Early Termination Fee and Moving to an Unserviced Area

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Aug 31, 2016
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#1
Hello there!

I'm about to copy and paste a letter I have on the "Comcast Help and Support" page. I have a few responses, none of them good. I'll also supply the link in case you all want to read the responses. I simply can not understand how Comcast can justify charging folks an ETF when they are moving to an unserviced area. No other company I have dealt with has ever required that when moving. Internet/TV/Phone should to be considered a "utility" . This practice is so unethical and ought be illegal. Needless to say, there is no way I'll accept this offer.

What constitutes a contract? A phone call, an email or a written document with my signature? What say you forum folks? Here's my letter and link:

"I received a promotion to lock in a certain price for 3 years. I am tempted but do not like what I am reading about early termination fees when one moves to an area not serviced by Comcast. I have been a cable customer (various companies) for decades and have always been let out of a contract, no fees, when moving to another state not serviced by that company. I mean, honestly, people do move for whatever reason, why should they be penalized because a cable company is not in that area? Not very ethical.

I would like someone from Comcast to tell me, in writing, that what I have read is wrong and that you do not charge an early termination fee because someone is moving out of your area of service.

All that said, I'm in an apartment and doubt I'll be here for another 3 years. I very well may move to a serviced Comcast area or may not. I'd like to take you up on the offer but I need assurances I will not be stuck with an early termination fee through no fault of my own."

http://forums.xfinity.com/t5/Billin...ving-to-an-unserviced-area/m-p/2793489#M88970
 
Feb 9, 2016
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#2
idk why you are bothering with a letter about what you heard. just ask them flat out - "I would like to sign up for your service for a period of X. I am concerned that, should I transfer jobs or need to relocate to an area that you do not service, I may be penalized with an early termination fee, is that the case"

They will answer the letter/question
 
Likes: jsn55
Aug 31, 2016
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#3
idk why you are bothering with a letter about what you heard. just ask them flat out - "I would like to sign up for your service for a period of X. I am concerned that, should I transfer jobs or need to relocate to an area that you do not service, I may be penalized with an early termination fee, is that the case"

They will answer the letter/question
Many people have said (from what I've read) that they call and are told one thing, then when it's time to move, are told they owe an ETF. In other words Comcast lies to them. I just wanted to know if this is common practice and what Elliott's forum people thought about it and "contracts" in general that have no signatures. Maybe I shouldn't have posted here.
 
Feb 9, 2016
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#4
Many people have said (from what I've read) that they call and are told one thing, then when it's time to move, are told they owe an ETF. In other words Comcast lies to them. I just wanted to know if this is common practice and what Elliott's forum people thought about it and "contracts" in general that have no signatures. Maybe I shouldn't have posted here.
You can certainly post whatever you want here!

Ah. my bad, I thought you were asking for yourself.
We are used to responding to consumers in distress....not preemptive questions :)

Legally speaking, oral contracts are valid. A lot of times phone calls are recorded such that oral contracts/conversations can be recalled if necessary. As well, our service installation calls may have items we sign where, we acknowledge the installation as well as the fine print buried in the document, where those pesky agreements live.

From what I have seen here, there have been cases where CS reps say one thing and the reality is markedly different.

What most consumers do not know is that conversations are recorded so they can go back demand that a supervisor listen.

We also counsel people that, if they are on the phone arranging for service, they need to record everything that was said along with the name of the person, location and time of the conversation. That way they have documentation.

As well, a lot of the times the CS people don't outright lie. They are actually poorly trained. The call center people will loose their jobs if they continue to sell a package incorrectly/don't know their products/packages, etc. Sometimes the CS agent is not responsible for company snafu's but the consumer takes it out on them anyway.
 
Aug 31, 2016
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#5
You can certainly post whatever you want here!

Ah. my bad, I thought you were asking for yourself.
We are used to responding to consumers in distress....not preemptive questions :)

Legally speaking, oral contracts are valid. A lot of times phone calls are recorded such that oral contracts/conversations can be recalled if necessary. As well, our service installation calls may have items we sign where, we acknowledge the installation as well as the fine print buried in the document, where those pesky agreements live.

From what I have seen here, there have been cases where CS reps say one thing and the reality is markedly different.

What most consumers do not know is that conversations are recorded so they can go back demand that a supervisor listen.

We also counsel people that, if they are on the phone arranging for service, they need to record everything that was said along with the name of the person, location and time of the conversation. That way they have documentation.

As well, a lot of the times the CS people don't outright lie. They are actually poorly trained. The call center people will loose their jobs if they continue to sell a package incorrectly/don't know their products/packages, etc. Sometimes the CS agent is not responsible for company snafu's but the consumer takes it out on them anyway.

I am such a long time reader of Elliott that your advice has many times saved me from distress, so thank you! I am actually asking for myself (and to make others aware) because soon I will need to renew my year with Comcast (nevermind the 3 year deal) and am wondering if I always have to time my moves, if they are out of the service area, with their contract. I mean, who can DO that? Something is wrong with that picture. I think the Early Termination Fee charged when a person moves out of a service area is totally unethical. I really do not understand how they can get away with it. Because they can? Because they're practically a monopoly? OK, I'm done and I do thank you for your time.
 
Likes: sas80

jsn55

Verified Member
Dec 26, 2014
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#6
I am such a long time reader of Elliott that your advice has many times saved me from distress, so thank you! I am actually asking for myself (and to make others aware) because soon I will need to renew my year with Comcast (nevermind the 3 year deal) and am wondering if I always have to time my moves, if they are out of the service area, with their contract. I mean, who can DO that? Something is wrong with that picture. I think the Early Termination Fee charged when a person moves out of a service area is totally unethical. I really do not understand how they can get away with it. Because they can? Because they're practically a monopoly? OK, I'm done and I do thank you for your time.
I don't know how someone deals with this either. I am extremely happy with ComCast at the office and I once asked a service rep why the residential service was always 'in trouble'. She told me that it was a combination of sheer numbers and that reps on the business side are 'better'. I have a satellite at home, and if I had to put up with the shenanigans I read about here, I don't think I'd have any service at all. Of course, the husband and his sports would preclude that decision. I am ever-puzzled about how the tele-communications companies all manage to offer such terrible customer service; it must be a combination of many factors.
 
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