HP Probook Laptop

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Mar 10, 2021
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Could someone just please explain the following to me and put this in writing for me. I bought this Probook laptop, 5 month back at a price of R13551.99. While using the laptop HP security prompts me to complete the information that they want .I completed the security question. The next step they wanted a fingerprint copy. I did not want this option because when I am not at my laptop and ask someone to retrieve information on my laptop they won't be able to do so. Then the request was for a password. This is also then a problem. Because I had to leave I pushed the power off button. The next morning HP wanted me to either enter a fingerprint or password. I did not have either of these !Now I am locked out of my own laptop. I cannot access my own information. I tried an IT person but all he did was to contact you and get a quote. To be able to use my own laptop and to access my own information I have to pay HP an amount of R4670.00 This is over $500 I did not agree to any term and condition concerning this system. To me this is then " Black mailing ".You do not have an easy option according to HP. You black mail me to pay you to enable me to use my own property. Not your property any more. Black mail me by locking the right to my information, not yours !To me this is also a violation of human rights !Could any of your legal advisors answer this claim to me before I proceed with any further actions.
 

VoR61

Jan 6, 2015
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Your position that this is "blackmail" and "a violation of human rights", if you are considering a legal remedy, requires a consult with an attorney licensed to practice in your country. Forum volunteers are constrained from offering specific legal counsel.

For your immediate needs, HP or a local technical consultant need to assist. I recommend that escalate this VIA EMAIL using the contacts provided in the following link
be sure to start at the lowest level and that you give each contact one (1) week to respond before escalating to the next level
*politely state only that laptop is unusable and request technical assistance (you may want to add how long it has been in your possession)*
thank them for their time and consideration

If you receive any error messages, you can request new contacts using this link: Research Request Form

Please take the time to update this thread as you progress toward a resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Your feedback is important to the forum volunteers (advocates)
 
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Dec 19, 2014
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1) none of us are legal advisors here. We are volunteers who guide you in navigating the process to reaching a satisfactory outcome.
2) I own a HP laptop, so I am familiar with the setup process. Your narrative doesn't make sense. When you setup the computer, you will need to enter your fingerprint and create a password. That is the only time that you should be prompted to do so. If you lock your computer, then just do a factory reset. That will restore the computer. The computer should not prompt you to set up a password or fingerprint AFTER the computer has been in use.
3) There are ways of resetting your password without getting HP involved. But, this is outside of the scope of this forum

Can you clarify?
 
Sep 18, 2018
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Have you tried the many, many solutions online for Windows users in the same situation? Here's one from Microsoft with this relevant answer:

On the lock screen, on the bottom right is a power button
Press the Shift Key and click Restart
Your PC will boot into the Windows Recovery Environment
Go to Troubleshoot - Advanced Options - Reset this PC
Choose to keep your files and apps, just your files or to keep nothing
Then start the Reset


If you cannot get into Windows:

Start PC, just as Windows attempts to load (spinning dots), press and hold Power Button for 5 - 10 seconds to perform a Hard Shut Down

Do this twice

On the third start Windows will boot into the Recovery Environment and from there you can access System Repair, Safe Mode, Command Prompt . . . etc.

Go to Troubleshoot - Advanced Options - Reset this PC
Choose to keep your files and apps, just your files or to keep nothing
Then start the Reset
 
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Comicman

Jul 13, 2020
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Click the windows start tab and click the gear symbol ( settings)
Go to Accounts > Sign in options.
Then select the option require sign in NEVER.
Or select sign in with pin number and tape the number to the laptop for others to use.
 
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Jun 24, 2019
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To our OP, if the suggestions above do not work, so that you need to write HP as also suggested above, I was puzzled by the timing. You bought the laptop 5 months back. Then you did not enter a fingerprint or password during initial setup. Was the initial setup five months ago, or did the laptop sit idle for five months?
 
Sep 18, 2018
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Click the windows start tab and click the gear symbol ( settings)
Go to Accounts > Sign in options.
Then select the option require sign in NEVER.
Or select sign in with pin number and tape the number to the laptop for others to use.
This requires being able to sign in initially to do. The OP can't do that.
 
Feb 11, 2018
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Click the windows start tab and click the gear symbol ( settings)
Go to Accounts > Sign in options.
Then select the option require sign in NEVER.
Or select sign in with pin number and tape the number to the laptop for others to use.
You're right. No one is required to set a password on a PC. In fact, it's rather silly if it's a PC that only you will use. However, the setup instructions do seem to imply that setting up a password (or fingerprint ID) is necessary--one of Microsoft's annoyances.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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You're right. No one is required to set a password on a PC. In fact, it's rather silly if it's a PC that only you will use. However, the setup instructions do seem to imply that setting up a password (or fingerprint ID) is necessary--one of Microsoft's annoyances.
Microsoft is a never-ending example of how to treat customers callously; not a week goes by that there's another example of obscure, confusing baloney. So most of MS stuff is just ignored ... which can't be good in the long run. Even when you drill down, you still aren't given any kind of reasonable, clear explanation for anything. It's a very sad commentary on a huge rich company just playing with their customers. Oh that I had learned on an Apple way back when!
 

Carrie Livingston

Moderator
Staff Member
Advocate
Jan 6, 2015
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Fanus tried to reply to this thread earlier today. I will copy his responses below.

Response to Comicman There is no way that you could get into any program. The screen had a Blue collour and all that was on the screen was a block to enter a password. NO other options was shown. Not even the local IT company could manage to do their magic

Response to SoCalTraveler When I bought the laptop 5 months ago and started it, Then the popup came up the first time. I just ignored it. Every now and then after starting the laptop it pop up. This partially day just before I finished work this came up again and I thought of filling in the info to be rid of it. But when I realized that this is going to be an extra security setup I just closed the laptop till the next morning

Response to VoR61
Hi Thank for the assistance.
An HP person made contact via messenger. He did not want to give me his details. He asked some questions and then said that he will come back to me. Later he did reply and confirmed that the only option is to replace the security Bios chip and that he cannot do any thing about this.
I then told him that I will definitely not accept the fact that they lock my laptop and information and then ask n fee to unlock. And that I will make this public on all platform as soon as I receive the invoice, receipt and proof.
The next day he replied and asked additional questions then said he will hand it over to higher authority.
I am still waiting for the repair and return of the laptop from HP


Response to Chris in NC
Hi Sorry for the late Reply.
The HP Bios security popped up just before I retired for the day.
I did not know what this was for so I started completing all questions. Then I realized I do not want an extra security setup and just closed the laptop . The next day it did not want to allow me to open up the system without a password.
If I pressed something I was not supposed to I really don't know. I took it to a IT company that had a look. They contacted HP and was told there is no way that you can open or bypass the system. The only thing is to replace the Bios Chip at n reddiculess price
 
Last edited:

jmv

Mar 6, 2019
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Microsoft is a never-ending example of how to treat customers callously; not a week goes by that there's another example of obscure, confusing baloney. So most of MS stuff is just ignored ... which can't be good in the long run. Even when you drill down, you still aren't given any kind of reasonable, clear explanation for anything. It's a very sad commentary on a huge rich company just playing with their customers. Oh that I had learned on an Apple way back when!
Requiring a password to login to a computer is now standard practice. Apple does the same thing. Android tablets and phones do as well. It is also a good practice since it helps safeguard personal information if the device is stolen. Microsoft windows does allow you to turn this feature off, Apple does not.
 
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Comicman

Jul 13, 2020
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I was going to reply that you might want to have a computer tech person re-burn your EPROM with a different bios. You would need to get a currect Windows install on a memory stick (you could do this on a different computer) to reinstall windows. As the guy you spoke to told you could also have the a new bios chip installed but that might just start the problem all over again.
I know this would be on your dime but have you tried taking it to an independent computer store? Maybe they can hack a solution for you ... for money.
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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Requiring a password to login to a computer is now standard practice. Apple does the same thing. Android tablets and phones do as well. It is also a good practice since it helps safeguard personal information if the device is stolen. Microsoft windows does allow you to turn this feature off, Apple does not.
Agreed, passwords are vital protection and have been for a long time. Who would use a computer without one? My issues are with the sometimes-confusing instructions and lack of detail given by MS and/or the hardware manufacturer.
 
Aug 30, 2015
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Agreed, passwords are vital protection and have been for a long time. Who would use a computer without one? My issues are with the sometimes-confusing instructions and lack of detail given by MS and/or the hardware manufacturer.
The wizards are quite effective, helpful, and functional. The problems here were caused by "not" following the instructions, not by having misleading ones. Hundreds and hundreds of millions of computers are in use, the vast majority of them with no problems.

As to the OP, there is a website that they could get someone else to make an "install" stick using a USB 8 gB or greater "thumb drive" which is bootable. The Windows license on newer machines is encoded into the computer, so this would facilitate a fresh install although any data would be lost. "Create installation media" would be the task at hand, which involves downloading and running the install program, and following the instructions. https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10
 

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
10,823
12,603
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San Francisco
The wizards are quite effective, helpful, and functional. The problems here were caused by "not" following the instructions, not by having misleading ones. Hundreds and hundreds of millions of computers are in use, the vast majority of them with no problems.

As to the OP, there is a website that they could get someone else to make an "install" stick using a USB 8 gB or greater "thumb drive" which is bootable. The Windows license on newer machines is encoded into the computer, so this would facilitate a fresh install although any data would be lost. "Create installation media" would be the task at hand, which involves downloading and running the install program, and following the instructions. https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10
I'm smiling Bill. Not sure that you are aware of the number of us find doing things with our computers quite daunting. "Booting a computer from a USB 8 gB thumb drive" is a great example. I know what all the words are/mean, but it would be an impossible task for me without very clear instructions ... such as "1. Open the package with the thumb drive, 2. Turn on your computer ... " Instructions may not be misleading, but they are not geared toward someone who needs a very simplistic approach because they ARE the household/office IT Department and there are no other resources easily available.
 
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Aug 30, 2015
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I'm smiling Bill. Not sure that you are aware of the number of us find doing things with our computers quite daunting. "Booting a computer from a USB 8 gB thumb drive" is a great example. I know what all the words are/mean, but it would be an impossible task for me without very clear instructions ... such as "1. Open the package with the thumb drive, 2. Turn on your computer ... " Instructions may not be misleading, but they are not geared toward someone who needs a very simplistic approach because they ARE the household/office IT Department and there are no other resources easily available.
I have walked quite a few non-it people through this process. But there are some that are never going to get there. It does amaze me how many people can go through the steps to make something in a recipe book, step by step, but the minute it is with a computer, they can't do it. Most small computer shops will reload your computer for a hundred dollars or so, and that's not a bad deal for people who can't manage it.
 

Mel65

Mar 23, 2015
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Click the windows start tab and click the gear symbol ( settings)
Go to Accounts > Sign in options.
Then select the option require sign in NEVER.
Or select sign in with pin number and tape the number to the laptop for others to use.
It sounds like he can't get past the sign in screen to get to the windows page/settings option.
 
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Sep 5, 2018
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The OP seems to be describing a BIOS password or fingerprint scan that an HP "wizard," which may have popped up unsolicited, offered to set up. OP may have gotten partway through the process and then decided to abandon the configuration. This may have left the BIOS security in an unstable state.
The machine is effectively "bricked" - unable to get past the HP BIOS security. If it can't complete the BIOS check it cannot move on to start Windows and will never get to the Windows log in screen. Booting a new Windows 10 install from USB is similarly prevented.
HP says this, "A forgotten BIOS password cannot be reset by HP. HP is committed to the security and privacy of our customers. To resolve a forgotten BIOS password issue, a system board replacement is required, and additional customer costs apply. For more information, go to HP Worldwide Limited Warranty and Technical Support."