $6.96 for some violation at about 5 PM. The information was in Spanish and I was in the town at that time so I figured that it was not worth questioning for $6.96.

    Yesterday, I received a letter (almost 5 months after the trip) saying that I owed 100 euro (which would be reduced to 50 euro) for driving 87.9 KM/H in a 70 KM/H zone at 5:04 PM. At about that time I was in the city traffic close to pulling into my hotel parking lot. I do not think one could go that fast (about 55 MPH) under those conditions but I cannot prove it. Does anyone know what my options are? How do I proceed?

    For the record, I have not had a traffic ticket in the US in about 15 -20 years.
    Thank you.
     
    #1
  2. rbrunson

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    I am more shocked that Hertz charged you to give your name to the Spanish authorities, especially since they have all that information from the rental records.

    Spain, like much of Europe, has plenty of speed cameras and fighting the ticket is not usually worth the cost & aggravation, especially since by your own admission, you cannot disprove it.
     
    #2
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  3. Realitoes

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    Been there, done that! I believe almost all rental agencies will charge a fee to pass your name and address to the authorities so they can send you the ticket. Avis and Sixt charged me both times I received one.

    Spain, like most of Europe, normally uses speed camera's, and the documentation you received should have had a photo with a date/time stamp along with the speed violation. If you plan to go to Europe in the future, I would just go ahead and pay it so there would be no unexpected issues. Normally if you pay it within so many days, they knock off 50%. If you appeal, you will have to waive the 50% reduction.

    Here is a quick link (for Spain) in English how to appeal/pay the fine:
    https://sede.dgt.gob.es/es/tramites-y-multas/alguna-multa-en/
     
    #3
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2016
    AngelS, kenish, Kitkat and 2 others like this.
  4. cp556

    cp556 Moderator
    Staff Member Advocate

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    Mighty impressive answer, @Realitoes .
     
    #4
    AngelS likes this.
  5. jsn55

    Staff Member Advocate

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    It seems that European tourist areas have figured out how much money they can generate by sending tickets to travellers ... travellers who are in their country spending money. All the rental companies charge a fee to look up your information and pass it on. Whether you pay the ticket or ignore it depends on whether you plan on travelling back to that country and renting a car. My stance is that if a country is so dumb that they want a hundred euro from me for an illegal u-turn, I'll just spend my vacation dollars elsewhere.
     
    #5
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  6. kenish

    Staff Member Advocate

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    As far as I know, automated enforcement in Europe doesn't single out tourists. Ask any UK resident what a "gatso" is! Or do you feel that tourists should be able to flout laws of the country they're visiting and get a hall pass because they're spending tourists dollars? And if you're visiting a country one time only, go ahead and break their laws because they can't collect? This is "ugly American" attitude to the max....I guess you're OK with foreign visitors to your city breaking laws with abandon?
     
    #6
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