International Roaming Charge Surprise

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Aug 21, 2017
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#1
I use Vodafone here in Spain and have international roaming for the EU and the U.S. After a short trip to Marrakesh, Morocco not realizing (must get better with my geography) I was shocked at the charges to use International Roaming in Africa!

Of course, this will never happen again and it is a very expensive lesson learned. We have talked with Vodafone and they said, So Sorry, So Sad and would do nothing to refund even a small portion. It was over 300€ for a 5 day trip.

Would talking to the higher ups result in a better result? We are seniors and this hit has us hard.

Thank you.

Phyllis
 
Feb 9, 2016
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#4
appeal and be very apologetic. Dont give them a sob story about being poor or anything, just tell them you didn't realize coverage would turn into South Africa, that you are very sorry, that it will never happen again, and could they please eliminate the charges, or maybe reduce them? One or the other will happen, then be grateful.
 

John Galbraith

Staff Member
Director
Jan 22, 2017
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#5
Hi Phyllis,

I have researched and published some contacts for Vodafone for you to use. They can be found here. The only one that is not relevant for you is the CEO for UK. They have a CEO for each major country they operate in as well as a Group Chief Executive. I will message you the CEO details for Spain.

I hope that helps
 
Last edited:
Jan 6, 2015
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#8
I believe for both. It was not separated but I used the data outside the flat we were quite a bit for directions, etc.
Thank you. I usually recommend turning off data if possible when traveling outside your country of residence, but your usage for directions is certainly understandable.

That said, the charges don't seem excessive as directions can require a lot of data usage. In your appeal keep in mind you are asking for an exception.

And in the future, you could consider renting or purchasing a GPS. We have seen places where cellular data is unavailable her is the USA but our GPS still works. Friends who travel in Europe a lot have told us that their GPS always works and would never travel with it ...
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#9
VoR is right ... a GPS is a much better resource for travel information. Dorking around with internet signals and roaming issues make a phone the worst choice. My Garmin was under $100 ten years ago, and comes with lifetime US map updates. Every few years I guy a complete set of Europe maps ... and the thing is beyond accurate.
 
Aug 21, 2017
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#11
VoR is right ... a GPS is a much better resource for travel information. Dorking around with internet signals and roaming issues make a phone the worst choice. My Garmin was under $100 ten years ago, and comes with lifetime US map updates. Every few years I guy a complete set of Europe maps ... and the thing is beyond accurate.
I also downloaded from Google Maps the map of the city and that helped too. Bringing a GPS is a great idea.
 
Likes: VoR61
Jul 27, 2016
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#12
VoR is right ... a GPS is a much better resource for travel information. Dorking around with internet signals and roaming issues make a phone the worst choice. My Garmin was under $100 ten years ago, and comes with lifetime US map updates. Every few years I guy a complete set of Europe maps ... and the thing is beyond accurate.
Totally disagree. I've used my phone for Google Maps (walking/public transport) or Waze (driving) in multiple countries, and it's always worked beautifully. I dumped my GPS years ago, and have never looked back.

You carry a Garmin around walking through foreign cities? Really? Does your Garmin give you public transport directions?
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Feb 9, 2016
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#13
SUCCESS! With the first email! With all your suggestions and John Galbraith's contact info I am receiving a 214.09€ refund! It was way more than I expected and I am so grateful for all your help and for this forum!

If there is somewhere else I can write accolades please send a link.
reply to them and thank them profusely, praise their excellent response and customer service, and let them know it will never happen again.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#15
Totally disagree. I've used my phone for Google Maps (walking/public transport) or Waze (driving) in multiple countries, and it's always worked beautifully. I dumped my GPS years ago, and have never looked back.

You carry a Garmin around walking through foreign cities? Really? Does your Garmin give you public transport directions?
So happy for you. Perhaps you'd like to review our OP's case for relevance.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#17
No more or less relevant than the post to which I responded, which was about the best choice for local navigation when overseas, as was mine.
Our OP had major problems using her phone, that's why we were pointing out the advantages of a GPS. We do not list 'best choices', we offer our OPs information and our opinions to make their own decisions.
 
Likes: Neil Maley
Apr 10, 2017
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#18
No more or less relevant than the post to which I responded, which was about the best choice for local navigation when overseas, as was mine.
A smartphone certainly works very well for travel but as the OP learned it can be quite expensive to use internationally if one isn't careful. The OP could benefit from a GPS if she plans to drive anywhere outside her cell coverage area. I use both when I travel depending on the purpose. My cell phone plan includes unlimited data pretty much anywhere I go but I much prefer a GPS for driving. I agree a phone is great for walking directions and navigating public transit. The OP could still use these features by taking advantage of wifi whenever possible.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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San Francisco
#19
A smartphone certainly works very well for travel but as the OP learned it can be quite expensive to use internationally if one isn't careful. The OP could benefit from a GPS if she plans to drive anywhere outside her cell coverage area. I use both when I travel depending on the purpose. My cell phone plan includes unlimited data pretty much anywhere I go but I much prefer a GPS for driving. I agree a phone is great for walking directions and navigating public transit. The OP could still use these features by taking advantage of wifi whenever possible.
Google, smartphones, GPS ... and a handy MAP in my pocket so I know where I'm walking. Life doesn't have to be complicated; the journey can be as enjoyable as the destination.
 
Likes: VoR61

Carrie Livingston

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Jan 6, 2015
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#20
One tidbit I picked up from a recent cruiser to Cuba. He said that his cell phone service wouldn't work but he could still navigate with Google maps. He figured that Cuba might be blocking some services but couldn't block the satellites.