1. Hi Guest, welcome to the help forum. You can get fast answers to your customer service questions here. We have a dedicated team of advocates who are ready to help. Just go to the section that matches your question and ask us!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. If you've posted a question or issue for our advocates to assist with, please be sure to check back frequently for responses and requests for clarification.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Did you know you can get email notifications when something new posts to your favorite forum? It's easy. Just click the "watch" link right next to the "post new thread" button at the top of your favorite forum. The rest is easy. Now you'll never miss another conversation.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Want to become an expert user? Drop by the How to use this forum section and all will be revealed. We'll show you how to make the most of your experience.
    Dismiss Notice

Questions regarding tipping

Discussion in 'Other' started by Debi, Jun 18, 2016.

  1. Debi

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    I was recently in Japan where NO TIPPING is the rule. The service I received was AMAZING! It really opened my eyes.
    I always question the maid tipping. My issue relates to overnights; is it necessary to tip? I get a clean room which I pay for but the maid does nothing for me.
    On longer stays, I also question what constitutes good maid service. I hate having the bed unmade and am annoyed when the maid doesn't come until late afternoon. This is annoying when I am working in the room. I am also annoyed when I have been out of the room all day but the room is not made up when I return. I get frustrated when all my stuff is moved where "they" want it instead of leaving it where I prefer. Finally, I feel I pay for each night but often the room amenities are not replenished.
    Then, the question of when to tip arises. If I am staying for an extended visit, I often give a tip on arrival to ensure service. This backfires when there are different maids each day. And, when I have had different maids each day, how do I tip? If I leave it in the room does it get split by all maids? If I give the tip to one maid, does it get split?
    I've held many hotel jobs but never in Housekeeping so I'm uncertain of the wage situation for maids. I was front desk and know I was paid well. Similarly, in banquet (both as a waitress and booking/billing) I was appropriately paid. Even as a restaurant or banquet hostess I was fairly paid. The only jobs I worked that were paid low wages were room service and restaurant waitress so I always tip well for good service from these employees but now-a-days I question if the tips are split--I want my service provider to receive the tips I give! Furthermore, since the restaurants cannot operate without a wait staff, why has it become the norm for the guest to pay them tips instead of the owner paying them a fair wage?
    And, the concierge; it is my understanding these positions are well paid. I understand the appropriateness of a tip for going above-and-beyond to help a guest but now it seems that some expect a tip for simply giving out the "free" IN, WHERE or CITI-GUIDE magazines or opening a map to show the location of a restaurant or site.
    Add the bag handlers on arrival . . . I have to lug my suitcase everywhere else, I don't want to have it wrestled from me for the short trip to the desk. And, I don't like having it sent to the room; it almost always takes too long and I feel obligated to tip for a "service" that is a dis-service to me.
    Then we have the cab "hailers"; if it is raining and they chase down a cab I am happy to tip but when the cabs are lined up on a clear day and all they do is open the door, REALLY??? Again, I don't know how they are paid.
    Then we get to cabs--used to be a buck was appropriate for "in-town" (short) trips; now the credit card slip "suggests" up to a 30% tip??? What are cab drivers paid? And again, what constitutes good service?
    I worked at a restaurant from 4pm-2am and was paid $5 when the "suggested" tip rate was only 10%; you can be sure that I WORKED for those tips and EARNED every penny. I have always advocated for tips until I receive SUCH GREAT SERVICE with NO TIPPING ALLOWED in Japan. Then, I read Chris' recent article and it really raised some questions which I hope the forum can help to answer. Tips are the norm in the US and having worked for tips, I want to be fair but I do feel that things have gotten a bit out of hand.
     
    #1
  2. AAGK

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2015
    Messages:
    3,667
    Likes Received:
    2,819
    You raise very practical and potentially awkward/embarrassing issues. This is such a good question. When staying at a no tipping place, assume the tip is factored into the cost, however I always add extra. Whether it is a little or a lot depends on whether I received exemplary service. When I check out, I leave an envelope of cash with the front desk for the folks I found helpful. I may say, tip all the cleaners but Mary and Susan were particularly good so give them more. Then I pass the burden onto them.
    With housekeeping, we have all had that annoying moment when they knock on the door every hour and you say come back, then when you leave, they don't come by. There are practical reasons for this. The cleaners have to get to every room on a shift and can only spend a certain amount of time there to complete their tasks. Since this is a service business and the guest should be accommodated, there is a built in obstacle to sucess for these, usually, women. I try to make it somewhat easier by putting the do not disturb on while I'm in there and then calling down when I leave to let them know it's a good time to come by. I also will just pop into the hall and let the cleaner know directly.
     
    #2
  3. jsn55

    Staff Member Advocate

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2014
    Messages:
    4,459
    Likes Received:
    4,309
    I grew up in a rural community and barely knew what a tip was until my mid-20's. My husband grew up in NYC, so imagine the discussions we have had about tipping over the years.

    I've tried to figure out a plan, based on customs and extra service. I always tip well for extra service. I don't tip someone who is just doing their job, such as cleaning my hotel room, answering a question or driving me somewhere. If a taxi driver loads and unloads my luggage and is polite, I tip. I do tip servers, bartenders, hairdressers, airport shuttle drivers and others because, traditionally, their compensation factors in tips. If a porter delivers my bag quickly, there's a tip. If a server does a terrible job, I don't tip. This plan works for me; I never feel guilty for not tipping nor pressured for a tip. I always tip in cash, and hand it to the person who has done the service.
     
    #3
    Mandy_Elaine likes this.
  4. Algebralovr

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2015
    Messages:
    389
    Likes Received:
    572
    I hate our tipping culture. I would prefer to simply pay a fair wage and stop this still tipping business.

    As for hotel maid service, unless I request something or leave a mess, I don't leave a tip. They are doing the job they were hired to do.

    When I eat out. I tip 15-20% based on the quality of service if it is table service. For the girl who is busy paying attention to the table over there and never bothers to see if my meal was OK, or my drink needed to be refilled, etc, and it always seems to be a girl, I under tip and usually let the manager know. I've waited tables- I know how hard it can be. Hubby always wants to over tip.

    My pet peeve is when I have to hand my bags to the porters at the cruise ship docks in Miami and Ft Lauderdale and they hold out their hand for a tip. I already had my bag tagged for the shio, brought it to them next to the big bin for the ship it is going on, and all they needed to do was lift it in. They receive a salary for that.

    On the other hand, when we disembarked and one of us was in a wheelchair and I needed a porter to load my bags onto a dolly and assist us through the line, I was happy to tip him a $20 and give the wheelchair pusher a tip as well.
     
    #4
    krisseye and Mandy_Elaine like this.
  5. jsn55

    Staff Member Advocate

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2014
    Messages:
    4,459
    Likes Received:
    4,309
    You remind me of another service category where I always tip: anyone who has my luggage and is in a position to either load it properly or let it fall off the pier!
     
    #5
  6. kenish

    Staff Member Advocate

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2015
    Messages:
    977
    Likes Received:
    1,614
    @Debi mentioned Japan. Do *not* "add extra" money, or a tip! The staff will find it borderline insulting, you are saying their service isn't good enough for you, and money will make it so.

    I appreciate good service and extra effort, but here in the USA tipping is out of control. It's actually becoming a big deterrent to potential foreign visitors. Interesting aside- many employees have said that they need tips to make ends meet. I actually understand their point. Now that many cities and states are enacting "living wage" laws and increasing the minimum wage, will the same workers no longer need or expect tips? :)
     
    #6
    krisseye likes this.
  7. Jim Loomis

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2014
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    5
    Wow! I'm sorry, but what a bunch of cheapskates! Of course you should not tip if the service is poor. But housekeepers? You know perfectly well that these people are at the low end of the pay scale and you're staying in a hotel that costs a couple of hundred bucks a night or more. And you won't leave a five dollar bill for the housekeeper when you check out?? Shame on you! Besides, it's my understanding that the IRS assumes service workers are being tipped and they pay tax on what the government estimates their tip income is. Like it or not, tipping is the system in the U.S. and if you can afford to travel, you can afford to tip.
     
    #7
    Nancy and Neil like this.
  8. Fishplate

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2016
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    17
    Which housekeeper will get the money?
     
    #8
  9. eaglebird

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2016
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    45
    Spouse and I have travelled a lot, US and abroad. Japanese service is amazing. And, yes, no tipping, ever. Here, in US, we used to tip more, but then service was better. Now, for one-night stay, no tip. Often, if staying at hotel like Homewood Suites for two nights, we request no room cleaning. It's not needed. There are plenty of towels and soap, etc. Again, no tip. When we stay longer, especially at resort, each morning we call to request early cleaning, so when we return in early afternoon, room is already done. By the way, we have noticed that often, on longer stays, housekeeping may not replenish soap, shampoo, etc. every day, but, almost always sets out double on our last day. Perhaps hoping for good tip? Which we are happy to provide. I read somewhere that hotels don't mind one taking the extra soap, etc. as they want you to use it at home and have happy memories of your stay. Makes sense.

    When flying, we travel with carry-on luggage only. Bring our own bags to room. When on driving trips, usually bring more and tip accordingly. for bags being taken from trunk, and re-stowed upon departure. We, also, are not sure who in housekeeping gets tips if we pay only on last day. Sometimes, we see the same housekeeping person each morning, and will tip her personally, and thank her, should we encounter her in hallway.
     
    #9
  10. Neil

    Neil Moderator
    Staff Member Advocate

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2014
    Messages:
    7,396
    Likes Received:
    7,848
    I leave a few dollars daily for the housekeeper who cleans that day. Since it may be a different person each day, leaving a tip daily ensures the person cleaning my room that day gets it.
     
    #10
    Nancy likes this.
  11. cjm

    cjm

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2016
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    6
    Housekeepers have the hardest job of all. Who wants to pick up after strangers? One should always leave a tip for the maid, and a smaller amount in the evening if there is turndown service.
     
    #11
    Neil likes this.
  12. Jim Loomis

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2014
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    5
    Sorry, that wasn't clear. I leave the money in the room.
     
    #12
    Neil likes this.
  13. Neil

    Neil Moderator
    Staff Member Advocate

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2014
    Messages:
    7,396
    Likes Received:
    7,848
    I just think of the nasty things that a housekeeper has to clean up because a lot of people are slobs and think that a hotel room is for partying and more. While she won't have to clean up anything unusual in my room, they may have to in someone elses. I also think most people, unless they are experienced travelers don't tip and I try to do the right thing for someone who is taking care of me.

    The tipping that drives me crazy is when I go to Dunkin Donuts and there is a tip cup for making me a cup of coffee. THAT is unnecessary tipping.

    It pays to do some research on tipping customs in different countries if you are traveling someplace exotic and not run of the mill to make sure that you aren't insulting people when yo do leave a tip.
     
    #13
    krisseye, jsn55 and kenish like this.
  14. Art1

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know I've left messy rooms and felt bad about not tipping the housekeeper because I almost never carry cash.
     
    #14
  15. George M

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2015
    Messages:
    404
    Likes Received:
    677
    I always try to tip the housekeeper personally if I catch her / him in the hallway. If not, I'll leave my $3 to $5 in an inconspicuous place because I've seen maintenance people using their passkeys and grabbing tips from rooms before the housekeeper gets in to clean. If the room has a refrigerator I leave it in the freezer. If not, I'll leave it under something in the bathroom that will have to be moved while cleaning.
     
    #15
  16. Neil

    Neil Moderator
    Staff Member Advocate

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2014
    Messages:
    7,396
    Likes Received:
    7,848
    That's really not an excuse if you know you are leaving a messy room. If you know you are staying in a hotel you can certainly get $10 in singles.


    Art, this thread is almost a year old and the person who wrote for help is no longer reading replies. This also brings old threads to the first page, pushing active threads off the first page.

    We suggest not posting on old threads since it doesn't help the original writer who is now longer reading the thread.
     
    #16
  17. william_leeper

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    2
    Service workers are only taxed on their estimated tips IF they are not paid minimum wage to start with. Housekeepers are almost universally paid minimum wage, so they are expected to report their tips as income to their employers, and withholding is based upon the actual amount of tips.
     
    #17

Share This Page