NCL Cruise- Need To Board in Juneau, (Not Seattle) for 60th Anniversary Cruise

  • Hi Guest, welcome to the help forum. You can get fast answers to your customer service questions here. We have a dedicated team of advocates who are ready to help. Just go to the section that matches your question and ask us!
  • If you've posted a question or issue for our advocates to assist with, please be sure to check back frequently for responses and requests for clarification.
  • Did you know you can get email notifications when something new posts to your favorite forum? It's easy. Just click the "watch" link right next to the "post new thread" button at the top of your favorite forum. The rest is easy. Now you'll never miss another conversation.
  • Want to become an expert user? Drop by the How to use this forum section and all will be revealed. We'll show you how to make the most of your experience.
May 28, 2018
1
0
1
59
#1
Hello All- Our entire family is going on my in-laws 60th wedding anniversary cruise to Alaska, leaving from Seattle on August 12. Someone from the family changed the dates from August 19th. The problem is that I am working until August 12, late afternoon. My wife and I can meet and begin the cruise (the Norwegian Pearl) at the first stop in Juneau, AK on the Tuesday (Monday is at sea). This is definitely extenuating circumstances. All our siblings, all of our children and grandchildren are going on the cruise and we are being told that there are no exceptions, we can’t join up in Juneau. I am sure that there are always exceptions. We are part of a large group. What are our options to be able to join up with our family in Juneau?
 

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
11,986
12,233
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#2
It depends on if the ship stops in Canada or not. It is an unusual circumstance- you need to contact the travel agent you booked through or NCL. Have you made final payment yet? I would not make final unless you get it in writing full NCL. We aren’t qualified to answer that here.

Call them ASAP.
 
Likes: AMA
Jun 27, 2017
62
113
33
#4
I just looked up this NCL Cruise: Seattle-Seatle. Aug 12-19. Last stop is Victoria, Canada. I think that may be the problem. Doesn't the Jones Act prevent LouisL from boarding in Juneau when he can't board in Seattle?

The Jones Act (also known as the Passenger Services Act) prohibits ships of Non-U.S registry from embarking and debarking guests at two different U.S ports. Such travel would constitute point-to-point transportation between two U.S ports, which is prohibited on foreign-flagged ships. The Norwegian Pearl is currently sailing under the flag of the Bahamas.

LouisL ... this is a lovely itinerary. Glacier Bay is spectacular. Please try to get off work early. We don't know where you are flying from, but it is advisable to get to Seattle the day before the cruise, Aug. 11.
 
Last edited:
Likes: jsn55
Sep 19, 2015
1,767
3,024
113
47
#6
Sorry LouisL, there really are no exceptions for a planned missing of the departure of the cruise ship. The complicated maritime laws do not allow it. Some cruise lines will accommodate for a true emergency (ie leaving the cruise line early for a death in the family, or the airport is closed for weather) but it has to be a true documented emergency and the passenger has to cover the fine that the cruise ship gets -- over $700 per person
One of the cruise lines has a good post on this:

The Jones Act (also known as the Passenger Services Act) prohibits ships of Non-U.S registry from embarking and debarking guests at two different U.S ports. Such travel would constitute point-to-point transportation between two U.S ports, which is prohibited on foreign flagged ships. Note: Puerto Rico and the U.S Virgin Islands (St. Thomas; St. Croix; St. John) are not in the category of U.S ports under this act.


The exception to this rule is if the itinerary includes a 'distant foreign port'. South America and the ABC Islands (Aruba-Bonaire-Curacao) do qualify as distant foreign ports. Canada, Mexico, Central America, Bermuda and most Caribbean Islands do not qualify as distant foreign ports.


Any guest who insists on embarking (due to unforeseen circumstances outside the guest’s control, for missing the ship) or debarking (for emergency reasons), which violates the Jones Act, will accept responsibility for any resulting penalties ($762 USD per person). Important Note: Guests cannot pre-plan or purposely embark or debark a ship in a U.S port that will violate the Jones Act.

https://help.carnival.com/app/answe...s-act-/-passenger-services-act-/-cabotage-law
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
6,393
6,453
113
San Francisco
#7
How awful. There's really no way the cruise line can accommodate you. This is not a cruise line procedure rule, it's the law. You'll have to think of something for work so you can fly to Seattle the day before embarkation. I wish we had better news.
 
Likes: SierraRose49

Neil Maley

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Dec 27, 2014
11,986
12,233
113
New York
www.promalvacations.com
#8
The reason you are not going to be able to do this is because it is a closed loop cruise.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passenger_Vessel_Services_Act_of_1886

They cannot legally transport from an American port to another American port without visiting a distant foreign port which has to be outside of North America. Canada does not count.
Again- he needs to call NCL- they are the experts. And I agree with the comment about trying to get off work a few days early- there is most likely no other choice except to cancel the cruise.