tips for dock workers

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Dec 27, 2014
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#1
I wish to pass on something that needs to be told, ESPECIALLY IF YOU OR FRIENDS
GO ON CRUISE SHIPS.
When passengers arrive at the ships dock, they encounter union longshoremen,
whose job (for which they are well paid, with benefits) is only to place your baggage on
rolling racks that roll to the ship. Your cabin attendant then takes your bags to your cabin.
Here's the rub: Those longshoremen LIE to you when they say they will take good care of
your luggage and take it to your cabin. They further intimidate the passengers by saying
they need some compensation to assure them nothing will happen to their luggage, i.e., a TIP.
As cruise passengers know, all gratuities are automatically included in their final bill from
the cruise line. DO NOT BE INTIMIDATED BY THEIR TACTICS.. DO NOT BE AFRAID
OF DAMAGE TO YOU BAGS. Cameras are everywhere. Tell security if you feel threatened.
( This occurs at all cruise lines,)

This is from another source:
Miami: The porter or longshoreman said "You better tip me if you want to see your bags on the ship".

Canaveral: Saw many signs posted in the loading area that read: "Porters are paid a salary. Tips are strictly optional." No one ever approached and asked for a dime.

I must say, I was very surprised by the rude response in Miami. I felt I was polite and was going to give him a tip anyway, but that experience did change my perception. It's not like my waiter at a restaurants says that I better tip him or he'll spit in my food.

__________________
Explorer of the Seas 02/06/2005, 05/09/2008
Liberty of the Seas 07/19/2008
Freedom of the Seas 09/19/2010
Oasis of the Seas 12/15/201
 
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Sep 22, 2014
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#2
Hi Richard
Welcome to the Elliott Forums. The Cruising Forum(s) are set up with an Overview "Cruising" Forum and (so far) three Sub Forums (NCL, Carnival & Royal Caribbean). Your post is instructive and informative for all cruise lines and probably deserved more wide spread disemination. But, since we just getting up and running (and getting the kinks & gremlins out) I'm sure everyone checking out Cruising will find your post.

Whenever the subject of tipping is raised, it seems to be the 3rd rail in the old adage: "Never discuss religion, politics, or tipping" :)

Actually, tipping is such a personal thing that what motivates different people to tip or not tip are as varied as the there are personalities. Many folks who ever worked as a waiter or bar tender will tip anyone who provides any service. Then there was my life long mentor from my coming of age years who wrote: "The world is made up of two kinds of people: toters & tippers. Until 50 you're strong enough to tote, after 50 you should become a tipper." :D

But, one thing rings loud a clear and is the message of your post: No one should allow themselves to be intimidated into tipping. That is extortion.

Thank you for your observations and great advice.

John
 
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bodega3

Guest
#3
While I am not a fan of tipping, if you use their service, a tip isn't unusual. They do not take your luggage to your cabin. You can avoid them buy packing less and taking a smaller piece of luggage so you can take it onboard through security yourself. The tipping you have on your account onboard does not got to the porters onshore, just like the Skycaps at the airport.
 
Likes: Traveler

Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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#4
You are correct in the fact that tipping is optional and you should not feel like you are forced to tip anyone. The porters at the pier take your luggage to be loaded on the ship only. I actually value the porters AFTER the cruise who help get your bags to your point of pick up. They often can get you out of the ship terminal faster than if you were on your own and I find those tips well worth it.
 
Dec 29, 2014
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#5
While I am not a fan of tipping, if you use their service, a tip isn't unusual. They do not take your luggage to your cabin. You can avoid them buy packing less and taking a smaller piece of luggage so you can take it onboard through security yourself. The tipping you have on your account onboard does not got to the porters onshore, just like the Skycaps at the airport.
Not every cruise will allow you to take your bags on-board unless they are the "airline carry-on" size.
 
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bodega3

Guest
#6
It has to be able to go through the xray machine. Pack light...I did and took mine two bags on board with me.
 
Dec 27, 2014
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#7
As great as the advice is to take your bag as carry-on, that's not realistic. The cruises that I've been on have similar rules to airlines, and the bags must be basically backpack sized in order to be carried on.

The length of the cruise also dictates how big of a bag you're likely to have. While a 3-night cruise might fit into carry-on sized bags, a week-long or more usually takes at least one full dufflebag. Time of year also has an impact. Traveling in winter (or maybe an Alaskan cruise) will find people packing more, weightier clothes. Jeans and hoodies take up a lot more space in a bag than tank tops, shorts, and flip flops.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Jan 6, 2015
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#8
As great as the advice is to take your bag as carry-on, that's not realistic. The cruises that I've been on have similar rules to airlines, and the bags must be basically backpack sized in order to be carried on.

The length of the cruise also dictates how big of a bag you're likely to have. While a 3-night cruise might fit into carry-on sized bags, a week-long or more usually takes at least one full dufflebag. Time of year also has an impact. Traveling in winter (or maybe an Alaskan cruise) will find people packing more, weightier clothes. Jeans and hoodies take up a lot more space in a bag than tank tops, shorts, and flip flops.
Monica, we have cruised three (3) times now, each one a 7 day cruise, including Alaska. And we have been successful with just one carry-on size bag. For us, it came down to addition-by-subtraction. In my case, I took with me pre-packaged t-shirts with pockets (all rolled up). As little as they cost, I could and did put them in the trash so I didn't have to fold and carry them back with me. Not fancy, of course, but we were there to enjoy not to impress. Of course that doesn't work for everyone.

And my spouse has taught me the value of hand washing clothes in the sink and hanging them to dry. You can also purchase clothing at most stops at a low cost ($10-$15 for a shirt/blouse). So there are creative ways to avoid cruising with a lot of luggage, if you do not wish to lug around large pieces.

Finally I respect your experiences with cruise lines and luggage, but we have yet to see that on our trips. Many had large pieces of luggage.
 
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bodega3

Guest
#9
It can be done and has been done. Just depends on your packing needs. I took two roll on carry on bags. Very easy, as I wash my clothes out everynight, so not a lot of packing involved. So if you want to, you can do it. Just a matter of preference.
 
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Neil Maley

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Dec 27, 2014
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#10
That is all fine and dandy but the original post has to do with checked bags, not roll on. As a veteran of more than 20 cruises, I have never been able to pack everything in roll ons. And I opt to tip the dock workers but it is a personal choice.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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San Francisco
#11
I've not had the experience of being pushed toward a tip either boarding or disembarking. While travelling, I tip anyone who performs an added service for me; I'm always dressed well so maybe they give me good service because I look like I'll tip well. On the other hand, I tip nobody who is just doing their job. Sincere thanks and a smile is all that's needed.
 
#12
I have had the experience of longshoremen with their hand out at the Carnival L.A. dock and I fell for it. THANKS FOR REMINDING ME that they probably make as much as I do before the tips. I won't do that again.

I also tipped the porter who took our luggage from the place where it was dropped off to the car, half-a-mile away. They probably earned it.