Question about Caesars Entertainment offer?

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Aug 22, 2017
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#1
Just a few minutes ago I got a call from a telemarketer (on my cell) from a telemarketer. When I asked him who he was he said he worked for a marketing group that was contracted by Caesars Entertainment. He offered me a great deal on 3 nights at any of there hotels in Vegas ( except Caesars Palace) and a free show for 2 people for 379 dollars plus 26 dollar daily resort fee with all kinds of free resort coupons. He said there were no blackout dates and I could travel any time in the next 2 years and cancel the deal within 14 days of booking but he wanted me to book tonight. I told him thanks but no thanks then he countered with 299 dollars and I again said no thanks.

Truth be told, I would have jumped on the deal had I known it was legit but I had no way of knowing if it was real or some kind of scam. He asked if I would like a call back in a couple of months and I said no thanks and that was that. So I was wondering, is there any way of telling if the deal is real or a scam? Have any of you ever heard of Caesars Entertainment doing something like this? I asked the guy what the catch was, because I thought the deal was just too good due to being able to go any time I want in the next two years, and he said Caesars was willing to lose money on the deal to make money off me in the long run by wowing me with great service and making me a repeat customer. It seemed somewhat plausible but I'm just not the trusting type. Also he was not your normal pushy telemarketer and that made me kind of think it was a scam. Anyone have any experience with something like this from Caesars or other Vegas hotel groups? And is it possible to figure out if the deal is real or a scam because honestly I'd LOVE to buy the deal, IF I know its legit. I called Caesars reservations number a few minutes ago to ask about it and all I could get out of the operator was there sales pitch, which was not as great of a deal. Any thoughts?
 
Likes: jsn55
Jan 11, 2017
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#3
You were very wise not to accept an offer for this 'good' (???) deal.
Do not give out your credit card numbers through phone, even if they claim to be from a familiar business (your bank, utility company etc.), if it was not you, who initiated the call.

Couple of red flags.
- he said - Anybody can claim, offer anything by phone. even if it is a legitimate call, ask the offer in writing or ask for a call back number then give yourself 48-72 hours cool-down/research period
- no blackouts day, any hotels in a 2 year period - No way. Vegas hotel prices are extremely fluctuating. During holidays, big events, conventions prices are skyrocketing, but off peak days they are very - very cheap. (Much cheaper than even the $299+resort fee offer for three nights.)
- free coupons, free show Free coupons means, you get hundred useless coupons to buy useless, overpriced things for 'discounted' prices.
Free ticket for what shows?
Maybe it is only me, but I would not attend 90% of the Vegas shows even if they pay for it.
Ceasar do not need random new costumers. They need their current guests to spend more:)

Even if it is a legitimate offer:
-$379/299 + $26 daily resort fee With taxes the daily resort fee is higher in any Ceasar hotels. He conveniently omitted the taxes probably from the room prices too. As I mentinoed these prices are too high for off-peak days.

Nevertheless, I hope you do have the chance to visit Vegas in the near future - it is fun, and it can be done very cheap, without any gimmicks.
 
Sep 19, 2015
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#4
The OP was right to be suspicious. No written promotional materials with disclaimers, just promises on the telephone.... and then the pressure and lowering the price....

I think the only people that get great deals on hotel rooms in Vegas are those that get comped -- and that is because they gamble (and lose) a lot. So the hotel is still making money.

No I do not think Ceasar's or any other Vegas hotel contracts marketing firms that use call centers to make random calls. The deal that was described likely does not exist -- either time share presentation or just straight out fraud.
 
Likes: jsn55
Jul 27, 2016
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#5
Three possibilities:

1. The deal was on the up-and-up.
2. The caller was affiliated with Caesar's somehow, but the real deal is much less attractive than it appears (blackout dates, availability restrictions, hidden fees, timeshare presentations, travel club membership, etc.).
3. It's a straight-out scam looking to steal your card number.

Since this is talking about Vegas, I'll put it this way: hoping that it was #1 is drawing to an inside straight.
 

Carrie Livingston

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Jan 6, 2015
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#7
I normally do not answer calls on my cell from numbers I don't know. Then I google the number to determine who it was that called me. Generally it's a telemarketer. In your case, I'd bet you would have to sit for a time share presentation at some point. That could eat up half a day. Not worth it.

ETA - If they don't leave a message, it's not important.
 
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Aug 22, 2017
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#9
Normally I don't answer the phone to numbers I don't know but I applied for a job in Nevada a while back so I answered when I saw the 702 area code. The number was 702-323-1900. And when I asked about it being too good to be true he did say it was not a time share. I called the number a few minutes ago and it just rang without anybody picking up or voicemail.
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
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www.promalvacations.com
#10
Normally I don't answer the phone to numbers I don't know but I applied for a job in Nevada a while back so I answered when I saw the 702 area code. The number was 702-323-1900. And when I asked about it being too good to be true he did say it was not a time share. I called the number a few minutes ago and it just rang without anybody picking up or voicemail.
So there you have it. If you had given them your cc number and had to call them for something- how do you get hold of them?

You dodged a bullet.

If you do a search on google for rjstbphine number, this is what comes up and how professional they are. It’s a SCAM

http://www.whycall.me/702-323-1900.html


https://800notes.com/Phone.aspx/1-702-323-1900

https://whocallsme.com/Phone-Number.aspx/7023231900

https://www.shouldianswer.com/phone-number/7023231900

https://www.callercenter.com/702-323-1900.html
 
Jul 27, 2016
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#11
As an FYI, the Nomorobo service does an excellent job of blocking robocalls. It's free for landlines (works with some carriers, including Comcast and Spectrum, but not all), and they now have a cellphone service that's $2/month.

For landlines, it uses the "simultaneous ring feature" of your phone, so that it rings at your house and also at their number. Their system, when it sees the caller ID is a robocall, immediately picks up the call and then hangs up. So, the phone does ring in your home, but only once. For cellphones, you can set it to just flag incoming calls as robocalls, or to automatically route them to voicemail.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#13
Just a few minutes ago I got a call from a telemarketer (on my cell) from a telemarketer. When I asked him who he was he said he worked for a marketing group that was contracted by Caesars Entertainment. He offered me a great deal on 3 nights at any of there hotels in Vegas ( except Caesars Palace) and a free show for 2 people for 379 dollars plus 26 dollar daily resort fee with all kinds of free resort coupons. He said there were no blackout dates and I could travel any time in the next 2 years and cancel the deal within 14 days of booking but he wanted me to book tonight. I told him thanks but no thanks then he countered with 299 dollars and I again said no thanks.

Truth be told, I would have jumped on the deal had I known it was legit but I had no way of knowing if it was real or some kind of scam. He asked if I would like a call back in a couple of months and I said no thanks and that was that. So I was wondering, is there any way of telling if the deal is real or a scam? Have any of you ever heard of Caesars Entertainment doing something like this? I asked the guy what the catch was, because I thought the deal was just too good due to being able to go any time I want in the next two years, and he said Caesars was willing to lose money on the deal to make money off me in the long run by wowing me with great service and making me a repeat customer. It seemed somewhat plausible but I'm just not the trusting type. Also he was not your normal pushy telemarketer and that made me kind of think it was a scam. Anyone have any experience with something like this from Caesars or other Vegas hotel groups? And is it possible to figure out if the deal is real or a scam because honestly I'd LOVE to buy the deal, IF I know its legit. I called Caesars reservations number a few minutes ago to ask about it and all I could get out of the operator was there sales pitch, which was not as great of a deal. Any thoughts?
While I understand the emotions involved, tarheel, never fall for any of these telephone scams. They are still scams, even tho the quality of the callers seems to be greatly improved.

I got led down a path a few months ago by two guys that were so good ... they had an ad on an internet search about Yahoo service with a phone number which I called for assistance. My husband was having some kind of issue with his email. I was on the phone with them I'll bet for half an hour before they finally started sinking into their scam roles and I hung up. I was mortified to have believed them for half an hour!

So the old tried and true advice still holds ... when a telemarketer calls, wish him a good night and hang up the phone.